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October 03, 1973 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-03

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Vvednesday, pctober 3, 19 13

Page Six THE MICHIGAN L)AILY Wednesday, October 3, 1913

Brown
By MARC FELDMAN
"Basically, the safety is the
last man. I have to get the run-
ner- because if I don't,' there's
nobody left to cover up for me."
-Dave Brown
A football version of the Stra-
tegic Air Command, not quite -
but Michigan safety Dave 'Brown
has been a solid cornerstone of
the Wolverine defense that ledG
the nation in scoring prevention
last year and earned the repu- linebac
tation of "bending but not break- Mutch'
ing." In ft
The 6-1, 188 pound junior .from ler wa
Akron, Ohio has already secured perforn
his spot on the list of great Mich- over M
igan defensive backs in the Rick bubble
Volk - Tom Darden - Randy Lo- the Mi
gan mold with 'an impressive list the bes
of honors under his belt. seen -
Brown was named a Sophomore the pa
All-American in 1972 and gain- Mich
ed All-Big-Ten plaudits from as it r
UPI and the Chicago Tribune, as Brown
well as pre-season All-American toriety
acclaim from Gameplan maga- edge o
zine. And he's just a junior. "I f
Of course, many Michigan fans lyze thl
recall the 68 - yard interception knowir
return' against Minnesota and and ci
the key fumble recovery in Indi- setuph
ana that set up the winning of myl
touchdown, but a true indication Num
of Brown's outstanding play and seconda
his "nose for the ball" can be in one
seen in last year's team tackle backsa
statistics. ubiquil
Even though Michigan ranked ing aw
fifth nationally in pass defense Two
and opponents completed an av- fordq
erage of just seven passes per visited
game, Brown still managed to Cardin
rank third on the team (behind ing ne

shill

daily
ports
NIGHT EDITOR:
GEORGE HASTINGS
ckers Tom Kee and Craig
) in tackles with 73.
act, Coach Bo Schembech-
s so enthused with Brown'st
'mance in the 42-0 victory
Minnesota last year that he
d, "Brown's play against
innesota option -attack was
st safety play I have ever
against both the run and
iss."-
higan's defense, as complex
may be, is successful, and
feels much of his own no-
is attributable to knowl-
f opposing formations.
eel that the ability to ana-
he offensive formations and
ng exactly what a team can
annot do from a particular
is the most important part
position," he explains.
iber Six's prosperity in the
try has backfired on him
way - opposing quarter-
are trying to avoid Brown's
tous presence by throw-
'ay from him.
weeks ago heralded Stan-
quarterback Mike Boryla
Michigan Stadium but the
al slinger shunned throw-'
ar +Brown like the plague.

ie s at
down
I was surprised and a little 'dis-
appointed he didn't throw long.
He stuck mostly to screens and
short over-the-middle stuff. May-
be he was trying to keep the
football away from me."
While dissatisfied that the ac-
tion had gone away from him,
Brown feels the team's overall
defensive play and winning the
game are paramount. "I like be-
ing in the action, but I like win-
hing more."
Brown started out as a quar-
terback' in ninth grade and even
threw eight touchdown passes,
but he was switched to a wide
receiver slot anyway. However,
his favorite position soon became
the defensive backfield.
Although Brown was named
All-Northeast Ohio safety and
Akron Garfield High School com-
piled an impressive 26-4 record
during Dave's t h r e e varsity
years,' most schools, including
Michigan, recruited him as a
wide receiver.
Brown was pursued by a host
of major schools including Kan-
sas State, Iowa State, Notre
Dame, Northwestern, and Ohio
State, but it was, Tom Darden
and Billy Taylor, former Wol-
verine greats and ace Ohio re-
cruiters, who convinced him to
come to Ann Arbor.
"I didn't feel anyone else was
as interested in me as Michigan,"
Brown relates. "The football peo-
ple seem to be more closely knit
here than at some of the other
schools that recruited me."
ThattMichigan defensive unit
is pretty closely knit also.
They're not too far off last year's
points per game pace (with 17
in three games) and one of those
key stitches is Number Six, Mr.
Brown.

SECOND STRAIGHT LOSS:
Reserves improve
in 10-3 loss to Irish

1.

A

By JOHN KAHLER
The Michigan Varsity Reserve
team was better than before but
still not good enough as they lost
a tough 10-3 decision to the Notre
Dame J.V.'s last Monday. Ac-
cording to head coach Dennis
Brown, the Baby Blue outplayed
the Irish all the way, only to lose
on a pair of Irish goalline stands.
On the first play from scrim-
mage, tailback Rob Lytle burst
through the line for a 65-yard
run down to the Notre 'Dame
five. However, Michigan failed to
punch it over from there. "We
sent our best backs at them, but
we just couldn't do it," moaned
Brown.
THE IRISH CAME fighting
back in the second period to take
the lead on a fumble recovery in
the end zone by fullback Kevin
Doherty. His teammate, tailback
Bill Bonder, had fumbled the ball
on the Michigan four, but Do-
herty seized the opportunity and
fell on the bouncing pigskin in
the end zone.
MICHIGAN GARNERED its
only score in the second half as
kicker Bob Wood booted a 22-
yard field goal. On the following
series, the Blue drove to the
Irish five-yard line, but again
c a m e up empty-handed. The
Blue and Gold hit on a 39-yard
field goal to round out the scor-
ing.
All in all, it was a frustrating
trip for the Baby Blue. "We
should have won that game, or
at least tied it," Brown stated

gritting his teeth. "With any luck
at all it could have been 21-10
in our favor."
BROWN HAD ONLY praise for
his defensive unit, which made
a vast improvement over their
performance of a week earlier.
"I believe our defense came of
age out there Monday." He sin-
gled out for praise Michigan's
goalline stand (on an Irish first
and four) and the play of defen-
sive backs Jerry Zuver and Jack
Fairbanks.
THE OFFENSE picked up 217
total yards of which 139 were on
the ground with Lytle leading the
rushing attack with 96 yards. But
the passing attack was a weak
4 for 14, with open receivers fail-
ing to get the ball on several
key occasions.
The V.R.'s have a long layoff
until Oct. 22 when they play host
to Michigan State. The Spartans,
41-3 losers to Ohio State, should
provide the Blue with a chance
at a winning season.

WOMEN'S 4x
BOWLING LEAGUE
NOW FORMING
SIGN UP AT THE
MICHIGAN UNION
BOWLING LANES
OR CALL 662-4431 and
ask for bowling lanes

qSorts of The Daiy.
From wire Service Reports
_Frazier, Ali to meet again
NEW YORK-Madison Square Garden has called a press
conference for noon, EDT, Thursday, giving rise to speculation
that the arena is ready to announce a heavyweight rematch be-
tween Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier.
Frazier, an undefeated champion at their first meeting won
a decision over Ali, who was also unbeaten at the time but
hampered by a layoff due to his battle with the U.S. government
over his refusal to enter the military service.
Since then both have been beaten. Frazier had his title
taken away by George Foreman, who scored a stunning second-
round knockout. Ali lost a decision to Ken Norton but redeemed
the loss with a 12-roundtsplit verdict over Norton last month.
Olympian passes away
HELSINKI-Paavo Nurmi, "The Flying Finn" whose long
distance running exploits in the Golden Twenties made him a
legend, died here last night at the age of 76.
He was the iron'man of his age, winning nine gold medals in
three Olympic Games. He competed in three of the games-
1920, 1924, and 1928-and would have made it to a fourth had
he not been disqualified just prior to the 1932 event on charges
of professionalism.
The charge and the ban embittered the Finnish star, but he
remained a national hero. A statue of him was erected in front
of the stadium which became the scene of the Olympics in 1952
and he was honored on that occasion by being allowed to light
the Olympic flame.
Indiana runner quits
BLOOMINGTON - Indiana University's fullback Ken St.
Pierre has quit the football team so he can concentrate on base-
ball, Coach Lee Corso said yesterday.
St. Pierre, the No. 5 ground gainer in UI history with 1,301
yards, has been the catcher for the Hoosiers' baseball team for
two years.
The Danvers, Mass., native has been used sparingly this
football season and has carried the ball only 15 times for 51
yards.
Stars sue Beaty
SALT LAKE CITY-The Utah Stars of the American Basket-
ball Association filed a breach of contract suit yesterday against
center Zelmo Beaty and his attorney because Beaty hasn't shown
up for preseason work.
Stars President Vince Boryla said Beaty has failed to appear
for training, although he has a valid contract for the 1973-74
season. Beaty has been trying to negotiate a contract for the
1974-75 season.
Gridde Pickings
From the annals of future Libel history ...
NEW YEAR'S DAY, 1974
The Libels break out of the huddle now and line up in the I-
formation. It's Lazy Legs Lisull at quarterback with Happy Hastings
close and Stork Feldman deep. Hooper Crane is split out to the left
and Steely Dan deployed wide to the right.
Lisull takes the snap and fades back to pass. He's got good pro-
tection, sees Tor streaking downfield and throws the HOME RUN
BALL . . . and it's , . CAUGHT by Tor at the 15, down to the ten,
five, TOUCHDOWN, Libels! The score is tied 23-all, with the clock
stopped on the field.
Garo Greer comes in to attempt the extra point, Cornshucker
Stuck in to hold.
The teams are lined up now, and here's the snap-it's spotted,
it's booted, it's up, and it's-
This just in-"Get those picks in to the Daily at 420 Maynard
by midnight Friday. You might -win a free Mr. Pizza pizza.
... and this is Bob Reynolds, along with Van Patrick and Paul

Dailv Photo ov TERRY McCARTHY
SAFETY DAVE BROWN (6) delivers a good shot to Stanford's John Winesberry causing the Cardi-
nal back to cough up the football. Hard-nose play like this is why Brown is an All-American candi-
date as a junior.

"I"Eml

Pitt freshman sensation

DAVID'S BOOKS
663-8441

1

Ned's Bookstore & Student Book Service
(formerly of Ann Arbor)
ANNOUNCE
GIGANTIC WAREHOUSE SALE
OCT. 1-OCT. 19
75,000 TITLES
All Books 506,/ OFF (or more)
THOUSANDS OF TITLES 25c-$1.00
(Would you believe 15c/lb.?)
Text on all sub.: for. long, quality paperbacks, 8-M & Sci.
Amer. Reprints
3800 PACKARD-971-7820
(NEAR CARPENTER)
M-F 10-5 SAT. 10-3

I

runs wild at

Evanston

has m ov e d to Dag (when
worm) & basement 209 S. State
(between State Theatre&
G~no's I
TOLKIEN CALENDERS &r
CASTANEDA'S JOURNEY
TO IXTLAN (PAPERBACK)
25% OFF etc.

By BILL STIEG
"It was the best individual
performance I've ever been
around."
At the rate things are going,
University of Pittsburgh head
football coach Johnny Majors
may be saying that afterjevery
game Tony Dorsett plays in.
Dorsett, a 5-11, 175 pound tail-
back, has begun his freshman
year at Pitt in a way that has
rekindled the flickering h o p e s
about the Panther's future.
In Dorsett's first game, against
Georgia, he rushed for 101 yards
as the game ended in a tie. The
next week he bettered that mark
with 121 yards against Baylor
in a winning effort. And la s t
Saturday he exploded for 265
yards against the Northwestern
Wildcats, scoring twice in a 21-
14 Pitt victory. It was this fan-
tastic performance that prompt-
ed the above statement from
Majors, who has been a major
college coach for 17 years.
Dorsett's longest gain was a
79 yard touchdown run but it
was his other TD scamper that
excited Majors. "One of t h e
best I've seen," stated tke Pitt
mentor. "It was from six

yards out. He was hit at scrim-
mage,.turned completely around,
reversed his field and dragged a
couple tacklers into the end zone
on his own. He runs hard in-
side but has excellent break-
away speed also."
Dorsett went to high school in
Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, about
20 miles from Pittsburgh. A mon-
ster man on defense as a sopho-
more, he switched to tailback
in his last two years and w a s
named schoolboy All-American.

will have their work cut out
for them in the coming months
as they must face stiff competi-
tion in the person of West Vir-
ginia, Notre Dame and P e n n
State.
Majors calls his new-found star
"quiet, soft-spoken and refresh-
ing to be around.. He is a ple.as-
ure to coach. He has as much
poise as any sophomore or jun-
ior I've seen. It will be-hard to
top that performance, but he
has a bright future and will be
an important factor in Pitt's
success."
COME TO THE
MICHIGAN UNION AND
WATCH THE FIRST ANNUAL
Michigan Union
Invitational Straight
Pool Tournament
SUNDAY, OCT. 7
GAMES AT 1, 3,7,9

This honor brought about
heavy recruiting from "75 to
100" schools. But Tony chose
Pitt, despite their 1-10 record
in 1972, because, "There's been
a Major change in Pitt football.
We're starting a 'new thing'
here. We're ,rebuilding and im-
proving. In a couple of years
we'll really be something. I al-
so wanted to stay close to home
and close to my family."
The "new thing" at Pitt in-
cludes 17 other freshmen on the
travelling squad, 12 of which
played last Saturday. But they

M!nerds and the Political Economy
a special course to be offered October-November by
CHARLES F. PARK, JR
U-M Visiting Professor of Geology and
Professor Emeritus, Stanford University
This course will deal with the occurrence, exploitation, and inter-
national flow of mineral resources and the effects of governmental policy
and actions on exploration for futur supplies. Ecological problems asso-
ciated with the mining of these resources will be treated in some depth.
Emphasis will be given to -metal resources and geological fuels as future
sources of materials, and energy.
Classes will be held 12-1 on Wednesday and Friday during October
and November in Room 2501, C.C. Little Science Bldg.
Undergraduates sign up for Univ. Crse. 413, Div. 495, 1 hour credit
on pass-fail basis. Graduates sign up for Geol-Min. 499; Section 029, Div.
377, 1 hour graduate credit.
For further details, contact Dept. of Geology-Mineralogy, Room
1006 C.C. Little Science Bldg.

E/J

Major League Leaders

FINAL
American League
Leading-Batters
g. ab.
Carew, Minn. 149 580
Scott, Mi. 158 604
Davis, Bal. 137 552
Murcer, N.Y. 160 616
May, Mil. 156 624
Munson, N.Y. 141 519
Otis, K.C. 148 583
Yastrzemski, Bos. 152 540
Jackson, Oak. 151 539
Olliva, Minn. 146 571

h.
203
185
169
187
189
156
175
1601
158
166

pct.
.350
.306
.306
.304
.303
.301
.300
.296
.293
.291

c
c
P
7
c
,1

Home RunsI
Jackson, Oak 32; Robinson, Cal and
Burroughs, Tex 30; Bando, Oak 29;
Fisk, Bos, Mayberry and Otis,' KC 26. ;
Runs Batted In_
Jackson, Oak 117; Scott, Ml 107; May-
berry, KC 100; Bando, Oak 98; Robin--
son, Cal 97.
Pitching
Wood, Chi 24-20; Coleman, Det 23-15;
Palmer, Bait 22-9; Hunter, Oak 21-5;{
Holtzman, Oak 21-13; Ryan, Cal 21-16.
National League
Leading Batters
g. ab. h. pct.
Rose, Cin. 160 680 230 .339
Cedeno, Hou. 139 525 168 .320
Maddox, S.F. 144 587 187 .319
Perez, Cin. 151 564 177 .314
Watson, Hou. 158 573 179 .312

Simmons, St.L. 161 619 192 .310
Cardenal, Chi. 145 522 158 '.303
Singleton, Mtl. 162 560 169 .302
Matthews, S.F. 148 540 162 .300
Garr, Atl. 148 668 200 :299
Stargell, Pitt. 148 521 156 .299
Home Runs
Stargell, Pitt 44; Johnson, AtI 43;
Evans, Ati 41; Aaron, AtI .40; Bonds,
SF 39.
Runs Batted In
-Stargell, Pitt 119; May, Hou 105;
Evans, Ati andBench, Cin 104;-Single-
ton, Mtl 103.
Pitching
Bryant, SF 24-12; Billingham, Cin and
Seaver, NY 19-10; Gullett, Cin 18-8;
Sutton, LA 18-10.
SHOP AT
frboks and supplies

TRAINING
1. Pilots needed for C9B3, P3C,
and FJ4A
2. Starting Salaryupto 12,000
per year
3. Complete Benefit Package
4. Eyesight Waivers to 20/200
for FlightOfficers

I

History Enthusiasts!
WHAT DO CHARLEMAGNE, MATA HARI AND
HISTORY UNDERGRAD ASSOCIATION HAVE IN
COMMON?.
If you answered "They're all dead." You're wrong.
The HISTORY UNDERGRAD ASSOCIATION is alive
and meeting in 1412 MASON HALL

5.

Pay Bonus for Undergiads

I

Fnr fiirthAr in nrmritinn CAP LT J;m

U

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