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October 07, 1973 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-07

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Page Four
RING DAY
Tu., OCt 9 an We., OCt1
0a.m. to 4 p.m.
'k4
4 a
~ t
LTHE PRINCESS BRIDE
by WILLIAM GOLDMAN
TRY THIS BOOK AT CENTICORE'S RISK
Our reviewer says about The pm
Princess Bride: Never in my lifec
Fhave I enjoyed a b o o k more.
SThat a fantasy, told partly with . .
Stongue in cheek, should .have
such aneffect on a jaded cynical
reiweJost' Rpaseseief wilasso
ous, dazzing inventive, dazz-
ous, dazzlingly mventice, dazzl-
r ingly written and great fun. The
P Marx Bros. couldn't have Written
it better.
Therefore, Centicore makes an offer it has
never made before. Buy this book from us and
if you don't agree you've never had more fun,
give it back to us and we'll give you a ful
refund.
$7.95 +
Mar Bo.cud'ae rte
4Centicore Bookshos
0 4
336 MAYNARD 1229 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 7, 1973

.... ...

9i

Prostitution:

Who

real

HUSTLING: PROSTITU-
TION IN OUR WIDE OPEN
SOCIETY by Gail Sheehy.
New York: Delacorate Press,
273 pages, $7.95.
By TONY SCHWARTZ
G AIL SHEEHY may be the
most versatile journalist in
America today. She has the guts,
the persistence and the moxie to
do terrific investigative report-
ing. Her prose is rich and tight,
a pleasure to read because it is
seldom self-indulgent (in contrast
to her early colleagues at the
Herald-Tribune, notably c 1o s e-
friend Tom Wolfe). And when she
writes about people, she is able
to insinuate herself on them, to
learn the little details and cap-
ture the dimension of their lives.
"Hustling" is a book about
prostitution in New York, a col-
lection of separate pieces, many
of which appeared in New York
Magazine. As to the subject, the
appeal is obvious: perhaps never
have so many been so interested
and known so little.
In this book, Sheehy manages
to employ nearly all of her varied

talents. Rather than a "New
Journalist," Sheehy fancies her-
self a "saturation r e p o r t e r."
That means getting the full story.
Specifically it meant walking
New York's dangerous streets
until the wee hours of the morn-
ing with the lowest streetwalk-
ers; riding in police vans after
mass busts; wading through mis-
leading documents to find out
who really does financially con-
trol the fleebag hotels, peep
shows and massage parlors in
New York; and, finally, talking
to enough people to develop a
network of reliable sources.
THE RESULT is an important
book: at once illuminating and
titillating-and at least in some
measure responsible for a crack-
down last year in New York on
more than just the small-time,
all - too - commonly victimized
streetwalkers. The people Sheehy
was interested in were the many
calculatedly anonymous syco-
phants who walk away with the
lion's share of prostitution's es-
timated 7-9 billion dollar yearly
revenue.

If Sheehy is right, the common
prostitute gets pimped in more
ways than one. Sheehy estimates
that a streetwalker averages $100
a week take home. Since that
amount represents the net from
a $200-$300 nightly gross, Sheehy
reasons that a lot of other people
are making money. First, of.

HUSTLING is organized as an
ascent up the caste-ladder,
beginning with the most widely
publicized piece: "Redpants and
Sugarman." Done as a composite
portrait constructed out of ihe
many prostitutes and pimps she
met while walking nights in front
of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel, it

"The picture which emerges is a sleazy, de-
pressing, often demented one which time after
time destroys common fantasties about the

ly profi
JN SUCCEEDING c h a p t e r , Court r
Sheehy deals with real and spe to pris
cific people: a degenerate gross- about s
hotel owner; a fascinating, con- tinuest
tradictory independent call girl; in the<
an incredible, f r e n e t i c white resultsa
pimp; and the surprising New Despi
York big-shots who own the luc- amplee
rative pornography .real estate men wi
(and stay purposefully in the faction
background). Finally she returns who, re<
to a composite to portray the ul- lure of
timate of tricks: the courtesan are will
who marries solely for great prostitu
wealth and social position. subcultu
hustlers
SHEEHY'S conclusions about thievesi
the world she describes are business
all too brief. She sums up her Illega
work by saying, "The struggle degrad
against big-city prostitution and legalize
blatant pornography is not a blue- c 1 e a n
noser's battle against sexual lib- wheren
eration. It is a battle against ploye w
crime of the rankest kind." To exploite
take it a step further: despite ND
all our talk of a sexual revolu- book
tion, this country-as reaffirmed Prostitu
in the recent ludicrous Suprebe because

uling on obscenity-clings
tine, Victorian attitudes
ex. The government con-
to legislate morality, and
area of prostitution, the
are appalling.
te its illegality, there is
evidence that thousands of
ll continue to seek satis-
from the many women
sponding to the sweet at-
apparently easy money,
ing to service them. Were
tion legalized, a waoia
ure of corporate rip-offs,
and two-bit d e r e l i c t
would likely be put out of
>s.
lity breeds fear, violence,
ation and corruption. To
prostitution would mean
, healthful, safe places
neither customer nor em-
vould have to be viciously
ed.
THIS is what Sheehy's
finally makes clear:
ution attracts criminals
it is itself criminal.

ts?

I

world of prostitution

. .

riS $i'>:: :": : :i J::v:: :

course, is the girl's pimp, who
usually gets the night's take in
a lump sum, and doles it out
meagerly when it catches his
fancy. But then there are also
profession prostitute lawyers, ho-
tel owners, corrupt police, medi-
cal expenses, clothes and make-
up and wigs . . .

is the story of one ultimateLy
hustled street whore and her
smooth, ruthless/ pimp. Sheehy
defends the composite technique
(under fire from traditional jour-
nalists) by saying "it enabled -me
to reconstruct the whole career
of a prostitute from beginning to
end. Every word . . . was true."
ri/ and1

A

mai

his credence:

Ann Arbor Speaks !
TODAY: 2:30-5:00 p.m.
WCBN FM 89.5 "Tclkback
questions/ comments welcome
JUST CALL 761-3500
SPEAK YOUR MIND!

What

else

does

he

NINETY - TWO IN T H E
SHADE by T h o m a s Mc-
Guane; Farrar, Straus and
G i r o u x, New York; 197
pages, $6.95.

- - _______ ___________- - i

THE BAGELS FOR BRUNCH BUNCH
PRESENTS
The Effect of the Holocaust
on Israeli Foreign Policy
A DIALOGUE BETWEEN:
MAJOR TUVIA NAVOT: retired officer Israeli
Defense Forces
AND
PROF. RAYMOND TANTER: Prof. of Political
Science and \Hebrew, University of Jerusalem
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7-11:00 A.M.
AT HILLEL--1429 HILL ST.

11

By ROB HORWITZ
WITH THE opening paragraph
of Ninety-Two in the Shade,
Thomas McGuane sets you trot-
ting along with Tom Skelton who,
in a drug-crazed stupor, attempts
to flee Hotcakesland, (read:
America) - the get-down capital
of the technological universe ...
"where teenagers learn the Aus-
tralian crawl at sun-drenched,
cretinoid country clubs, where

even aging wage slaves burn up
the Cornhuskers Highway on
polyglas radial tires; the Ameri-
can Plains in a blue rear-view
mirror . . . buffalo - haunted
dreamland of a vacant republic.
It must have been something
Skelton ate."
Skelton is, to put it mildly,
bummed out-
He heads for Key West, home
of his schizoid father, ever-pa-
tient mother and political payoff
man, jack-of-all - corrupt-trades
grandfather. Skelton's determin-
ed goal, after abandoning a life
as a marine biologist, is to be-
come the best fishing guide in the
Keys. He decides to master the

techniques of Nichol Dance, the
reigning king of/ guidedom.
"A displaced bumpkin run out
of his own unmortgaged bar for
shooting a man in the horse
business through the wishbone in
not quite indisputable defense;
part of the world of American
bad actors who, when the chips
are down, go to Florida with all
the gothics and grotesqueries of
chrome and poured-to-form con-
crete that'that implies."
ON SKELTON'S first and next-
to-last guiding job he is humiliat-
ed by a cruel practical joke per-
petrated by Dance. Skelton re-
taliates ' by blowing up Dance's
boat.
0At this point Dance knows, "va-
cant -of any emotion based on
property," that he must; kill
Skelton if he ever attempts to
guide in the Keys again. It is not
a question of "honor" in the tra-
ditional sense. Rather, he has to
"follow -through" or else lose his
"credence." For, after all, what
does a man, with nothing for the
world to remember him by, pos-
sess except his credence?
. Like Dance, Skelton's credence
is also put to the test, setting the
two men on a lcollision course
awaiting Skelton's next inevitable
move toward guiding. The men
have a great deal of respect and
affection for each other, but as
j Skelton says prophetically: there
is nothing worse than being a
"bystander" in Hotcakesland.

have?
to be McGuane's post-Watergate
and post-Vietnam recreations of
Hemingway's American Macho
men. They are placed in violent
rivalry, a love-hate relationship
of great intensity and tragic con-
sequence.
This theme is also reflected in
McGuane's two previous novels.
In The Sporting Club, a pair of

PIZZA
IN HOT ELECTRIC OVENS
FAST, FREE DELIVERY
ALSO SERVING
LUNCHES, DINNERS, GREEK

NO 3-5902
NO 3-3379
PASTRIES

COTTAGE INN
THE OLDEST PIZZERIA IN ANN ARBOR
512 E. WILLIAM
10 am.-2 a.m. (Fri. and Sat. until 3)

I

F,

m

Fr

.1

UAC-Daystar Presents:

T

EI

kOOD

BLUES

Thursday, -Nov. 8, 1973 $7.00, $6.50, $5.50 (rear)
8:00 p.m. Criser Arena all seats reserved
Tickets go on sale Tues., Oct. 9, 10 a.m. to 6:30
only at Criser Arena walk up window box office.
Limit 6 tickets per person. No personal checks.

FIFT H FOR UM
210 S. FIFTH AVE.
ANN ARBOR i
"THIS IS AN ARTIST'S USE OF ANIMATION TO THE Nth
POWER, EXPRESSING SOCIAL VIEWPOINT. BAKSHI MOLDS
ANIMATION TO NEW HEIGHTS OF SOCIAL COMMENT."
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
.H y ,
} Entertainment!
)
SHOW TIMES 7, 8:20, 9:40
SUNDAY MATINEE AT 3 & 4:45
An unsurpassed cast!
l CHRISTOPHER
_ PLUMMER
ORSON WELLES - LILLI PALMER
RICHARD JOHNSON
OEDIPUS THZ KING
BEAUTIFULLY DIRECTED"-New Yorker

IN
built

IIAI BUY'S
ARMY
SURPILUS
1166 Broadway
(north of Broadway bridge)
769-9247
open: mon-fri: 10-7 sat: 9-6
FIELD
JACKETS ... $10.98 UP
FIELD JACKET
LINERS ... .4.50 UP
DOWN FILLED
STUFF JACKETS 19.98
LEATHER FLIGHT
JACKETS .. ..67.98
AIR FORCE SNORKEL
PARKAS........49.98
DOWN INSULATED
PARKAS .... 37.98 UP
INSULATED
SWEATSHIRTS ... :6.98
Another location at 2050 N.
Telegraph Rd. at Ford Rd.,
Dearborn-ph. 565-6605

AN ERA of elaborate lies
upon lies these men seem

Should any tickets remain, they will
Desk on Wednesday, October 10th. 1

be sold at the Michigan Union Lobby Ticket
1:00 am-5:30 pm.

boyhood friends rival for person
al domination in an agonizing
physical and emotional struggle.
In The Bushwhacked Piano, the
hero snatches the gorgeous dam-
sel from the vice-like grip of her
wealthy father and cowboy boy-
friend, only to discover that they
just don't get along.
McGUANE UTILIZES his fre-
netic style and imagination to or-
ganize many scenes into a biz-
arre pop fantasies. He, like
Skelton, seems to see his days
numbered "like a month of Sun-
days" and writesdaccordingly,
following the credo of one of
Skelton's interminable mutter-
ings - "Facetiousness can be a
way of dancing at the edges 'of
the beautiful: it can .also be face-
tiousness." But he does not par-
ticularly care which is the case,
since every readershas his or her
own personal sense of the out-
rageous.
With the fates of the two main
characters directed on their in-
evitable course, the last two-
thirds of the book bobs and
weaves its way through a genef-
al trashing of the "Kounter Kul-
ture", art, rationalization of
modern existence, and- even the
author's own writing.
Pondering his death, -which
draws closer each day, Skelton
decides to explore his ancestrial
ties, hoping to find some clue to
the meaning of it all. He is con-
stantly engaging in verbal joust-
ing with his manic-depressive
father, who sits in bed for months
on end reading Shakespeare,
Neitzche, Baba Ram Dass, before
suddenly striking out on another
of his monumental projects-
among them : a blimp works,
gun running, and a decadent
whorehouse.
T H E S E TRIPPY, fantastic
scenes at first elicit a raptuous
amused response. Yet their jux-
taposition with the life-and-death
credence - saving struggle be-
tween Dance and Skelton - end-
ing on the final two pages in both
their deaths - tempers the read-
ers initial superficial response.
What initially seemedrabsurd
finally strikes the reader as a
frightening and starkly convinc-
ing portrait of our times.-

Call 763-1109 anytime for recorded information message.

Ann Arbor is one of only

13 cities on the Moody Blues 1973 North American tour.

OTHER COMING ATTRACTIONS PRESENTED BY UAC-DAYSTAR:
ON SALE NOW MICHIGAN UNION
B. B. King Fri. Oct. 19-Hill Aud.-$5.50-5.O0-$4.50-$3.50
Judy Collins Sat. Oct. 20-Hill Aud-$5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.00
Roberta Flack Sat .Oct. 27-Hill Aud-$6.00-$5.50-$5.00-4.00
SALE SOON:

(
I
i
:

1
4;-MARJOE
This Academy Award winning documentary cap
tures the con-man in action as he preaches hell
fa...tire and damnation in the "religious business
'Maroe s superstar style began with gigs with his
parents at the age of3 and led to his retirement

San Francisco comma Wed. Nov. 14 to Power Center $1.50
..m .- mmWd.N.14tPwrCner$.

I

I

,I

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