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October 09, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuetd(y, October 9, 1975

A

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

V
_______________________________________________________________________ I

Page Five
mromm4

U'Symphony:

Viewing a
the scenes

Showcasing Shaw
Dunois (Randall Forte) and Joan (Adele Ahronheim) rehearse
for the University Players' production of G.B. Shaw's Saint Joan,
which opens tomorrow night at Power Center. The production
runs through Saturday.
New local cultural
magazine published

concert
By TONY CECERE Bac
Friday night, Oct. 5, 7:15: bell a
Backstage at Hill Aud. my fel- practi
low members of the University Brah
Symphony are preparing to play all I
the group's first concert of ;he next t
semester. audito
rings,
The air backstage is heavy the o
with the scent of 75 perfumes and Sever
after-shave lotions as well as the game
noise of 75 instruments being Afte
warmed up.
move
Everyone looks splendid in chestr
concert dress -. long black dress- anoth:
es, penguinesque tuxedos. We ment
would be well dressed for d wed- indivi
ding or a funeral, but I hope mouth
that our first concert more close-
iv resembles the former and not The
the latter. even tI
anne
The programs are passed tress,
down, and the concert order is silenc
the Brahm's Third Symphony, oboef
"Angelus Novus," a new work by tuning
Tomas Marco, and Stravinsky's opens
"Firebird Suite." cantar
The broadcaster from WUOM dium.
scribbles furiously the following plause
information, knowing well that it smiles
can fill up empty air space: The
Tomas Marco is young, gifted, massi
and Spanish. He is considered to credib
be in the "avant" of the Madrid symphi
avant-garde. "Anglus Novus" mosti
was composed in homage to Mah- we ha
ler (1970), using certain elements rehea
'that Mahler himself would have it i
employed: tympani crashes, The m
sleigh bells and harp sound ef- cosun
fects. onstag
11:00 4
50
IKAV-1:30 2
4 :1
90
tonight 5
tunyn1:0095
6:00 2 4 7 News 1
56 zoom 10
50 Gilligan's Island 1 15 2
6:30 2 CBS News4
4 NBC News45 2
7ABC News
9 1 Dream of Jeannie
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Antiques
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4News
To Tell the Truth
9Beverly Hillbillies
50 Sixth Sense
56 Church Alive
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Bd Schembecher SH
7 Price is Right
9 Bewitched
50 Pro Basketball
56 Yesterday's Headlines
8:00 2 Maude
4 America
7 Temperatures Rising
9 Strlost-Science Fiction
56 Black Composers
special:
8:30 2 Hawaii Five-}
7 Movie
"Shirts/Skins"
9:00 4 Magician
9:30 2 Shaft-Crime Drama
Debut
9 Front Page Challenge
56 Roberta Flack
10:00 4 Police Story
7 Marcus Welby, M..
9 United Way Kickoff
50 Perry Mason
56 To be announced

k downstairs, Laura Camp-
nd I with my French horn
ce a duet we have in the
ms, but it is to no avail-
can hear is the tuba player
o us. In a far alcove of Iec
orium, the warning bell
and almost lemming-like,
rchestra trudges upstairs.
al rainchecks on Pinochle,
s are taken.
r a proper amount of
ment and shuffle the or-
a seats itself and makes
er proper amount of move-
and shuffle, followed by
dual testing of r e e d s,
pieces and drumsticks.
cacaphony fades away and
the audience shuts up. Suz-
Ornstein, our concertmis-
is met with applause. Then
e; she signals the first
for an A, the traditional
note. Backstage the door
and conductor Theo Ala-
'a strides proudly to his po-
He acknowledges his ap-
e, mounts the podium and
at us.
baton comes down and two
ve chords, two walls of in-
le sound start the Brahms
hony. Our reactions are al-
instinctive ones, for what
ve done dozens of times in
rsals is done again.
s hardly routine, however.
music is too absorbing, too
ming for that. Time flies
ge, and the piece is soon
4 7 News
One Step Beyond
Movie
"The Law and Jake Wade"
(1958).
Johnny Carson
File itUnder Fear
News
"The Gunfighter." (1950)
Movie
"Me and the Colonel."
(1958)
7 News
Movie
"Cry Tough." (1959)
News

over. Intermission.
Most sane performers head
right for the bathroom at inter-
mission, producing a long jam at
the doors of the john. Somehow
the wait is well worth it. The
water fountain is the next stop.
People are reassuring one an-
other - it went very well, the
audience liked it. The audience is
our ultimate barometer - they
show the emotional impact of
our collective efforts.
Once onstage I am aware of
the lights at the ceiling, not be-
cause of the light, but because
of the incredible heat.
Now the American premiere of
the "Angelus Novus",replete
with wa-wa sounds, tam tam
noise and a baby crying in the
audience. The Stravinsky, well
known to the audience, brings
Have a flair for 9
artistic writing?
if you are interest-
poetry, and musi
or writing feature
stories about the
drama. dance, ftilm,
arts: Contact Arif
Editor, c/o the
Michigan Daily.

the house down. People out there.
are standing up, cheering, clap-
ping, screaming "Bravo!" and
enjoying themselves.
As the audience goes home,
the orchestra retires to Metz-
ger's, Bimbo's and other houses
of food and drink. After all, we
earned it.
Philippines
to dance Sun.
Complete with native orches-
tra, the Bayanihan Philippine
Dance Company returns to Power
Center for its third Ann Arbor
visit this Sunday at 3 and 8 p.m.
Sponsored by the University
Musical Society, the 27 dancers
make use of Indo-Arabian fan-
tasies, as well as the colorful
Spanish influence on their islands,
in a wide variety of dance styles.
Tickets are available at Burton
Tower.
"ARENA" PRODUCTION
HOLLYWOOD (UPI)-"Arena"
has been acquired by MGM as
one of its major 1973-74 produc-
tions.

behind

and 1Jr. 'Wel
saturd
v oct. 13,8Pm
c4
.y HILL AUD.
# ' 4 .'0A0, 'r 5c 34

r.

the mouIriO at BRIARWOOI

Adjacent to J.C. Penney

0 769-8780 * 1-94 & S. State, Ann Arbor

By MARY BENSON
It pays to examine your mail
carefully. That's what quite a
few Ann Arbor residents dis-
covered last month when they
took a second look at what first
appeared to be a standard, al-
beit clever, flyer advertising a
new publication.
These randomly selected people
had received the first issue of
Periodical Lunch, the latest of-
fering of Street Fiction Press.
That's the local group who also
put out Anon, a yearly University
literary magazine, and Spineless
Fiction.
"Yes, but what is this thing if
it is not an advertisement?"
you ask. Well, it's an unwieldy
collection of about 25 loose pages
surrounded by a wrapper and
then sealed in a plastic bag.
Available at the University
Cellar and local bookstores, those
25 pages contain: lists of local
events, recitals, craft guilds,
bookstores, bars, restaurants,
community service organizations,
a recipe for onion soup, poems,
sngs, book reviews, short stories,
interestingdgraphics, superb ads,
an~d on and on.
The format and graphics add
an extra dimension to this com-

'Y
is

pendium that raises it from the
ranks of the ordinary literary
nagazine.I
P e r i o d i c a l Lunch is com-
piled by editor Warren Hecht, a
creative writing instructor at the
Residential College, and a coterie
of contributors and staff. Lunch
is put out by Giraffe Graphics,
another local enterprise.
Coping with those pages (It
doesn't matter if you drop the
whole thing on the floor; each
page is a self-contained unit),
looking at its contents, anticipat-
ing what could possibly come
next, the reader is transformed
into a participant.
The poetry -and fiction are
promising, though unsubstantial.
Editorial selection policy may be
responsible for this. In an effort
to keep things light and attrac-
tive in the maiden issue, flash
may have substituted for heft.
With a policy of actively seek-
ing out local talent, and a staff
that already includes several of
the area's better talents-Peter
Anderson, Howard Kohn, and
Marge Piercy-Periodical Lunch
can only improve.
It has all the characteristics of
a snowball rolling down a snow-
covered mountain.

EMU Major Events Committee
PRESENTS:
October 13
Bowen Field House
TICKETS ON SALE WED., SEPT. 26
$4.00 advance, $5 at the door
general admission
TICKETS ON SALE at: Hudson's, AA Music Mart,
Grinnells, Huckleberry Party Store, McKenny Uniont

ai

I.

10:20, 12:15, 2:10, 4:05,
6:05, 8:05, 10:10

S

i

This
cep
plays
Take
away
hl'
badge
anid
he'd
top
the
Ten
Most
Wanted
lost!

AIi 7i
ELIZABETH
TAYLOR
LAURENCE
HARVEY

I

HU S A IOOOCOL.ON A W WSIC..
+7A1MO,9:20

CHARLES R N$6I0
the II

4"NIGT
WIT04

10:35, 12:25, 2;15, 4:10,
6:00, 7:55, 9:45

10:40, 12:35, 2:30, 4:25,
6:20, 8:15, 10:10

OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
OWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
DON'T MISS IT!
Rated G

DAILY EARLY BiRD MATINEES (EXCEPT SUN. & HOLIDAYS)
Open 10 a.m. Adult admission $1.00 till 1:30, Mon. thru Sat.

1

I

F,

I

I

UAC-Daystar Presents:

s': f
:

ANORMA ) MFVSON f0m
JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR"

CUITURE CA L ENIDAR
flILM-Ann Arbor Film Co-op presents McCabe and Mrs. Mil-
ler, Aud. A, 7, 9:30 p.m.; Cinema Guild features Ball of
Fire in Arch. Aud. at 7 and 9:05; New World Film Co-op
presents I Am Curious Yellow in Aud. 3, MLB at 7:30 and
9:30.
MUSIC SCHOOL-Wind and Percussion Student Recital in
SM Recital Hall at 12:30 p.m.; Recital by organ majors in
Hill Aud. at 3:30.

"A JOY! STUNNING! BEAUTIFUL!"
NY TIMES -SATURDAY REVIEW -PLAYBOY
PARAMOUNT PICTURES piens
A SHE IIL'4
F1kACO ZEFFIREWL
Produton or
&JULIET TECHNICOLOR
603 astlibrtyBACK TO THRILL YOU AGAIN!
Open Daily at 12:45
Shows at 1 p.m.-3:30-6:10-8:45
COMING-James Coburn is
"~HARRY IN YOUR POCKET"

TH COODY BLUES
Thursday, Nov. 8, 1973 $7.00, $6.50, $5.50 (rear)
8:00 p.m. Crisler Arena. all seats reserved
Tickets go on sale TODAY, Oct. 9,10:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
only at Crisler Arena walk up window box office.

Limit 6 tickets per person. No personal checks.

Should any tickets remain, they will
Desk on Wednesday, October 10th. 1

be sold at the Michigan Union Lobby Ticket
1:00 am-5:30 pm.

m"

Call 763-1 109 anytime for recorded information message.
Ann Arbor is one of only 13 cities on the Moody Blues 1973 North American tour.

POETRY-The University's Extension Service and Dept.
English present Michael Harper reading his poetry
Aud. 4, MLB at 4:10.

of
in

OTHER COMING ATTRACTIONS PRESENTED BY UAC-DAYSTAR:

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Repertery Companies Series
USHER APPLICATION

ON SALE NOW MICHIGAN UNION

NAME-
ADDRESS-

B. B. King Fri. Oct. 19-Hill Aud.-$5.50-$5.0044.50-$3.50
Judy Coli*ns Sat. Oct. 20-Hill Aud-$5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.00
Roberta Flack Sat .Oct 21-Hill Aud-$6.00-$5.50-$5.00-$4.00
ON SALE SOON:
Mim. rnieocoming Wed. Nov. 14 to Power Center $2.50

TELEPHONLC.=__

U. OF M, ID. NO.

RULES
1. You must be a U. of M. student.
2. You must choose your series in order of preference.
3. Married students may send applications together.
4. This application must be mailed by U.S. Mail NO SOON-
ER THAN OCTOBER 15, 1973. (Mail to: PTP Office,
Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor, MI 48104)
5. Include a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
PLEASE NUMBER CHOICE 1.2. 3.4. 5. 6

i

I ULYL-r IiMA U' iI*U1' 'AV U kfV*Ut

s

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