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September 25, 1973 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-25

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Tuesday, September 25, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, September 25, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pa~e Seven

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Consumer
customer's

Action Cent
rights with

ter fight
county

s for
help

The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program
announces
3 Distinguished Repertory Companies

THE NEW I

COMAN

prese itiing Feydeatu's "voiderfully funny farce"
directeC by Stephen Porter
October 25-27
and Drrenmatts "«ry'com(d
THE YjVISIT
directe bc 1warold Prince.
October27- 28

By JANIS SETTLE
It all started in the fall of
1971 with an idea in the heads of
five University undergrads. And
now, two years and several thou-
sand dollars later, Washtenaw
County has a full-time, govern-
ment-sponsored consumer com-
plaint office.
The office, known as the Con-
sumer Action Center (CAC)',
operates out of the Washtenaw
County Bldg. on Main and Huron
as a division of the county prose-
cutor's office.
IN ADDITION to straightening
out hassles between consu mers
and business people, the center
handles inquiries concerning the
legitimacy and reliability of mer-
chants, mail order services,
prize vacation schemes and other
businesses.
If necessary, the center can
take a wayward merchant to
court. A staff attorney on the
prosecutor's office devotes 20
per cent of his time to handling
the center's cases.
8:30
MON.£& T UES.
U. UTAH
PHILLIPS
the Golden Voice
of the
Great Southwest
2.00
1411 Rill STREET
'tAPgSI

Two cases-concerning faulty
construction practices and a local
wholesale meat company - are
currently pending in the courts.
BUT MOST OF the center's
work does not involve court ac-
tion.
''Most complaints are civil (as
opposed to criminal) in nature,"
according to the center's Asso-
ciate Director Kathy Hopkins.
"We try to save the time and
expense of litigation. The con-
sumer wants his money back,
he's not interested in state ac-
tion," she. explained.
Of the some 1200 complaints
they've handled so far, the cen-
ter has had success in nearly two
thirds of the claims.
THE IDEA for the center was
developed in the fall of 1971 by
five University undergrads who
had spent the summer working
for the Consumer Protection
Agency in Washington, D.C,
Feeling that such an agency
was needed in a college town,
they approached the Ann Arbor
Chamber of Commerce with the
idea, volunteered themselves as
personnel and the Ann Arbor Con-

sumer Action Center was born.
Setting up shop in offices do-
nated by the Chamber the CAC
operated its first year on a
meager budget of $5400 raised
through donations by local mer-
chants.
IN JULY of this year, the
Washtenaw County Commission-
ers voted to take the center on
as a full-fledged division of the
prosecutor's office.

Peron secures landslide victory
in dramatic political comeback

In addition to the benefits of
official government status, the
action gave the center a healthy
operating budget of $44,500 in
federal and county funds. The
appropriation is subject to re-
newal in 1974.
In the coming year, center
officials expect to handle some
1500 complaints.
TO HANDLE the flood, the

JuBUENOS AIRES (Reuter) -
Juan Peron begins a third term
as Argentina's president in 18
days, assured of huge popular
support . after Latin America's
most amazing political come-
back.
His landslide victory, won out-
right without a run-off, gathered
61.57 per cent of the popular vote
and followed nearly 18 years
spent in exile. He was deposed

President and Mrs. Robben W. Fleming
cordiallY in ite yon to attend a
student reception
in their borne
:i t Fi f'teen Sonth University
Thursday, September 27, 1973
from four o'clock to six o'clock.

in a military coup in 1955 and
fled tomfiveoutside the country.
HE WILL BE 78 when he takes
office as Argentina's oldest presi-
dent Oct. 12 after running with
his third wife Isabel as, running
mate. She 'was elected vice-
president, thesfirst Latin Ameri-
can woman to hold such office.
Crowds of drum-beating,awhis-
tle-blowing Peronists paraded
through streets early yesterday
chanting "Peron, Peron" while
buses, cars, taxis and open
trucks packed with flag-waving
youths drove along the capital's
main avenues to celebrate the
general's victory.
He was first elected president
in 1945 and took office the follow-
ing year. Then he was re-elected
in 1952 and stayed in power till
his overthrow. But he never
stopped influencing Argentine
politics.
FROM HIS EXILE in Spain,
he succeeded in getting his own
nominee, Dr. Hector Campora,
elected president last May '25,
ending almost seven years of
military rule.
Peron had himself been dis-
qualified from , running for the
presidency by the military junta
which allowed elections to take
place last March sd that it could
abdicate.

center employs a full-time direc-
tor, associate director and in-
vestigator. In addition, volunteers
are recruited from all parts of
the community.
University students who work
for the center can geut credit
under Course Mart course 306,
Consumer Mediation and Investi-
gation, taught by CAC's Director
John Knapp.

Campora resigned after only
seven weeks in office so that
Peron, who returned home last
June after a brief visit last
November-the first for more
than 17 years-could become
president.
The outcome of Sunday's presi-
dential election has enabled him
to do so.
THE PERONIST VIEW is that
Peron was ruled out of the orig-
inal election unconstitutionally by
a de facto government and the
people were really voting for
him when they elected Campora,
who polled just under 50 per cent
of the popular vote.
Peron is expected to adopt a
nationalist-style rule probably
with barbs of anti-Americanism.
He is known to be interested in
attracting European capital to
Argentina. Key sectors of the
economy can be expected to be
placed- in Argentine/ hands but
not necessarily in those of the
state.
PERON'S NEAREST election
rival.was radical leader Ricardo
Balbin who, in his fourth attempt
at the presidency, polled just
under 2.9 million votes (24.56 per
cent of the poll). This compared
with more than 7.2 million votes
for Peron, according to prelim-
inary results.

tlie precmicrcenCigagemen~ut of

S HEI

STIVA

THEATRE OF CANADA
in G. B. Shav's "warm and vitty"
directed by Edward Gilbert.
December 6 - 9
TH NEW YORK CITY
CENTER ACTIEUvwn COMPANY
preseintiuig John Giay's "sog-Iillcd satire"
(directed by Gene Lesser
February 14-16
and Shakcspeare's comedy of "wr sensuality"
directed by John Housemnan
February16 - 17

Buy the
BS 710 or 810.

0

ARE YOU COLOR BLIND?1
r We need you for
color vision experiments
WE PAY!
Call Vision Lab-764-0574
B'NAI BRITH
HILLEL FOUNDATION
on the occasion of the
JEWISH NEW YEAR
wishes to all and for all a year of health, hap-
piness and peace.
HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
ROSH HASHANAH
SEPT. 26 SEPT. 27 SEPT. 28
REFORM 7:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m.
(1429 Hill)
CONSERVATIVE 7:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.
(Mich. Union Ballroom)
(1429 Hill)
ORTHODOX 6:45 p.m. 8:30 a.m. 8:30 a.m.
ROSH HASHANAH EVE DINNER following serv-
ices. Please call 663-4,129 by 1 p.m. Sept. 26 for
reservations.
IF IT'S A
REALLY GOOD

Either way you'll
get the shaft.
The BSR 810 and 710 have their brains in
their shaft. A carefully machined metal rod
holding eight precision-molded cams. When
the cam shaft turns, the cams make things
happen. A lock is released, an arm raises and
swings, a record drops, a platter starts spinning,
the arm is lowered, the arm stops, the arm raises
again, it swings back, another record is dropped
onto the platter, the arm is lowered again,
and so on, for as many hours as you like.
Deluke turntables from other companies do
much the same thing, but they use many
more parts-scads of separate swinging arms,
gears, plates, and springs-in an arrange-
ment that is not nearly as mechanically
elegant, or as quiet or reliable; that produces
considerably more vibration, and is much
more susceptible to mechanical shock than
the BSR sequential cam shaft system.
When you buy a turntable, make sure you

THIS
MUST
BE

C. - r7l._y__i Y.__1 ...______.'___ -.1 41-- 1

mU ~ ~' u

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