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September 23, 1973 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-23

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I

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 23, 1973

looking back:

the

week as it was.

Szuba in Chile
When Michigan swimrper Tom
Szuba embarked on a two week
government-sponsored swim tour
in South America, he had no idea
that the package deal would in-
clude ringside seats to the blood.
shed and destruction which reign-
ed during the recent military
coup of the communist regime in
Chile.
Szuba, along with seven other
AAU swimmers, arrived in the
Chilean capital of Santiago four
days before a military junta top-
pled the government of Marxist
President Salavadore Allende.
But there was a catch. It
,seems that our friends in the
State Department had been in-
formed of the plans . 48 hours
prior to the revolt. No effort was
made to remove the eight AAU
swimmers from the capital.
* This combination of events not
only led to a slightly red-in-the-
face State Department, but also
to a moderately enraged Szuba
- who .was forced to crawl on

The highly contested resolution
submitted by Regenf G e r, a 1 d
Dunn (R-Ann Arbor) was prompt-
ed by an August statement by
State Attorney General Frank
Kelley.
Kelley declared that salaries of
all public employes of tax sup-
ported state universities are of
public record.
Despite pressure from the Daily
and Student Government Council,
the University stalled action on
the proposal claiming that such
information was nobody's busi-
ness.
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann
Arbor specifically stated that
such information would entail an
"invasion of one's privacy."
Although visibly disturbed by
the dscision, Daily Editor Chris-
topher Parks had just begun to
fight. "The Daily will still pursue
the issue . . . they're not off the
hook yet," he said.
* * *
Sly at Hill
Sylvester "Sly" Stewart a n d
His Family Stone slid into town
Friday night at the tail of a
marathon 11 hour dispute be-
tween University officials a n d
local sponsors.
Promoter Ron Palmeree a n d
other representatives of the
Black Pre law students Associa-
tion signed an agreement with
the University, thus quashing all
rumors that the show wouldn't
come off. BPL hod on several oc-
casions failed to produce the
$1,000 required payment for use
of Hill Auditorium.
As a result of the confusion,
ticket sales for the concert had
been dragging. Two days before
the concert only 500 seats had
been sold.,
By the night of the show Hill
Auditorium was nearly sold out.
A stoned, patient crowd waited a
half hour between sets to hear
the group perform. Then Slyhand
his dandily dressed group stomp-
ed on stage.
Fifty-nine minutes later, and
after a relatively disappointing
set he stomped, off with most of
the crowd and the thousand dol-
lars neatly stuffed, in his psang-
led pocket.
* * *
King crowns Riggs
This item violates- a policy
we have not to review non-local,
news,but we just can't resist:
Thompson's Pizza employees
took their phones off the hook
Thursday night. They, like most
everyone in Ann Arbor and the
rest of the continental United
States, didn't want to be bother-
ed while they watched the mod-
ern-day Joan of Arc of tennis,
Billie Jean King, trample the wiz-
ened Male Chauvinist Pig and
supreme hustler himself, Bobby

Riggs.
It was a scene, all in all,
which could only have come out
of a mind madly torn between
the worlds of Salvador Dali and
P.T. Barnum.
Riggs was completely demol-

Puscas, undoubtedly one of the
most offensive and least imag-
inative sportswriters around,
walked off with his foot squarely
in his mouth. For over a week,
Puscas belittled Billie Jean and
sang Riggs' praises. In retalia-
tion, an almost equally offen-
sive Free Press reporter, Nancy
Woodhull, took up Billie Jean's
case. She ended, however, by
filing stories about the difficul-
ty of the King marriage (imag-
ine writing the same story about
the difficulty of a male tennis
star's marriage) and about how
Bobby wasn't that bad after all.
What all of it proves, finally,
is very little. It proves that a
classy, sassy King could ouf-
hustle an anemic Riggs. The
Women's movement didn't ad-
vance much in the process. For
insecure men, the possible ex-
cuses abound - age, the court
surface, Riggs' lack of training.
It was a killing for both play-
ers, and an enjoyable interlude
for a public weary of scandal
and revolution.
* * *
Hike and Strike.
The tuition strike continued to
move forward last week, but no
one seemed to be sure where it
was headed. Strike organizers
held meetings and rallies with
the intention of gathering sup-
port, but with a week remaining
before the Sept. 28 deadline for
the first tuition payment, no one
could be sure whether enough
students would withhold money
to make the effort effective.
The target of the strike - the
24 per cent tuition increase -
was the topic.of many questions

and very few answers. For ex-
ample: if the University needs
$2.5 million to cover losses due
to the Supreme Court ruling on
in-state tuition, plus some money
to cover inflation and increased

are so hazy and impregnable that
very few out-of-state students
will qualify, isn't that $2.5 million
loss figure a littlehigh? Won't
there be millions of dollars to
spare? No comment, chorused
University officials last week.
But as the week ended, an ad-
ministration source hinted that
a tuition rollback might be con-
sidered if substantially fewer
students qualify for residency
than was originallyranticipated.
Solid information was nowhere to
be found: for both strike organiz-
ers seeking support and Univer-
sity officials wondering about
cash intake, the waiting game
will probably go on for another
week.

Is
Hassidic Prayer and Study
at BAIS CHABAD STUDENT
CENTER and SYNAGOGUE
28555 MIDDLEBELT ROAD, FARMINGTON
just north of 12 Mile Rd. outside Detroit. 40 min, from Ann
Arbor
ROSH HASHANA-starts bed. evening Sept. 26,
6:45; Thurs. and Fri., Sept. 27-28.
YOM, KIPPUR-starts Oct. 5, 6:35. Sat., Oct. 6..
Transportation available. Weekly programs. Festive
holiday meals. No charges.
CALL 548-2666, 542-5058

6

Smith

The
Loving Cup

King
ished, consummately humbled-
while Billie Jean, with dignified
dispatch, gave an estimated 50
million television viewers and
30,000 spectators at the Astr-
dome a lesson in near-perfect
tennis.
At least one upshot of t h e
match were the often-ludicrous
rivalries which sprung up , be-
tween the sexes over its out-
come. Locally, the prize goes to
the Detroit Free Press.
Executive Sports Editor George

SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE

Szuba
his stomach in order to dodge
bullets.
"It's lucky we weren't hurt,"
Szuba stated calmly on his ar-
rival at Detroit Metro Airport
Thursday.
A spokesperson for the S t a t e
Department's Cultural Affairs
.Office took no responsibility for
the mistake, "Not everybody
knew about the coup ahead of
time . . . I for one didn't."
Latest word from Washington
suggest that the buck is still in
the process of being passed.
,4 * *
Salaries private
With a vote of 6-2 the Regents
defeated once and for all a mo-
tion directing the University to
disclose salaries of individual em-
ployes.

Everyone
LOTS OF PEOPLE

Welcome!
GRAD
COFFEE,
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
LOTS OF FOOD

financial aid, the record fee hike
will bring in much more money
than is needed, right? Wrong,
said Vice President for Academ-
ic Affairs Allan Smith on a
WCBN radio show'Monday night.
And if the new residency rules
HARRY "S
SURPLUS
1166 Broadway
(north of Broadway bridge)
769-9247
FIELD
JACKETS . $10.98 UP
FIELD JACKET
LINERS .......4.50 UP
FIELD
OVERCOAT .......7.98
LEATHER FLIGHT
JACKETS .......67.98
AIR FORCE SNORKEL
PARKAS ......;.49.98
DOWN INSULATED
PARKAS .... 37.98 UP .
INSULATED
SWEATSHIRTS ... 6.98
Another location at 2050 N.
Telegraph Rd. at Ford Rd.,
Dearborn-ph. 565-6605

Ann Arbor Civic Ballet
WILL HOLD'
AUDITIONS
Male and Female Dancers
needed for
Major and Junior corps
{, WED., SEPT. 26
7:00 p.m.
at Sylvia Studio
tel .668-8066
for further information
CONCERT DATES-3-i4 SEASON
OCT. 13-Joint Concert with A.A. Symphony
Orchestra
DEC. 2-Christmas Concert at Power Center
MAR. 15-Spring Concert at Power Center

UAC-DAYSTAR Presents:
RO"BERTA -FLACK
in concert
Saturday, October 27
hil] auditorium
reserved seats $6, $5, $4
go on sile MONDAY only at MICHIGAN UNION
11-5:30 p.m. info 763-4553
sorry, no personal checks
also, on sale now at union:
stephen stills mantssas
one week from tonight, sept. 28
crisler arena, $4 advance, $5 door
also in advance at
Discount Records, S.U., and World Hdqtrs. Records

"-"

Seniors

&

Grad,

Students

EMPLOYMENT AFTER GRADUATION?
GRAD SCHOOL?

OR.

. whati?

.;.:.;<.:. ~Anr
i O .
a
+
t b. M e]

n Arbor Civic Theatre's
ARMS
kND THE
M AN
mantic comedy by

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Come find out how the services of
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT*
can help you get where you want to go.
Come to a
REGISTRATION MEETING

vI

Tues., Sept. 25

Wed., Sept. 26

.B. SHA

w
73
atre

Meetings will be held every hour on the hour
beginning 10 a.m. Last meeting starts 5:00 p.m.
UGLI Multipurpose Room
FIND OUT ABOUT:
-on-campus interviews with employers and

CAREER

ctober 3-6, 19
ndelssohin The

1: grad/law schools

I

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