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October 05, 1973 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1973-10-05

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October 5, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

October 5, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

m

TORmenting
chuck bloom m
NCAA-AAU feud...
... a workable solution
SENATE BILL 2365. Amendment 459. Together these two pieces
of legislation comprise the most controversial issue in
American sports. The Amateur Athletic Act of 1973, as the
legislation is known, will revolutionize amateur athletics in this
country as you and I know it. And hardly anyone has heard
about it.
The Amateur Act will essentially do three things:
(1) completely overhaul the United States Olympic
Committee (USOC) and replace it with a federal regulatory
agency.
(2) end the constant and harmful bickering between the
country's two major amateur powers, the National Collegiate {
Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Amateur Athletic Un-
ion (AAU), and
(3) provide federal assistance to those programs who
suffer from a lack of funds in the training of future com-
petitors:
"It is a bill designed to protect the rights of our amateur
athletes in athletic competition," states the bill's sponsor, Sena-j
tor John V. Tnney (D-Calif.), "and to provide the foundationy
for better training, better coaching, and better facilities for
amateur athletes."
The Summer Olympics Games of 1972 in Munich brought
to a head the various and complex problems plaguing amateur
sports in the United States. Poor management of the USOC costs
this country a lot more than a few gold medals and athletic
prestige.
Bureaucracy snarls Olympic efforts
The complex bureaucracy of the USOC cost swimmer Rick
DeMont his first place finish in the 400-meter freestyle when
he was disqualified for using an asthma drug ruled illegal by
International Olympic Committee standards, but overlooked in
a "routine" check up.
Two sprinters, Eddie Hart and Rey Robinson, were dis-
qualified from the trials of the 100-meter dash for not show-
ing up at the starting blocks on time, because the USOC
provided a faulty schedule of events to the team's track
coach, Stan Wright. Out of all 132 participating countries only
the United States managed to have the wrong information. j
"The record of the Twentieth Olympiad in Munich has ser-
iously damaged the spirit of the Olympics in the United States,"
Tunney says. "But even more disturbing, the administration of
the U.S. team at Munich has damaged the confidence of many
athletes in the abilities of U.S. Olympic officials to develop,
manage, and train a successful American entry in future Olympic
Games."
Add to that list, the 50 year old warfare between the NCAA
and AAU, culminating in the NCAA withdrawal from the AAU-
controlled USOC in November of 1972.
The most recent incident occurred- over the use of collegiate
basketball stars in the USSR-USA basketball series. The series
was sponsored by the AAU but until Congressional pressure forc-
ed a change of heart, the NCAA had withheld its athletes from
participating.
NCAA, AA U both fight reform
Despite its pleas for some sort of Olympic reform,
the NCAA finds the Amateur Athletic Act totally unaccept-
able. "The bill would constitute a major interference with
the autonomy of higher education institutions," states Prof.
Alan L. Chapman, president of the NCAA, "and it would
deny colleges and universities the authority effectively to
regulate their athletic programs."
Like the NCAA, the AAU is against the Senate bill 'but for
a different reason. It is the controlling interest on the Olympic
Committee and is the U.S. representative on many of the
various international federations. The proposed bill clearly will
eliminate much of the AAU's power and it is that, above every-
thing else, that the organization objects to.
In a letter dated July 17 and reprinted in the August issue
of the AAU News, AAU President David G. Rivenes and Execu-
tive Director Ollan C. Cassell state that since the AAU is recog-
nized by the international body, the status quo should be pre-
served.
Both the NCAA and the AAU have missed the point of the
legislation. For too long in this country, bureaucrats have dictat-
ed the course of American participation in international competi-
tion and at present, the course taken has resulted in nothing
but failure, disgrace, and total disregard for the athletes.
Athletes will have a say.
Under the proposed act, athletes will have the necessary free-
dom to compete in international competitions as sanctioned
by the appropriate sports association. They will comprise 20 per

cent of all sports associations and will be on the five-man Sports
Board.
Also the jurisdiction of the NCAA is not, contrary to its ob-
jections, tampered with. The amendment to the Tunney bill
clearly shows that:
"We recognize that educational institutions, both college
and high schools, have certain I e g i t i m a t e interests
which they may seek to protect by formulating rules limit-
ing athletes in competing when such competition inter-
feres with a valid educational function. Therefore, the only
allowable exception to the athlete's right to compete is a
denial based on rules which are reasonable and related to
education."
With the increasing importance of education, a college ath-
lete hopefully will voluntarily restrict his own competition in
favor of the diploma.
In addition, the bill will not regulate certain non-Olympic
sports such as football, tennis, and golf, again contrary to the
beliefs of the NCAA.
Last Wednesday, the Senate delayed action on the Ama-
teur Athletic Act of 1973 until November 8. Amendments
and counter-proposals now clutter up the legislation. The
NCAA, through Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kansas) is attempting to
limit the power of the Board and at the same time strengthen
its own position.
All the politicking, however, does not alter the need for
athletic reformation. The Tunney bill meets that need.
.......................... ....................
Pro Football Standings

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4
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Aerials

fly

by

By JOHN KAHLER
Nestled in the green valleys of
the Pacific Northwest, the Uni-
versity of Oregon does not re-
ceive much attention from the
rabid and somewhat provincial
football fans of the Midwest.
Since Oregon is providing the op-
position for the Michigan Wol-
verines this week, a few facts
about the school should be stat-
ed here.
The Webfeet bear the contrast-
ing distinctions of never having
scored a point on Michigan and
having "the best material of any
team we've faced yet" according
to Bo Schembechler.
In all of the Ducks' three loss-
es (to Arizona State, Air Force,
and Utah), they had a chance to
win in the last three minutes of
the game and could not capital-
ize on their opportunity. Assistant
coach Jesse Branch says of his
team's performance, "We just
have not been executing well."
Oregon's main hopes for break-
ing the Michigan scoreless streak
(14-0 in 1948 and 21-0 in 1960)
center on the flying feet of tail-
back Don Reynolds. Last year in
a Webfoot attack that featured
Dan Fouts passing, Reynolds
made the most of his limited op-
portunities to carry the ball,
rushing for an 8.1 yards per car-
ry average.
This year, with Fouts gone,
Reynolds has rushed for 645
yards in his first three games,
which comes out to 215 yards per
game and 5:2 yards per carry.
Branch, in something of an un-

SPORTS
NIGHT EDITOR: MARCIA MERKER

)uc ks
sistently given up the big gainer
in the air.
The star of the Webfoot line,
sophomore tackle Reggie Lewis,
as a freshman, established him-
self as one of the premier de-
fensive linemen on the West
Coast. His specialty is making
life miserable for opposing quar-
terbacks.
Another sophomore star is
weakside linebacker Bobby
Green, who picked up 65 tackles
last year. He has the quickness
and desire to make a nuisance of
himself for the opposition.
All in all, the Oregon Ducks
are . a rather inept team that
could be a real power if they can
ever get their abundant material
together. That possibility is what
is worrying Michigan coaches
this week.

Association of Jewish Faculty & Grads

GOOD
EATIN'
and
GOOD
MEETIN'

INVITES YOU TOA
PICNIC
SUNDAY, OCT. 7 at 4-7 p.m.
at ISLAND DRIVE PARK
CHARCOAL PROVIDED-BRING OWN FOOD
Join us for "Frisbie" and "Football"
Look for "Association of Grads" Sign

r

tingents in captivity. Tackles Tim
Guy and Ron Hunt and guards Le
Francis Arnold and Mark Bolli-
ger all weigh in excess of 240
pounds. Center Mike Popovich is
a feathery 224.
The Webfoot defense is a young
unit, with many sophomore letter-
men among its ranks. Schem-
bechler notes, "Nobody has run

on the Oregon defense yet this
year."
The Duck defensive statistics
against the run are indeed im-
pressive. They held the explosive
Arizona State ground attack to
138 yards. But most of this fine
effort has been negated by the
fact that the Ducks have con-

z. there's
Classified,

._ . . . _ _ . . _._ .. . . _ .. . .1. :kln.. . _

derstatement, says, "He's done NE
r~ I
well". * NEW
When Fouts departed to the
drier climates of San Diego, the
Ducks were faced with a large:**
hole at his quarterback position. _ >x.
Norval Turner has done a more
than capable job of filling the :.
hole. Behind him is a junior col-
lege transfer, Herb Singleton,
weighing 235 pounds. $ <;:.>
Tight end Russ Francis is con-
sidered by Willamette Valley
residents to be the best tight endv
in the country, Paul Seal not-r
withstanding. He has caught%
twelve passes this year and 3f
Branch claims "He is gettingt
better each week" **:* . :.:::.....:
When Reynolds is not running
the ball, fullback Eugene Brown In an effort to gain extra yardage against Air Force, Oregon's freshman Rick Kane (33) takes what-
provides power up the middle, ever route available to him. Kane and running mate Don Reynolds have provided plenty of punch in
and freshman Rick Kane speed the Oregon ground attack so far this season. In Oregon's first three games, Reynolds ripped through -
ouT sidWebfoot offensive line is enemy lines for 645 yards, all in a losing cause. Oregon meets Michigan on Saturday, 1:30 p.m., Mich- *
one of the largest blocking con- igan Stadium.
Gride ickoms
UAC presents
It was the best of pizzas. It was the worst of pizzas. Its cheese
was mozzarella, its ground beef soy. HOLIDAY BZAalong wi
Bursley Bum Kevin Krunch read those words from the ancient a * country f
Dickens text (assigned 9/17/73 for English Authors with Speech Im- *N remained
pediments) and knew something was wrong. Maybe it was those long * with a i
midnight rides with Serbo-Croation drivers who didn't know their * transfor
way to North Campus. Maybe it was the fact that Robben Fleming FIRST TIME EVER * is the m
couldn't explain the tuition hike. EAHOTEL U* love son
Whatever it was, Krunch was worried. Krunch had a history of S N ESTA BEACH GOLF CLUB rhythms
losing, stemming back to his childhood spelling bee career when he P.M
flubbed mandarin (m-a-n-d-e-r-i-n). DECEMBER 30-JANUARY 6
Then after he requested West Quad (someone told him all the Fri., Oct
cool guys hang out there), he was assigned to the YMCA (a "housing 0 Round trip jet Windsor/Nassau * Fri., Oct
*Fri., Oct,
shortage," John Feldkamp had called it).-!Choice of air-conditioned accommodations
Krunch however had a plan to recoup his gains. Let's see Mis- C-Schedule
souri over Southern Methodist, Iowa over Arizona . . . But time was 0 Full American breakfast daily * up at Bor
running out. Could Krunch get to 420 Maynard before midnight * All transfers & baggage handling
Friday? Could Oliver Twist find happiness with a pepperoni pizza? Private beach, free golf & tennis~
It's a far, far better thing he does today than he has ever done before.
1. Oregon at MICHIGAN 9. Duke at Purdue 230 +$14 DOUBLE
(pick score) 10. Wyoming at Wisconsin$ 0 1 O
3. Washington State at Ohio State 12. Holy Cross at Dartmouth
4. Nebraska at Minnesota 13. North Carolina at N.C. State
5. Stanford at Illinois 14. Colorado at Iowa State For More Information
6. Indiana at West Virginia 15. Missouri at Southern Methodist
7. Arizona at Iowa 16. Utah at UCLA UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
8. Ohio U. of Northwestern 1 TRAVEL OFFICE
17. Georgia at Alabama 2DFORMC IA NO
1___- 18. Texas Christian at Arkansas 2ND FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNIONAU O
1 . Kent State at Western Michigan PHONE: 763-2147 AUTHD
SCORES 20. Edit staff at DAILY LIBELS__ & R
I Advent

WORLD MEDIA

program 3
Free International
Film and Discussion
Series
FELIX GREENE'S
CUBA
VAt*

Cuban
Music-Literature
Produced and directed
r> :<: s"by Felix Greene.
76 minutes, color
A contemporary look at
the Cuba that liberated
its industries from the
........i t :.,<.. control of New York,
T e x a s and California
th Batista's oligarchy.It is about the people who freed their
om U S. crie syndicates who had made thertropical island
)uncl for Amer ican "tourists, while the majority of Cubans
Spoor, uneducated and without relief,' The film proceeds
unique record of how the revolutionary effort continues to
: a destitute peopie into a nation that has affirmed its right
land for the first time in four years. Featured throughout
usic of revoituionary Cuba: folk songs and popular ballads,
gs, classical music and "rock," beating out the insistent
of change the people are cxperiencing.

., 3rd floor, Multi-purpose Aud., UGLI

. 12-CUBA-"Memories of Underdevelopment"
.1-CHILE-"When the People Awake"
t26-IRELAND-"A Sense of Loss"

s are now available for complete series
rder's Books U-Cellar or any New world
New World Film Coop.

thru '74. Pick them
Film showing. spon-

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NHL Exhibition
Detroit 1, Buffalo 0
NBA-ABA Exhibition
Denver 113, Phoenix 111
Milwaukee 107, Buffalo 97
New York Knicks 105, NY Nets 87
Chicago 116, KC Omaha 95
Carolina 143, Indiana 112
Capital 146, Atlanta 130
Seattle at Portland, inc.
Boston at Utah, inc.
WHA Exhibition
New England 5, Toronto 2

COME TO THE
MICHIGAN UNION AND
WATCH THE FIRST ANNUAL
Michigan Union
Invitational Straight
Pool Tournament
SUNDAY, OCT. 7
GAMES AT 1, 3, 7, 9

I

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* CC
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kPER
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RIZED WARRANTY "THE FULLY-EQUIPPED
EPAIR STATION AUDIO LABORATORY"
" Akai
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)NSUMER AND PROFESSIONAL MODELS
E DO CUSTOM MODIFICATIONS

ALLCMPSTG
DELTA SIGMA DENTAL FRATERNITY
FRIDAY, OCT. 5-8:00 p.m.
1502 HILL

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Central Division

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Central Division

LIVE BAND

BEER

Minnesota
Detroit
Green Bay
Chicago

W L
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1 1
1 2

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Pittsburgh
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Hou11st on

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