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October 04, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Yhur$doy,, October 4, 1 x73

i rit MICHIG^N u/AILY

NClt, l'v

.T111 r- d*0 yi l ct* b r I4,1 - ----HC3A- wA-L-i--eI-ly

,:

* 0
f y CHARLES S5TEIN
Temembers ofBig Burger
and The Deltones really love
oldies. They've seen "American
Graffiti" twice and plan to see
it again.
They also sing the rocking
'rhythm and blues of the 50's and
10,s 4s well as any one around.
Not ill the condescending "were-
n't those songs funny" style of
your average band but rather in
the spirit of true oldies aficiana-
d -- people who realize that the
sol~s of that era were simply tre-
rnendous musical creations.
Currently playing in stripped
down form' at the Pretzel Bell
minus their drummer and lead
guitar player, the band has Larry
Warnier on bass, Jonny Robison
on1 rhythm guitar and Al Hill on
.the organ.
The quiet atmosphere of the
bar is responsible for the smaller
band. It also means the group
must stick to more of its older

rgoff
material, leaving out the Stones, l
Motown and Allman Brothers 1
numbers they normally play.
Even without their full instru-
mental power, Big Burger puts s
on a good show. Vocally they are
strong enough to do justice to the
group harmony works of the
Coasters, Drifters and Beach
Boys. Both Warner and Robison
have impressive solo voices and
together the three achieve a
blend that most groups can only
reach in the artificial confines of
a studio.
One song in particular, an ob-
scure Coaster tune called' Wake
Me, Shake Me performed a ca-
pella, should convince any skep-
tics that Big Burger can really
sing.
The band's repetoire is' impres-
sive - covering such well-known
hits as Mustang Sally, Tossin'
and Turnin' and Just Like Romeo
and Juliet as well as a number
of dust-covered flip sides that on-

r

theg
ly true 12&B scholars will remem-
ber.
Credit for these "hidden treas-
ures" goes to Warner, who ac-
cording to Robison has "been
listening to the radio, since he
was two."'
Though the tale is slightly ex-
aggerated, at 26, Warner does re-
member a long way back. From
the days when he slept with a
radio under his pillow he can re-
call both the melodies and lyrics
of songs that were only minor
hits in 56 and 57.
lie also remembers the day
back in 1958 when he purchased
"Short Shorts", his first 45.
The group's members are long-
time inhabitants of the Ann Ar-
bor music scene. Aside from my-
riad appearances on the Diag,
they have performed in a num-
ber of other local bands. Robi-
son, for instance, has at vari-
ous times played with Salama-
gundi, Ragamuffin and Meadow-

"olden

muffin.
The band is currently going into
a month of intensive working ses-
sions to get ready for a Novem-
ber engagement at Bibmo's On
The Hill. They will be. playing
therre with all five members on
weekends for the entire month.
They will also continue their
Sunday to Wednesday stay at
the Pretzel Bell with the pos-
sibility of' having the floor clear-
ed for dancing some time in the
not-too-distant future.
Though the sternly - visaged

o idies
heroes of Michigan football who
glare down from the bar's walls
mlight frowzy on such activity, it
would be a major boon to tlr
city's dance-lovers who have few
places to stretch their legs.
Even confined to chairs, how-
ever, an evening with Big Burger
and The Deltones is a guaran-
teed night of foot-stomping, hand-
clapping, shit-kicking - and as
those football heroes might say
- beautifully conceived and
beautifully executed rock and
roll.

Series Sales Now Ihru Friday!I
Ticket Office open for subscriptions

Thursday and Friday

12:30--5 p.m.

Single Show Sale Begins
Monday, October 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Art fair comitng to
Farmer's Market

By CHIP SINCLAIR
If you wander gown to the Ann
Arbor Farmer's Market Sunday
afternoon, don't expect to see the
usual fruit and. vegetable fare.
Instead, you'll find over 100 ar-
tists and craftspeople selling
their work and demonstrating
their techniques.
Sponsored by the University of,
Michigan Artists and Craftsmen
Guild, the Arts and Crafts Fair
will allow people to participate
in the arts while picking up on
a free lesson in a craft such as
leatherworking, candlemaking, or
pottery.
Although admission is free to
the Guild's last outdoor fair of
the season, those who feel hun-
gry can buy donuts and cider.
From 1 to 7 p.m., artists will
display and sell such diverse ar'-
tidles as stuffed. animals, welded
sculpture, p)ainted Easter eggs,
leaded glass, homemade clothes,
batiks, and Japanese brush paint-
ings.
Each artist is required to pre-
sent some kind of demonstration
of his or her craft or art. If a de-
monstration is not practical, the
artist will present slides, dia-
grams or written explanations of
what is involved in making the
object.
One glass worker who will be
displaying at the fair feels that
one of the fair's most important
aspects is the exchange of ideas
that will take place.
"Many people around Ann Ar-
bor are involved in creating
things at home," she says. "Even

if they are not selling, they want
ideas for their own stuff. The art
fair is a great place to pick up
new ideas,"
She adds that she also bene-
fits from suggestions offered by
interested viewers.
Having sponsored the Free Art
Fair on campus this summer, the
Guild plans a series of future fes-
tivals, including one at the Briar-
wood shopping center in May and
a major event in June in Detroit.
The Guild is a fairly new ad-
dition to campus organizations.
Formed in January of this year,
it now has 280 members from all
over the country. Most members,
however, are from the Ann Arbor
area, and many are students.
In its newsletter the Guild pub-
licizes art fairs which take place
around the country. The Guild
also sponsors art classes in pri-
sons, offers discount prices on
art supplies to its members, and
maintains a store in the Univer-
sity Cellar to sell members'
artwork.
ri sti writingatr
stories a b o u t the
dramra. danc~e, filmn.
arts: Contact Art:
e~ditor, c/o The
Michigan IDaily.

George Bernar Shaw 's
$INIJOAN
directed b Nathan Garner
Oct. 10-13 Power Center
Karl Stemheim's
IIE STRONGBOX
diretedby Donald Boros
Nov.7-10 Mendelsohn
William Shakespeare's
CYIBIUI
directed by William Halstead
Dec. 5-8 Trueblood
Bertolt Brecht's
[0, WARD I I
directed by Richard Burgwin
Feb. 6'9 Power Center

Deify Photo by JE'RRY McCARTHY
Big Burger an4V The D~eltones

J ,
ry
f,
! ;
;
?: p
i -
-e}
yj'.
:
iii

tonilght
6:00 2 4 7 News
$ Ashy Gtfitt
so t lgsss Iis"m
s0 oot
6.350 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
g I Dream of Jeannte
I50 Rogan's Heroes
56 french Chef
7:00 2 Trujth or Consequences
4 News
7 TO Tell The Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 Missiona: Impossible
56 Montage
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 You Asked For It
7 New Treasure Hunt
9 Bewitched~
56 Consumer Buy-Line
$;00 2 The Waltons
4 Flip Wilson
7 Tiua-Crime D~ra ma
Dlebut
9~ Woods and Wheels
56 Advocates
50, Sixth Sense
9:30 9 Oeachconlbers
_ 50 Nero Griffin
4:00 2 Movie
16Tbe Wild Bunch"
4 Irooide
7 KungFu
0 New s
5$ Detroit Black Journal
3:30 9 This Land
56 Woman
10:00 4 ,NBC Follies
7 Streets of San Francisco
9. To See Ourselves
50 Perry Masion

56 To Be Announced
10:30 9 Norman Corwin Presents
rebut :
11:094 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:15 2 NeW's
11:30 4 Johnny Carson
7 Dick Cavett
9 News
50 ;Movie
"Two Flags West," (1950)
11:45 2 Movie
"War of the 'Wildcats." (194:3)
12:00 9 Movie
-Dillinger." (19415)
1:01) 4 7 News
1:45 2 Movie
"Too Many Thieves" (1966)
3:45 Mayberry R.F.D.
4:15 2 News
wwcb n

_ ARTS__

C ULA T URIE CA LE NDAR
FILM-Ann Arbor Film Co-op presents Fellini's Roma in Aud.
A, at 7, 9 p.m.; New World Film Co-op shows Costa Gar-
vas' The Confession at 7, 9:30 p.m. in Aud. 4, MLB; and
Wise's The Andromeda Strain at 7, 9:30 in AudI. 3, MLB;
Cinema Guild features The President Vanishes in Arch,
Aud. at 7, 9:05.
MUSIC-The Bach Club presents a program of Medieval,
Renaissance, Baroque, and modern music including
works by the performers Carol Crawford (mezzo-so-
prano), Kay Walker (mezzo-contralto), and Frank Nez-
wazky (harpsichord). Luscious "quiche" is also featured
at 8 p.m. in Greene Lounge, East Quad.
DANCE-The University Musical Society presents the Ameri-
can Ballet Repertory at Power Center at 8 p.m.
DRAMA-Ann Arbor Civic Theatre performs G. B. Shaw's
"Arms and the Man" at 8 p.m. 4n Mendelssohn.

Sat., Suan. and Wed. at 1. 3.,.5,
79 pim. Other days at 7 & 9 only
is an exquisite
miove.'
-REX REED,
Syndicated Columnist
A NOVEL BY
HE RMANN
HE SSE
A ILM BY
CONRAD
ROOKS
R
Next: "PAYDAY"
acclaimed at cannies fim festival?

7
9
12
6
6:30'
7 :30
11

The Morning Show
Rock
Progressive
Folk, "Rck ;Progressive
News.'Sports,/Comment
Latino-Americano
Jazz'/Blues
Progressive

* NEW WORLD FILM COO P--preents- COSTA GAYRAS who gave us "Z" and "State of Seige" 4
*now gives us: 4
* 4y k nk.:,
'w 4
k J
Anroea tri
* Frm te bst ellr b MicoclCrihto. Tis ecor ofthe"TH CO FES ION
eart's irs bilogcal riss i perha s te mot o theticscince
* fitio thille evr m de, he ndrmedaStrin s baed n M
* Chictn'sbes-selin novl tat reaed atinalparaoiaforitswit -Yvs MO TAN an SioneSIG ORE
* toia4eeac otefrtmo adn.w~ naSna nJnay 91i iesretoatsbol
* 4_r n d s c r r e e o r o t a d d a i w y h n c f e

Docuglaac
Mar.13'

s TL

urner Ward's

P1 BSNG
GUEST ~IRTO

-16

Mendelsohn

Paul Newman i'i
John Huston',
"The Mackin~tosh'
Man" (PG)
Open 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p m.
--STARTS TOMORROW-
"A JOY!I"
-PARAOL;NT P1(11RLS
pneuA SWt PLM
t
OZEfYIRELLI
cJ1ILIET

PREMIERE PERFORMANCE
IN F [RICANCLOCK
directed by Richard D. Meyer
Apr. 24 - 27 Power Center

ADVANCE SALES & INFORMATION
TICKET OFFICE MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

y764-6300

Tfl[11111 RTi I IVE

m

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