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October 02, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-02

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Tuesday, October 2, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

I

Prosecutors

race

time

inc

Agnew
WASHINGTON (P) - Federal
prosecutors are racing the calen-
dar to wind up their probe of
Spiro T. Agnew before statutes
of limitations run out on alleg-
ed crimes for which the v i c e
president is being investigated.
Legal arguments may be made
that the statutes on at least some
of the alleged crimes expire in
as little as three weeks, it was
learned yesterday.
Agnew is under investigation
by a special federal grand jury
in Baltimore for possible viola-
tion of bribery, extortion, tax and
conspiracy laws while governor

bribery investigation

Audiences are standing
up and applauding ...
WALKING
TALL
"Might just turn out to be
this year's sleeper and
emulate the runaway
success of 'BILLY JACK'."
-Kevin Thomas, L.A. Times

"WALKING TALL" Is based
on the true story of a young
man who wouldn't surrender to
the system.

I

I

of Maryland.
Under federal law, prosecution
for bribery and extortion must
be initiated within five years of
the commission of the crime. Af-
ter five years, no legal action
can be taken. The statutes of li-
mitations on tax evasion and tax
fraud are six years.
The statutes on- conspiracy to
commit bribery or extortion are
five years; on conspiracy to com-
mit tax evasion or fraud, six
years.
On Oct. 22, the Maryland State
Board of Public Works held its
last major session before Agnew

left the office of governor. At
that session, seven major en-
gineering contracts were award-
ed totalling more than 5.6 mil-
lion.
These contracts involved con-
struction of approaches to the
Chesapeake Bay Bridge and the
Baltimore Outer Harbor Tun-
nel, the two major projects to be
financed out of a $220 million
bond issue. All records involving
these contracts have been sub-
poened by the Baltimore grand
jury.
Should the panel wish to indict
Agnew for extortion, bribery cr
conspiracy to commit either of
those crimes in connection with
the Oct. 22, 1968 awards, Agnew's
lawyers reportedly are consider-
ing an argument that the indict-
ment cannot be returned after
Oct. 22, 1973 - five years after
the meeting, sources close to the
case reported.
By that reasoning, however, the
prosecutors should have until
Oct. 22 of next year to pursue al-
legations of violation of tax laws,
the sources said.
It is known that the prosecutors

in Baltimore are moving as
quickly as possible to present evi-
dence to the grand jury.
Crucial to that effort was the
ruling last week by U.S. Dist.
Court Judge Walter E. Hoffman
that the grand jury investigation
may continue while Agnew's law-
yers and the Justice Department
battle in court over the grand
jury's constitutional right to in-
vestigate a sitting vice president.
Should the grand jury fail to
act by this Oct. 22 and should the
Justice Department wish to pur-
sue the extortion-bribery lines of
inquiry, prosecutors could argue
that the statutes of limitations
did not start to run until the day
Agnew left the governor's office
- Jan. 7, 1969 - or even until
Agnew took office as vice pres-
ident - Jan. 20, 1969. That would
mean that statutes wouldn't run
out until January of 1974.
CATFISH LURE
DALLAS, Tex. (UPI) - Wild-
life studies show that catfish will
congregate in discarded rubber
tires if stock ponds are otherwise
void of natural hiding places.

STARTS FRIDAY
Program Information 434-1782
3020 Washtenaw
Between Ann Arbor
and Ypsilanti

I

I

m

Chilean junta takes
control of education

W.C. FIELDS
IN
THE BANK DICK
FIELDS as the original tricky dick, a bank detective who foils a
robbery through no fault of his own.
SHORTS: Buster Keaton's HAUNTED HOUSE
W.C. Field's IF I HAD A MILLION
WED.: Ozu's LATE SPRING
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
CINEMA G IL TONIGHT Adm.$1
at7&9:05 -

Behind bars
Donald H. Segretti talks with newsmen outside U.S. Disti
in Washington after pleading guilty to three charges of
Federal election laws. (See Today, P. 1).
APPROPRIATIONS INTACT:
Senate weapons
cuts overseas troc

WASHINGTON - The Senate
yesterday approved a 20.9 billion
dollar military weapons bill
providing for cuts in U. S. troop
strength overseas.
The vote was 91 to 7.
Final passage, following a week-
long debate, came shortly after
the Senate voted against a last-
minute attempt to cut 500 mil-
lion dollars from the bill as part
of a bipartisan liberal effort to
divert some spending from wea-
pons to. education, health and
other domestic programs.
The Senate first voted 51 to 47
for the cut. But then by an identi-
cal 51 to 47 margin, but with
some senators switching sides,
the Senate voted "No" when a
roll call was required under
Senate procedures to lock the cut
into the bill.
The bill now goes before a joint
mittee with the House of Repre-
sentatives, and a behind-the-
scenes battle is expected over
the troop cut issue.
The Senate approved last week
an amendment calling for the
United States to reduce its mili-
tary force of 564,000 men over-
seas by 110,000 by the end of
1975.
The Senate also approved an
amendment which would pro-
vide for cuts in the force of 300,-
000 servicemen stationed in
Western Europe if the NATO al-
liance failed to help offset fur-
ther the costs of maintaining U.S.
troops in Europe.
The more conservative House is
much less likely than the Senate
to approve such amendments.
Even if it did, President Nixon
could still veto the defense bill
as part of his stand to keep the
U. S. Force overseas intact.
The Administration maintains
it would weaken the U. S. posi-
tion in its attempts to negotiate
a balanced and mutual reduction
of forces by the NATO and War-
saw Pact powers if there was
TiIE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 23
Tuesday, October 2, 193
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).
"RALPH BAKSHI'S I D E A OF
MERGING REAL CHARACTERS
INTO CARTOONS AND VICE-
VERSA IS DONE WITH BRIL-
LIANCE! STUNNING POWER."
--Archer Winsten,
New York Post
MORE SPICE ..from the
makers of "'Fritz The Cat"

a cut in U. S. troops at
The conference comn
be dominated by senior
of the Armed Services
tees of both houses,
erally support the Nix
istration. But Senate D
leaner Mike Mansfield
ing advocate of troopr
yesterday publicly rem
Senators they are ex
fht f fr the Senate p
The Senate bill wou
withdrawal of 110,000 1
U. S. troops from ove
tions by Dec. 31, 1975,
40,000 by June 30, 19
would require a reduct
100 in the overall ac
strength of the Army,
Air Force by next June
Bot houses approved
lion for continuing thel
celerated schedule fo
ment and constructiont
dent submarine system
ing the first fully equ
marine in 1978.

SANTIAGO (Reuter) - The
ruling military junta in Chile yes-
terday launched a campaign to
_ <offset any ideological influence
the ousted government of the
late leftwing President Salva-
dor Allende might have had on
educational systems throughout
the country.
Authorities of state and private
schools, where activities were re-
sumed today for the first time
rict Court since the bloody coup which end-
violating ed with Dr. Allende's death al-
most three weeks ago, were told
the withdraw all text books tend-
ing to influence pupils towards
"certain ideologies."
Following instruction from Ed-
ucation Minister Hugo Castro
Jimenez, classes commenced to-
'ill day with special ceremonies in
which headmasters and head-
mistresses called for unity and
brotherhood among all Chileans
and lectured students on the
changes introduced in educational
this time. systems.
mittee will All subjects aimed at politic-
members ally influencing students were
s Commit- also to be suspended and re-
who gen- placed by others aimed at "im-
on Admin- proving their knowledge of Chile-
Democratic an history and geography," Rear
d, a lead- Admiral Castro Jimenez ordered.
reductions, Activities were resumed in pri-
minded the mary and high schools but not
xpected to in the universities where the
osition. four-man junta has ordered an
ild require overall reorganization as well as
land based -- ________
erseas sta-
including OPEN 12:45
74. It also SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
ion of 156,-
ctive duty
Navy and
30.
d $1.5 bil-
Navy's ac-
r develop-
of the Tri-
a, complet-
ipped sub- - - - -

the drafting of a new university
law.
Night school students, however,
will have to attend classes during
the late afternoon and Saturdays
because of an eight-hour curfew
enforced nightly from 10 p.m.
The junta, which includes the
commanders of the three armed
forces and of the Carabineros
paramilitary police, have accus-
ed Dr. Allende's Popular Unity
Coalition government of leaving
Chile in a state of "economic
stagnation."
Senor Andres Zauschkevic, the
new Deputy Chairman of the
State Copper Corporation (CO-
DELCO), which controls produc-
tion in Chile's five large copper
mines formerly owned by U. S.
companies and nationalized by
the Allende regime in 1971, yes-
terday accused the ousted gov-
ernment of bringing the copper
industry to the brink of chaos.
Zauschkevic told miners in the
Northern Chuquicamata copper
mine that 650 million dollars in-
vested by Chile to increase cop-
per output by almost 50 per cent
had failed to produce its effects
because of inefficient manage-
ment.
The investment made between
1965 and 1970 was aimed at in-
creasing copper output from 750,-
000 to 1,100,000 metric tons per
annum by 1971-1972.
But during 1971-72 production
barely reached 718,000 tons, Zau-
schkevic said.

PANDORA PUTS A LITTLE COLOR IN YOUR LIFE gm
HEATHER COLORS -
FOR FA LL '73
... .:{ .. t-..
2N RPandora's heathery, plaid flair
leg pant of spun polyester aCCents
~fowery.print pOly/COtton shirt.
Top it off with an Orion-
heather baby cable sip-on.
A"window-pane" jacquard
sleeveless slip-on and
both of easy care Orlon,
atop heather trousers
of spun polyester.
\ Pants, shirt-Junior 5-15
Sweaters-JuniorS, M, L
TOPS-$1.OO
$14.OO.-$20.OO
t \
t A"widowpae" acqa\
\ leeesslpo n

1U T : i"" iii i A Vi :

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