100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 4, 1973

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OUT OF THE WHIRLWIND...
HOLOCAUST WEEK
The Gypsies, too, were victims - their
history and tragedy.
Professor William Lockwood
will speak as part of a program
Memorializing the Gypsies
-PLUS--a movie-
"THE GYPSIES"
THURSDAY, OCT. 4-8 P.M.

New
By BILL CRANE
The Michigan Coliseum skating
rink is no more. The ice is gone.
All that remains is the sand floor,
and some remnants of the times
when the Michigan hockey team
took the ice, or when sweethearts
spent a Saturday afternoon carv-
ing figure '8's with their skates.
Don't despair, h o w e v e r. The
Wolverines have a spanking new
ice skating facility-enclosed by
the framing of Yost Field House
--and the grand opening is near.
The Daily interviewed fresh-
man Hockey Coach Dan Farrell,
inquiring about the progress of
the new rink. Coach Farrell re-
ported that the foundation condi-
tions of the rink are now being
tested and that ice-making would
start as soon as possible.
Some minor problems have

YOST CONVERTED
hockey arena

arisen, but nothing of serious con-
sequences. The post holes for the
hockey-nets have to be re-drilled
and some temperature gauges
which act as thermostats (con-
trolling the ice temperature)
have not a r r i v e d. Additional
lighting is also scheduled-good
news for those who remember
the "old" Yost.
The new facilities look impres-
sive. The varsity locker rooms
have been remodeled and the
spectactor restrooms r e d o n e.
New boards and glass surround
the soon-to-be-laid ice with its
regulation 200 by 85 foot surface.
Hockey enthusiasts should have
less trouble keeping track of the
fast moving games this year,
thanks to the Coca-Cola score-
board. The valuable piece of ma-
chinery, $15,000 worth, is four

HILLEL

1429 Hill

Direct from Three Memorable Performances at the
ANN ARBOR BLUES & JAZZ FESTIVAL
the
THURS., OCT. 4th
AND EVERY THURS. THIS FALL
114 W. WASHINGTON between Main & Ashley

sided and equipped for penalties
as well as other mundane stats.
- Perhaps the most exciting ad-
dition at Yost are the ready to
be installed 5100 new bleacher
seats. The north and south ends
of the rink will accommodate 40
and 20 rows of seats, respective-
ly, with the sidelines each hav-
ing six rows. A capacity crowd at
Yost will contain 8100 partisans
sitting on maize and blue sup-
ports.
Although the rink transfer was
budgeted for $500,000, Athletic
Director Don Canham explained
that, "Yost Field House has been
improved little by little since
1969." The actual cost of moving
the rink came to an estimated
$325,000:However, improvements
since 1969 have raised the total
bill to the half-million mark.
Coach Farrell sees the new
arena as an important part of
Michigan hockey. "Last year,"
Farrell explained, "we had the
COME TO THE
MICHIGAN UNION AND
WATCH THE FIRST ANNUAL
Michigan Union
Invitational Straight
Pool Tournament
SUNDAY, OCT. 7
GAMES AT 1, 3, 7, 9

History Enthusiasts !
WHAT DO CHARLEMAGNE, MATA HARI AND
HISTORY UNDERGRAD ASSOCIATION HAVE IN
COMMON?
If you answered "They're all dead" You're wrong.
The HISTORY UNDERGRAD ASSOCIATION is alive
and meeting in 1412 MASON HALL
at 7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
TO BE DISCUSSED:
"Departmentol committee positions
"Translate: curriculum change"
* Election of officers
" Upcomng activities (remember coffee, donuts,
and revolution?)
* Obscure historical topics involving heavy phrases like
"economic repercussions end "cyclical nature"
" A nythino you'd like to brine up
* '""I the Big U getting to you? What can be worked towards
on the departmental level?"

opens
lowest average attendance in our
league. It's rather disturbing."
(Michigan averaged about 2450
per game compared to Wiscon-
sin's league leading average of
8400.)
Canham agreed that attendance
should increase. Yost has con-
venient parking facilities in ad-
dition to the rink. Canham point-
ed out however that attendance
will be largely determined by the
kind of hockey Michigan can
play. If hockey becomes "com-
petitive" attendance should in-
crease.
Intramural and open skating
use will be facilitated by tran-
sient locker rooms - ones that
skaters can rent. A s s i s t a n t
hockey coach Jim Keough guess-
ed that the opening could be
Oct. 15. Keough supplied tenta-
tive open skating -times also:
Saturdays 12:45 p.m.-2:15 p.m.,
Sundays 2:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m. and
Mondays 8:00 p.m.-9:45 p.m.
As the opening day for the
Yost Arena rink approaches, it
might be wise for those among
us of nimble feet to sharpen the
blades, replace the laces, and
take the thermal clothing out of
mothballs.
In a few weeks the skating
buffs will be able to frolic onto
the ice attempting to perform
escapades of our wildest imagin-
ation. Meanwhile, the Michigan
hockey team will be getting
ready for a tough season-one
that will be aided by a tremend-
ous new facility.
DO YOU KNOW
THE LEGEND OF
THE LONE RANGER?
FRI. & SAT.
at 8 & 10 p.m.
ADMISSION 75c
SEASON PASS $5.00
Couzens Cafeteria
A Couzen's Film Coop
Presentation

Yost Phase 1

Phone-665-6968

9:30 p.m.-1 :30 a.m.

i

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
Yost Phase 2
Yost Field House (above), in the mid-sixties, during the golden
era of the chamiponship basketball Wolverines. Many of these
memories will soon be forgotten when the renovation of Yost is
completed, adding spaciousness and color to the new home of Mich-
igan hockey aiding the Maize and Blue in pursuit of the WCHA
title.

'1

'ICI _n_ will IIE

Bring a box of salt
For Tequila Night Discount
THURSDAYS
OPEN 11:00-2:00
A moving experience in sound and light
341 S. MAIN ANN ARBOR
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT SUNDAYS,

DAVID'S BOOKS
663-8441
has mo v e d to Dio (when
worm) & basement 909 S State
(between State Theatre &
G:no's)
TOLKIEN CALENDERS &
CASTANEDA'S JOURNEY
TO IXTLAN (PAPERBACK)
25 % OFF etc.

READ and USE
DAILY CLASSI IEDS

__ E

Are you still
reading
the way your
parents read?
In the first grade, when you were taught
to read "Run Spot Run," you had to read it
out loud. Word-by-word. Later, in the second
grade, you were asked to read silently. But
you couldn't do it.
You stopped reading out loud, but you
continued to say every word to yourself.
Chances are, you're doing it right now.
This means that you read only as fast
as you talk. About 250 to 300 words per
minute. (Guiness' Book of World Records
lists John F. Kennedy as delivering the fast-
est speech on record: 327 words per
minute.)
The Evelyn Wood Course teaches you
to read without mentally saying each word
to yourself. Instead of reading one word at
a time, you'll learn to read groups of words.
To see how natural this is, look at the
dot over the line in bold type.
grass is green
You immediately see all three words.
Now look at the dot between the next two'
lines of type.-
and it grows
when it rains
With training, you'll learn to use your
innate ability to see groups of words.
As an Evelyn Wood graduate, you'll be
able to read between 1,000 and 3,000
words per minute . . . depending on the
difficulty of the material.
At 1,000 words per minute, you'll be
able to read a text book like Hofstadtler's
American Political Tradition and finish
each chapter in 11 minutes.
At 2,000 words per minute, you'll be
.able to read a magazine like Time or News-

week and finish each page in 31 seconds.
At 3,000 words per minute, you'll be
able to read the 447 page novel The God-
father in 1 hoer and 4 minutes.
These are documented statistics based
on the results of the 450,000 people who
have enrolled in the Evelyn Wood course
since its inception in 1959.
The course isn't complicated. There
are no machines. There are no notes to
take. And you don't have to memorize any-
thing.
95% of our graduates have improved
their reading ability by an average of 4.7
times. On rare occasions, a graduate's read-
ing ability isn't improved by at least 3 times.
In these instances, the tuition is completely
refunded.
Take a free
Mini-Lesson
on ]Evelyn Wood.
Do you want to see how the course,
works?
Then take a free Mini-Lesson.T-r The
Mini-Lesson is an hour long peek at what
the Evelyn Wood course offers.
We'll show you how it's possible to
accelerate your speed without skipping a
single word. You'll have a chance to try your
hand at it, and before it's over, you'll actually
increase your reading speed. (You'll only
increase it a little, but it's a start.)
We'll show you how we can extend your
memory. And we'll show you how we make
chapter outlining obsolete.
Take a Mini-Lesson this week. It's a
wild hour. And it's free.

When this 25-year-old researcher
wanted to investigate a possible cancer treatment
weg vehi the-goahead.
We alo gye him the right to fail.

At Kodak, it's not unusual for a 25-year-old like Jim
Carroll to win the title of senior research physicist. Like any
company involved in a lot of basic research, Kodak has felt
the pressure of modern technology and the need for young,
fresh thinking. So we hire the best talent we possibly can,
and then give them as much responsibility as they can han-
dIe. Whatever their age.
We have departments and divisions, like any company.

nology, and gave him the go-ahead. He built two half-billion
watt laser systems, one of which Kodak has donated to the
National Institute of Health.
The lasers proved unsuccessful in treating cancer, but
we'd make the same decision all over again. We entered laser
technology because we have a stake in business. We let a
young researcher help the medical community look for a
means of cancer treatment because we have a stake in the

ALL MINI-LESSONS HELD AT: U-M STUDENT UNION (Anderson Room)

Monday, October 1-3 p.m. or 7 p.m.
-cr... A... n hnr - :t . ... n - 7 ., ...

Wednesday, October 3-3 p.m. or 7 p.m.
ThrsAO, tnor 4-. nm. or 7 n.m.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan