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September 26, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-26

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Wednesday, September 25, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

gage Five

Wednesday, September 26, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~-'age Five~

Iuldaur:

Spirited,

sensuous singer

By DIANE LEVICK
Arts Editor
Some have called her act
"sleezy." Rolling Stone .heralded
her new album as "a glorious
breakthrough." And the Ark's
audience sat with eyes glued on
up-and-coming singer M a r i a
Muldaur last weekend as she
shook and swayed her way into
their hearts.
No newcomer to show business,
the 31 year-old Muldaur says "A
little sleeze is comfortable." In
a tight gray skirt and halter top
she belts out country, blues,
and pop numbers - pratically all
containing marvelously sugges-
tive if not blatantly sexual ly-
rics.
Offering professional insight on
the difficulties of her vocals, Mil-
daur says, "There's nothing like
having a few belts before you
go on and having 'to belch all set
and phrase around it."She must
have mastered that art, for she
delivers her material with 'a uni-
que, pure voice that seems to
glide from octave to octave.
Backed up on tour by piano,
bass and lead guitars, Muldaur
likes to "really put it on." As
she squeezes every bit of sen-
suality out of the lyrics, h e r
grinning husband accompanies
her on the piano.
His amused, knowing look
brings to mind Ike Turner's coun-
tenance as he watches T i n a
bring the auditorium to a full
.wcbn

boil.
A former member of the Even
Dozen and Jim Kweskin Jug
Bands, Muldaur now boasts a re-
pertoire from Dolly Parton's "In
My Tennessee Mountain Home'
(This is a tune about nirvana")
to "Won't You Be My Chauf-
feur?": "I want you to ride me,
baby . . . You ride so easy,
I can't turn you down."
Although she doesn't write her
own material now, Muldaur as a
teenager wrote "about 18 re-liv
good rock and roll songs - goad
for that time anyway."
"I had a group in high school
called the Cashmeres," she ex-
plains. "We wore tight white
sweaters, tight black skirts --
and we cut class and sang in the
girls' bathroom."
But shortly after she cultivated
the rock and roll greaser image,
she turned on to "pure country
music."
"At 18 I first heard Doc Wat-
son and went wild for him, ' she
says of the fine country picker.
"I became a mad groupie for hi;
65 year-old father" (a musican
too).
Without formal musical train-
ing, Muldaur did manage to pick
up some fiddling, which she still
uses in her act. Her teenage en-
thusiasm for songwriting, how-
ever, didn't 'last.
"I must have had a fit of self-
consciousness or something," she
says. "It just doesn't come easy
to me."
Certainly not as easily as the
sensual banging of her tambour-
ine. Or her proud, spirited stamp-
ing to "I'm a Woman," the song
by which many - feminis's in
particular - remember her from
the Jim Kweskin days.
Ironically but predictably writ-
ten by men, "I'm a Woman" ly-
rics boast of a Superhousewilo-

type who can accomplish an in-.
ordinate amount of cooki1g and
cleaning and who can "jump in
bed at 5, get up at 6 and
start all over again."
To the nearest male, Mildaur
directs the last verse: "I can
make a dress out of a feed bag
and make a man out of YOU."
"You know it's funny," Mul-
daur reminisces. "But it was
10 years ago that I started sing-
ing that song. I was 21 at the
time and had just started living
with Geoff. I really tried to ful-
fill everything in that song
"And then last winter I was
in LA oin my own. This women's
group said they wanted to do a
poster with a quote fr)m t h e
'Woman' song. They said they
felt it represented certain joy-
ous, positive things about being
a woman."
Subsequently, Muldaur felt she
saw the-song "in a new iigh*."
Recalling the line in the tune
about greasing a car, she ex-
plains, "The song says I can do
everything." So she views iit as
a proclamation of self-reliance
instead of a glorification of the
enslaved housewife.
"When I was in Cambridg2 "
she continues, "a woman pointed
out to me that in none of my
songs.does the woman take the
victim stance."
Hell, her songs either p o s e
straightforward invitations or
put down the proverbial foot, as
in "Don't You Feel M , Leg":
Don't you feel my leg, don't
you feel my leg
'Cause if you feel my leg,
you'll want to feel my thigh,
And if you feel my thigh,
you'll want to go up high ...
Sorry to leave yan hanging
on her thigh. But if you want to
know Muldaur any better
Shoot the Piano Playr!

I

Woody Allen Festival
3 of his greatest hits
TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN
7 p.m.
PLAY IT AGAIN SAM
8:30 p.m.
BANANAS
10:00 P.m.
TRIPLE FEATURE!!
EMU Major Events Committee
PRESENTS:
SHACONA-
October 13
Bowen Field House
TICKETS ON SALE WED., SEPT. 26
$4.00 advance, $5 at the door
general admission
TICKETS ON SALE at: Hudson's, AA Music Mart,
Grinnells, Huckleberry Party Store, McKenny Union

Daily Photo by TOM GOTTLIEB

Maria Muldaur

Art Assoc. films feature
works of pioneering painters

I

By EILEEN LOEHER
Do you know as much as you
would like to know about art?
Whether you are an art en-
thusiast or have just a casual in-
terest in impressionist and ear-
ly modern painting, you should
find "Pioneers of Modern Paint-
ing" a. film series much worth
your while.
The series will cover the works
te
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Andy Griffith
,50 Gilligan's Island
56 Taking Better Pictures
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
91 Dream of Jeannie
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Guten Tag Wei Geht
6:45 56 German Film
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell theTruth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 Mission: Impossible
56 Vince Lombardi Scienes ant
Art of Football
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Sale of the Century
7 Wait Till Your Father Gets
Home
9 Bewitched
56 Consumer Game
8:00 2 Sonny and Cher
4 Adam-12
7 Bob and Carol and Ted and
Alice
9 The Tribe that Hides from Man
8:30 4 Bob Hope
7 Movie
"Hijack"
9 News
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Cannon
9 Ian Tyson
50 Night Gallery
56 Together: A Chuck Manglone
Concert

of EdouArd Manet and P a u 1
Cezanne on Monday, October 1;
Claude Monet and Georges Seu-
rat on Monday, Oct. 8; and Hen-
ri Rousseau and Edvard Munch
on Monday, Oct. 15.
The Monday showings will be
repeated on each following Wed-
nesday evening; Oct. 3, 10 and
17. A showing will be presented
each evening at 7 and 9. All
9:30 4 Faraday and Company
56 Man Builds, Man Destroys
-Ecology
10:00 Z Dan August
7 Owen Marshall
9 The Pipes-Music
50 Perry Mason
56 Homewood
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 one Step Beyond
11:30 2 Movie
"So1 Madrid" (1968)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Alan King at the Indiana
State Fair
9 News
50 Movie-Comedy
"The Strawberry Blonde."
(1941)
12:00 9 Movie
"The Guy Who Came Back."
(1951)
1:00 4 7 News
1:20 2 Movie-Western
"A Pistol for Ringo."
(Italian; 1966)
2:50 2 Mayberry R.F.D.
3:20 2 News

showings will be in the Modern
Languages Building.
The series was written and nar-
rated by Sir Kenneth Clark, the
originator of the highly acclaim-
ed series, "Civilization".
"It seems to be one of the
best of its kind," acknowledges
Professor George Bayliss, one
of the co-ordinators of the p-o-
ject' in the department of art of
the College of Architecture and
Design. "I would certainly have
faith in anything that Sir Ken-
neth Clark would do," he says.
Sponsors of the series besides
the department of art of Archi-
tecture and Design inclade the
Ann Arbor Art Association, the
Friends of the U-M Museum of
'Art and the University Extension
Service.
"We hope to have some siin-
ilar future plans if this is "i suc-
cess," says Jean Amick, a co. o-
dinator of the Ann Arbor A r t
Center. "We were happy about
the amalgamation of the Uni-
versity with the Arts Association.
If we can do things togeth.-r, we
can bring more top notch arts
to Ann Arbor!"

7:00
9:00
12:001
11:001
6:00
6:30'
7 :30
11:001
3:00

The Morning Show
Rock
Progressive
Folk/Rock/Progressive
News/Sports/Comment
Talkback
Jazz/Blues
Progressive
Signoff

L. _. _..._ _._

FILM-Cinema Guild presents Fellini's Variety Lights in
Arch. Aud. at 7, 9:05 tonight. New World Film Co-op pre-
sents Little Murders in MLB Aud. 3 at 7:30, 9:30 tonight.
Truffaut's Two English Girls is showing at Aud. A Angell
presented by Cinema II and AA Film Co-op.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC-Flute Student Recital, SM Recital' Hall,
today at 2. University Choir, Maynard Klein, conductor,
in Hill at 8 tonight.

ENDS TODAY
BURT REYNOLDS IN
"WHITE LIGHTNING" (PG)
OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1,3, 5, 7,9 p.m
STARTS THURSDAY
She's 6 feet 2" of
Dynamite!

* NEW WORLD F1
#
#
* "Jules Feiffer, a satin
cal sharp-shooter Wit
# a deadly aim, glare
* Balefully at the mean
*ingless violence i
American life, an(
# opens fire on it i
* LITTLE MURDERS."
-New York Pos
#
* "Jules Feiffer has writ
* ten a satire tha
# scorches neatly every
* thing it touches.I
*blisters the hell out o
* sex, marriage, religion
# psychiatry, Ia w, an
* last but far from leas
* a troubled America
j family struggling frt
* survival in the work
# wild with violence."
* -Boston Glob
LITI
*
* ALAN ARKIN in his
* The film is a parody
* creep callers, chokin
* for the evil in the wo
* TUES. & WED.
* SEPT. 25t
* THURS.: See Marily
* SOMETIMES A GREA
'*riyrakynkttkiiy

ILM COOP
-presents-

ir-
tb
.s
n-
in
nd
at
.Y-
It
of
in,
nd
t,
be

JULES FEIFFEI'S
ELLIOT
GOULD
DONALD
SUTHERLAND
(as the minister)
ALAN
A RKIN
(as the detective)
Lou
JACOBI
(as the judge)
{ "The DR.
s>.STRANGELOVE
of the 70's."
-Nesday

'KF
4c
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-'I
T'K
TT
TyK
T'K
TK
T'K
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5 '*

TLE MURDERS

liP 1)11 lIE IIIlii iiE
Come Alone Tonight
WEDNESDAY
(singles night)
OPEN 'TIL 2:00
A wooing experience in sound and light
341 S. MAIN ANN ARBOR
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT SUNDAYS

directorial debut has brought to the. screen the two act plav written by JulesI
, of the Newquist Family and their willingness to "hang-in" a world of m
g air and hidden assasins. LITTLE MURDERS uses comedy and satire as a c
rld. l

Feiffer.
uggers
atharsi:
$1.25

& 26

Modern Languages Aud. 3

7:30 & 9:30 P.M.

I 'WP '2' *.. Waw W BoS.MhA,..myC A W. C.I..,.pany
NEXT: JESUS CHRIST, SUPERSTAR

n Monroe in the Prince and the Showgirl, and Ken Kesey's
AT NOTION.

1111.L.111. .11111111111t1.1111111111.i.111.i.111111111.i.i..i..L J. Jr Jr

r**************#*********#*******###****####*7tr*X

THE FELLINI FESTIVAL
VARIETY LIGHTS
Fellini's first film deals with the real-
- ity of s h o w business. Though he
shares directing credits with Alberto
Lattuada, Fellini depicts a down-and-
out vaudeville troupe with the humor,
insight, and realism that characterizes
other early works such as Nights of
Cabiria and La Stroda.
SHORT: TWO-A satire of Fellini and
Antonioni
THURS.: Fellini's The White Sheik
CINEMA GUILD Tonight . ARCHITECTURE AUD.
at 7 and 9:05 Adm. $1
UAC-DAYSTAR presents
Stephen StillS With manassas

pioneers
modern

of

"

s

painting

AN UNUSUAL SERIES OF NEW FILMS ON ART

RESERVE YOUR SERIES
SUBSCRIPTION NOW!

Written and narrated by LORD KENNETH CLARK,
originator of the "Civilization" series

SCHEDULE

Two Showings Each Evening: 7 and 9 p.m.

Monday, October 1

Wednesday, October 3

Edouard Monet-Paul Cezanne
Monday, October 8 Wednesday, October 10
Claude Monet-George Seurat
Monday, October 15 Wednesday, October 17
Henri Rousseau-Edvard Munch
ALL SHOWINGS IN THE MODERN LANGUAGES BUILDING,
across from the Rackham Building and Washington Street, on the
+t -- ...I l r r - l/ +, I Y1/f r ifs/ ^T h i-k ,nn

Series Subscription quarantees a seat at each of the
three programs. Two hours of film at each program.
Series Subscriptions: Adults, $6; Students, $5;
Only series tickets will be sold in advance
Purchase Tickets by mail with the c o u p a n below or during
selected hours at: the Museum of Art, 525 S. State Street (763-
1231) or The Ann Arbor Art Association, 2275 Platt Road (763-
0590).
1 l
SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS
PIONEERS OF MODERN PAINTING
E NAME___
ADDRESS
' CITY 7-ZIP_
t I
i Enclosed is a check, payable to the University of Michigan in the I
s #
S amount of $ for:
F- Monday, 7:00 p.m., Series Ticket(s) 1 Wednesday, 7 p.m., j

j.
t
t
F
t
f
1
A

0

,: .

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