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September 28, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-09-28

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Friday, September 28, 1 73

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

racge Ihree

Ex- Chilean

fl~

'7l

governor

AP Photo
Soldier's pet
A monkey sits on the shoulders of two Cambodian government soldiers taking a break during opera-
tins aimed at reopening Route 1 southeast of Phnom Penh. Meanwhile, at least 20 communist and
non-aligned countries yesterday were planning to ask the United Nations General Assembly to oust the
Cambodian delegation and replace it with one loybit to Prince Norodom Sihanouk who heads a Peking-
based government in exile. The action followed Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim's refusal to comply
with a request by the prince to submit an item on the question to the assembly agenda.
NA RROW VOTE:

shot
SANTIAGO, Chile (P -
ing squad executed the
leftist governor of Talca
day after he was convic
killing a policeman and a
ing to blow up a dam.
The victim was identif
themilitary government
man Castro Rojas. He w'
first high official of the
regime of President Sa
Allende to go before a
squad.
MEANWHILE, military
ities relaxed a strict
leaving Chileans free fo
first time since the coup
eveningmstrolls and go
dinner.
The curfew, enforced b
iers and police with subn
guns, had emptied S
streets daily at 8 p.m.,
than the normal Chilean
hour. Yesterday it was
back to 10 p.m., a maj
toward normalizing life
battered capital.
The military governme
tinued to raid homes, offi
factories in a hunt for poc
leftist resistance. But the
junta sought to assure C
that everything is in ord
"LABOR ACTIVITIES
'tally normalized in the co
said a communique issued
junta's Labor Ministry,
The junta, which seize
er violently from Marxis
dent Salvadore Allende,
Iannounced that beef wi.
available in Santiago
shops this weekend.
Santiago residents ha
-
-r
-
4
-s
-f

by firing squad
A fir- been able to buy beef, except on ciency and corruption in Allen-
former the black market, for months. de's government were the cauie>,
yester- Long lines formed daily for buy- Carlos Hohmann, a retired gov-
cted of ing other scarce items such as ernment employe who opposed
ttempt- bread, cigarettes and cooking Allende, said that since the coup
oil. there has been a "fundamental
:ied by THE OUSTED ALLENDE gov- difference in the distribution of
as Ge-
as the eminent had blamed the short- food. There is more abundance."
former ages on right-wing sabotage, But breadlines still can b_
lvadore while anti-Marxists said ineffi- seen around the city,
firing
author- oie Union lanches
curfew,SoitU inlu ce
r the
out to l to ed space isstoy

,
4
1
F

v sold-
nachine
antiago
earlier
dinner
moved
or step
in this
nt con-
ces and
ckets of
ruling
hileans
der.
are to-
untry,"
I by the
d pow-
t Presi-
also
ill be
butcher
ve not

MOSCOW i - The Soviet Un-
ion launched its first m a n n e d
space flight in more than two
years yesterday sending t w o
cosmonauts on a testtmission
in a new Soyuz craft that was
powered into earth orbit.
The Soyuz 12 spaceship was
launched on a two-day flight from
the Soviet space center at Bai-
konur on the Kazakhstan plains
in central Asia, Tass news
agency announced.
THE CRAFT IS an "improved"
version of the Coyuz ship in
which three cosmonauts were
killed at the end of the last man-
ned Soviet mission in 1971.
The previous Soyuz 11 mission
ended in disaster on June 30,
1971, when the three-man crew
died on return to earth because
the craft's hatch failed to close
properly after undocking from the

orbiting Salyut space laboratory.
The Soyuz craft was sent back
for redesign. Last April the Sov-
iets launched another space lab
and planned to send a new man-
ned Soyuz vehicle to dock with
it.
BUT THE ORBITING labora-
tory broke up in space and the
manned mission was scratched.
Tass said the cosmonauts would
make spectrographic studies of
various sections of the earth to
obtain "data for the solution of
economic problems." It did not

i

i

Navy bi
WASHINGTON R) - The Sen-
ate refused yesterday to block the
Navy's full speed ahead schedule'
for development and production of
A $13 billion fleet of Trident sub-
marines.
By a 49 to 47 vote, the Senate
turned down an amendment to a
$21 billion weapons authorization
bill to stretch out production two
yeart and delay completion of the
first of 10 of the larger vessels by
tw6 years.
TlE NAVY proposes to get the,
first of the 540-foot submarines,
'equipped with a new longer range

Lidget cuts nixed

IF

elaborate.

CYY.YYYY]YYY Y Y Y Y Y s.Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y YY Y Y cYYYYYYYYYYYYYYli

*****x*

4,000-mile Trident missile, ready
for launching by 1978.
At the White House, deputy pressl
secretary Gerald Warren s a i d1
President Nixon was "extremely,
gratified" with the rejection of the
Trident amendment. Warren also
restated the President's delight
with the defeat of a move Wednes-,
day to cut U.S. troop strength in'
Europe.
The Trident slowdown was pro-
posed by Sens. Thomas J. McIn-
tyre, (D-N.H.), and Peter H. Dom-
inick, (R-Colo.), senior members
of the Senate Armed Services sub-
committee on research and de-!

i)
,i
t
t
:l
s
i
,
1

Sen. Henry M. Jackson, (D-
Wash), defended the accelerated
Navy schedule as justified both
from the standpoint of cost and
the threat of recent Russian suc-
cesses in nuclear weapon t e c h-
nology.
On the roll call, 19 Democrats
and 30 Republicans supported the
Trident speedup - a high priority
item in this year's Nixon adminis
tration military budget. Ten Re
publicans and 37 Democrats voted
for the slowdown.
The McIntyre-Dominick amend
ment would have trimmed $885.4
million from this year's $1.5 bil
lion budget for the Trident sys
tem.
hio

THPL MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 20 velopnment.
Friday, September 28, 19at THEY ARGUED that the Navy
ii editid And managed by students At plan to pull all 10 Trident sub-
t.t Uiiverstty of Michigan. News phone marines under construction before
*0-6362. Second class postage paid atmaneudrcosutinbfe
Anti Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published; the first one can be tested in oper-
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning ation risks, without military jus-
during the University year at 420 May- tificatiop, costly engineering er-
40id Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
!u69cr1ptiOn rates: $10 by carrier (cam-; rors.
1us arti); $11 local mail (Michigan and McIntyre referred the Senate to
7ki,); $12 non-local mail (other- states
*Ad 16rtign). cost overruns on the abandoned'
umtntr session published Tuesday Cheyenne Helicopter and the F111
thrbu b Saturday morning. Subscrip- and C5A militar aircraft as ex
tiod rites: $5.50 by carrier (campusa
itei); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and amples of proceeding with pro-
6iW); $7.00 non-local mail (other duction before research, develop-
stiteS and foreign). ment and testing is completed.
2nd HIT WEEK!
Fy. Open 6:45. Shows at 7 & 9. Sat. & Sun. at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9_ _

* TT +TTF Ff F F F ++aa1 K K F ++FF i F + F # +fF a+afiF aF
* NEW WORLD MEDIA * * INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES * * Program No. 1
* k y
*4k
*A
* 4K
FEATUjRING"
* THE DISPOSSESSED LITTLE WHITE
* .S.. 1370. Produced by George Rallis, Maia Sorotor,
* JudyWhalley and Peter Rand; songs and music byS
Buffy Saint Marie and Talbert Wilson. 33 minutes,
* color and sepia. English language. SETTLEM ENT
* a visually and sociologically powerful film
'F . . , highlights the two most basic problems facing U.S., 1372. Directed by Harry Dawson, jr.; written by
* almost all of the Indian tribes in the contemporary Leo Alexander (Yakima Indian tribe); narrated by
* UnitedStates: super-economic exploitation by a Deni Leonard (Warm Springs Indian tribe). 30 min-
* parasiti, corporation-controlled economy, and pow~ tes, color. English language.°k
* eriessness before the police and legal apparatus of A documentary on American Indian life, past and k
* the state and federal governments. A daring night present, in the Pacific Northwest. Produced, in co- '
* assault of two hundred Pit River Indians on native
lands 'illegally occupied' by the Pacific Gas and opersast ioithaimaeIn ianthrepfilminte
* Electric Company in Shasta County, northern Cali- Ind ian s rs n a y terulwih ae ps o r tsonth
* fomfrsteseai nwihteetee nias rsn-a tugeoe ihn ihso K
ar devostdn..h s h s the Columbia River between Oregon and Washing-
Ston. Although the Indians have lived by the river
*for thousands of years and practiced natural con- k
nervation, they are now fighting attempts by Oregon I
*and Washington to regulate Indian fishing rights,
giving economic advantage to commercial fisheries.
SPEAKER LITERATURE MUSIC
TONIGHT ONLY UNDER GRAD LIBRARY NO ADMISSION
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM, 3rd floor
8 aa U of M Central Campus CHuAlRGE
* . . h~t ihights he t wo most bas~rinr>r~ ic p rob #> ing U r* 1 s.' r t1972. Dk* *ir tl y HkarykDawson jrk , w ritenylr'kyi#
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TH URSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1972

"a dream of exotic
beauty"
-LEO LERMAN,
--Mademoiselle

"impossibly beautiful
. . . visually exquisite!"
-BERNARD DREW,
Gannett News Service

Ig I' II ~: Ii I

A NOVELBY HERMANN HESSE /
A FILM BY CONRAD ROOKS
:4 w universly

I

From COLLMA PTUR[S5

IRISH SONGS
AND HUMOR
1411 Dill STRHET
WK1458

I

U '- ,~ I

mediatrics
presents
THE GRADUATE
7:00 and 9:30
Fri. Sat. Nat. Sci. Aud.
$1.00
Coming Thurs., Oct. 4-BULLITT
THE FELLINI FESTIVAL
IVITELLONI
As with his other early films, Fellini
explores the meaning under the real-
ity in I Vitelloni. Of it, he said, Life
must have meaning beyond the an-
imal"
He portrays five such animals-young
men who live on the physical level-
and reveals their foolish ambitions as

NOW SHOWING 7, 8:20, 9:40
"See the Movie! 'Heavy Traffic' is the most ingen-
ious combination I've ever seen, an amalgam of
cartoon and live film. A highly subjective view of
New York low life as seen by brilliant young car-
toonist Ralph Bakshi. It's fascinating and high
spirited."
- Kevin Sanders, WABC-TV
"Ralph Bakshi's idea of merging real characters
into cartoons and vice-versa is done with brilliance!
Visuals of undeniably stunning power."
Archer Winsten, New York Post
"'Heavy Traffic' may be one of the greatest Amer-
ican films in years! It is, undeniably, a history mak-
ing film. It's rated 'X,' baby, but so is life!"
Tony Russomanno, WXLO
"This is an artist's use of animation to the Nth_
power, expressing social viewpoint. Bakshi molds
animation to new heights of social comment. More
moments of brilliance, power, and depth than in
'Fritz The Cat.' "
---William Wolf, Cue Magazine
w e Spice...from the
makers of Fritz The Cat"
.rw4- .. .Heavy
4.BEd 04ai

By VINCENT CANBY
Francois Truffauts "Two Eng-
lish Girls" is a film of such
beautiful, charming and comic
discretion that it isn't until the
end that one realizes it's also
immensely sad and even brutal,
though in the nonbrutalizing
way that truth can sometimes
be.
The film was shown last night
at the New York Film Festival
at Alice Tully Hall and opens its
commercial engagement Sunday
at the Fine Arts Theater, where.
I trust, it will remain through
Thanksgiving. Christmas and be-
yond.
The source material is "Les
nux Anglaises et Le Continent."
the second novel by Henri-Pierre
Roche, who didn't get around to
wri'ing his first until he was
74. That was "Jules et Jim,"
which Truffaut adapted into his
finest film in 1961.
A bit too much will probably
be made of the fact that "Two
English Girls" reverses the cen-
cntral situation- of "Jules Sand
Jim," in which the twoheroes
spend their lives being turned
on and off by the liberated
Catherine.
The new film, like the earlier
one, is set largely in an unde-
fined past-that is, sometime in
pre-W~orld War I. Paris. though
the exact time is left fuzzy, as
tines usually are in fables. In-
stead of two young men, the
victims (who are in great meas-
ure the mistresses of their fates)
are two propereEnglish girs, sis-
ters, who share a profound at-
tachment for the same young
Frenchman.
In many wave, however. "Two
English Girls" is more closP'v
linked to such lateri-and '
similar) Truffaut films as'"
Soft S k i n." "Mississippi Mer-
maid" and 'Stolen Kisses," each
a variation on the conflict be-
twten a love that is obsessive
sometimes called pure) and a

Film Festival: A Gem From Truffaut

a film in color by Francois Truffaut
AREA PREMIERE! Auditorium "A", Angell Hall
LAST THREE DAYS!
Evenings 7 & 9 p.m -Admission $1.50
Weekend Motinees 1 & 3 p.m--Admission $1.00
ANN ARBOR FILM COOPERATIVE CINEMA I

THE CAST
TWO ENGLISH GIALS (I.ES
DEUXEANGLAISES ET LE
CONTINENT), directed by
Francois Truffaut; screenplay
in French (with English sub-
titles) and English by Mr.
Truffaut and Jean Gruault,
based on the novel by Henri-
Pierre Roche; music, Georges
Delerue: director of photog-
raphy, Nestor Almendros; pro-
duced by Claude Miler: a Films
du Carosse-Cinetel production.
released by Janus Films. Run-
ning time: 108 minutes. Shown
last night at the New York
Film Festival at Alice Tully
Hall; opens Sunday at the Fine
Arts Theater, 58th Street near
Lexington Avenue. This film
has not been classified.
Claude Roe .. Jean-Pierre Leaud
Anne Brown .... Kika Markham
Mrs. Brown .... Sylvia Marriott
Mine. Roc .... Marie Mansart
Diur'a .... Philippe Leofard
Ruta............Irene Tune
Mr. Flint.....Mark Peterson
The Palmist .... David Markham
occupied by not only the ex-
tremely complicated moral bar-
riers to love, but also by the
physical impediments.

manages to look like both Queen
Elizabeth and C a t h e r i n e De-
neuv, rbehaves like a princess in
a fairv tale. She hides behind
dark glasses. as if she had suf-
fered a wicked enchantment, and
says such things as "I want all
of Claude or nothing. If it's no,
let it be like death."
''he film covers seven years in
the lives of the curious trio,
muen of it as if the film were
the daily our n a I that was
Roche's favorite literary form.
The s c e n e s are sometirnes so
sho'vt they are almost subliminal,
with the voice of the narrator
tTruffaut) often supplying a
text. Purists, I expect, will again
object to this tampering with
the accepted relationship be-
tween image, which the purists
think is paramount. and word,
which has always been thought
to be a lesser tool in cinema.
The effect. nevertheless, is
lovely. and even appropriate,
since fables begin with spoken
'vords The performances are
fine. Leaudi may well be - as
Truffaut cells hin--the greatest
Fren:J'i actor of his generation.
At least I thinlk that explains
why he seemed so off-putting--
w h i c h he was supposed to-in
"Bed and Board" and here, as
the earnestly free-loving rake, so
appealing.
The film is filled with wonder-

Sinend an cheapnnight (or afternoon)

with Woody

I i

I

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