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September 06, 1973 - Image 33

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-06

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Thursday, September 6, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, September 6~ I 97~ THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

Center
By JANE ANDERSON chure
International Center staff member to A
The International Center (IC) planni
works like a revolving door pro- The
viding access to the Ann Arbor- forma
.vacci
University community and di- passe
verse foreign countries. suran
SLocatedat 603 E. Madison; the curre
IC facilities foreign student par-
ticipation in non-academic areas TH
of the local community. At the Stude
> rdent
same time, it advises American stude
students on planning personalized The
and productive study, travel, or fairs
work experiences abroad. inars
: These functions converge as with
......... ...t foreign and American students foreig
,. ::,.f discover the realities of cross- to A
icultural exchange durig pro- The
t .. '' :{jects such as the World's Fair, cultur
g educational programs and social escap
events at the IC or the Rive syndr
Gauche. on c
.....'... .;".... In past semesters, Rive Gauche the e
< } rhas been operated by students as trave
"4an international coffeehouse Sta:
':.where students met for foreign curre
language nights, lectures, folk- 0-
:: .'.singing and partying.
THIS YEAR'S World's Fair
"~' ;es.\s'will highlight the fall term with
exhibits, dancing and food from
..} ':..}..¢{.. all over the world. International
,.Y".n. }.F..}+''.: ~arts and crafts will also be on
: 7 .... . ::;..,...,sale.
Staff members at the IC assist
A.....".f"' "«.': foreign students with problems
<::;:>::f>|;|.:: :;':' :f::"}:' in the areas of housing, work
{>} f : : NE« :::f:::: clearances, immigration and na-
r. ... R 2 ::::::«} { }i turalization regulations, legal
S[} < status, health insurance, and cur-
..... ...,....rency exchange.
A large part of the staff's time
%.::*:>}" .'.x' is spent interpreting the work-
. . . . . .. ings of the University bureau-
i .. cracy to foreign students and
f a ' :r helping them cope with the un-
} , 4familiar and complex problems
of attending a huge educational
institution.
The Work/Study/Travel Abroad
Office provides an extensive li-
Doily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK brary of guidebooks and bro-
ofers opportunities
or internationalstudies

aids
s and personal counseling
merican students who are
ing overseas experiences.
office has up-to-date in-
ation on passports, visas,
nation requirements, r a i 1
s, charter flights, travel in-
ce, customs regulations, and
ncy exchange.
E IC SELLS International
nt Identity Cards and stu-
and youth hostel cards for
nt convenience.
office also sponsors, travel
and travel orientation sem-
to put first-timers in touch
experienced travelers and
gn students who've adjusted
merican university life.
goal is to share cross-
ral experiences, hints about
iing the American tourist
ome and inside information
utting costs and increasing
fficiency and enjoyment of
ling abroad.
ff members of the IC are .
ntly setting up a campus

foreign
travel information network. It
will enable prospective travelers
to talk on a one-to-one basis with
experienced travelers or' foreign
nationals of the countries they
plan to visit.
Official foreign visitors to the
University receive aid from the
IC in planning their itineraries
and developing programs during
their visit to Ann Arbor. The IC
also initiates and participates in
educational programs about is-
sues of international concern.,,
THE IC'S VARIED and detail-
ed resource materials and spe-
cialized staff members constitute
a great, way of gaining an inter-
national perspective and adding
international dimensions to your
education.
Whether you attend the special
lectures at the IC, meet a for-
eign friend at a Rive Gauche
Party, or browse through the
travel library, you're likely to
learn something about cultural
differences and yourself as an
American student.

students

Uoily Photo by DAVID MAKROULIIK

11

11

i

I

By JANE ANDERSON
International Center staff member
The most direct route to a
colorful international career is
an international education.
Options for an international
education at the University in-
clude majoring in an area studies
program, developing an Indi-
vidualized Concentration program
with international dimensions, or
taking courses with international
focuses in the Bachelor of Gen-
eral. Studies (BGS) degree pro-
gram.
As an undergraduate, you can
major in area concentration pro-
grams in East Asian studies,
Near East and North African
studies, or Russian and East
European, studies. You can also
elect the interdepartmental con-
centratiQn in Afro-American and
African studies.
If you're interested in Latin
American studies or. South and
Southeast Asian studies, you can
create an Individualized Concen-
tration in these areas.
TO EXPLORE international as-
pects of various issues such as
economic development, revolu-
tionaly thought or urban plan-
ning, you can use the Individual-
ized Concentration program to
set up a major in these areas.
But such a major involves a
lot of planning find research
early in your academic career.
You'll need to check out the

course offerings of various de-
partments related to your field,
write a four-semester course
plan and a statement of purpose
about your concentration.
An Individualized Concentra-
tion also requires completion of
the foreign language and LSA
distribution requirements.
The International Center on'
campus has a listing of courses
relevant to international studies.
Staff members can advise you
about ways to set up an Individ-
ualized Concentration in Inter-
national Studies. They'll put you
in touch with faculty members in
various departments who would
be interested in your academic
programs and development.
THE POSSIBILITIES for an In-
dividualized Concentration pro-
gram are as varied as individual
student interests and goals. A
hypothetical International Studies
program for two semesters in
Revolutionary Thought and Ac-
tion might look like this:
winter semester, junior year
Afro-American and African Studies
89.5 4

540: Comparative Decolonization
Political Science 601: Anarchism
Sociology 450: Political Sociology
History 603: Comparative Studies of
Revolutionary Elites
fall semester, senior year
History 587: Latin America and the
Third World
Psychology 487: Psychology, of In
fluence
Political Science 484: Politics of
Disaffection
Political Science 407: Communist
Political Thought
This selection is geared to an
interest in the Third World. An-
other selection might be weight-
ed toward a comparative study
of the Soviet and Chinese revolu-
tions.
Many of the courses listed
above have prerequisites or can
be taken only with the permission
of the- instructor. Most prerequi-
sites can be met while fulfilling
LSA distribution requirements.
Again, if you're developing an
Individualized ^ Concentration in
International Studies, careful
planning and knowledge of the
faculty and courses in many de-
partments are necessary.

A final way to get an interna-
tional education is through the
BGS program, which doesn't re-
quire LSA distribution and for-
eign language courses. However,
a concentration in International
Studies in the framework of a
BGS is not recognized on tran-
scripts or diplomas.
HAIRCUTS that
don't look like
HAIRCUTS
DASCOLA BARBERS
611 E. University
615 E. Liberty

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We try pretty hard to
make it easy for students to get
through to people..
For example, we've set up
a special system so that you
can order your phones before
you arrive for the fall term.
You simply call us collect.
Dial (Area Code 313)
761-9900, and tell us where
you'll be living and when you'll
arrive. And we'll have your
phone. connected on time.
If you're in town, you may
visit our business office at 324
East Huron, anytime between
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.,On Saturday,
September 8th only, we'll be
open from.8 a.m. to 5 p.m. by
telephone:
But don't forget. Order
your phone service early and
you won't have a wait problem.

L

6b

F,

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