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September 20, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-20

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Thursday, September 20, 1973

I HE MIt,.NIbAN URILY

wage 1Ihree

Thursday, September 20, 1973 il-IL MILt-1l(~AN UAILY

Hussein
releases
guerilas
Amnesty seen as
deal for ending
Jordon, isolation
BEIRUT (Reuter) - Jordan
yesterday released the bulk of its
political prisoners - mostly Pales-
tinian commandos - under a
sweeping amnesty which has been
generally welcomed in the Arab
world.
Despite a cool reception from the
Palestine resistance movement it-
self - which declared it would not
be deceived by King Hussein's ges-
ture - the amnesty has been seen
by Arab commentators as an im-
portant step in a new campaign
to rebuild Arab unity.
The king himself personally
supervised the release Tuesday)
night of the first prisoners, includ-
ing Mohammed Daud Odeh ("Abu
Daud"), the controversial Fatah .
leader.
The remainder of the detainees
-754 in all, according to official
Jordanian sources - were being
freed yesterday from the seven
scattered prisons where they have
been held.
Most of them have been in de-
tention since the Jordanian army
closed down the guerrillas bases in
heavy fighting during 1970 and
1971.
Relatives milled around and
danced outside Mahatta Central
Prison in Amman to see the first
of them freed.
Early yesterday morning, con-
voys began bringing out other de-I
tainees from the desert prison
camp of Al-Jafr.
Two ,other Fedayeen leaders
were among the first released: Sa-
leh Raafat of the popular Demo-
cratic Front for the Liberation of
Palestine (PDFLP) and HamdiI
Matar of the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine (PFLP).
There was no immediate official
Arab comment on the amnesty, but
newspaper editorialists agreed that
the motive for King Hussein's de-
cision lay in the talks he had in
Cairo last week with the presi-
dents of Egypt and Syria, rather
than in any new spirit of friend-
ship for the Fedayeen.
Commentators said the amnesty
was clearly part of a deal to bring
Jordan back into the Arab camp
after a period of isolation in pro-
test against Amman's treatment of
the commandos.
Most of them saw the amnesty
as the king's major concession in
the deal, in exchange. for the re-
sumption of diplomatic relations
by Egypt, announced last week,
and with Syria, expected shortly.
Some reports said the king must
have received assurances from
Egypt and Syria that they would
restrain the commandos from con-
tinuing to attack Jordan. They
noted that the Syrians have al-
ready closed down an anti-Jordan
guerrilla radio station.
The only reaction so far by the
commandos has been the comment
Tuesday night by the Palestine
news agency: "We will not be de-
ceived ... once again we say that
the system of oppression in Am-
man will not be changed."
Daily Official Bulletin
Thursday, September 20

DAY CALENDAR
Engineering Dept.: Slide lecture on
improving efficiency in the library,
Transportation Lib., 3rd fl., UGLI, 10
am.
Mental Health Res. Inst.: J. Diamond,
McMaster Univ., "The Control of Nerve
Territory By AXoplasmic Fastors," MH-
RI Rm., 1057, 3:45 pm.
Grad. Sch. of Business Administra-
tion: J. Duesenberry, "Can We Control
Inflation?" Hale Aud., 4 p.m.
Nuclear Seminar: H. Griffin, "Report
on the 3rd Internat'i Symposium on the
Physics & Chemistry of Fission," P-A
Colloquium Rm., 4 pm.
Speech - Communication Dept.: R.
Forston, "Intercultural Nonverbal Com-
mnunication: Latin American, Black, &
White American," Rackham, W. Conf.
Rmi,. 7 pm."
Michigan Women in Science: Work-
shop on career & family, Rackham As-
sembly Hall, 4th fl., 8 pm.
Chemistry Lecture: A. Bader, Al-
drich Chem. Co., "The Chemistry of
Art," 1210 Chem. Bldg., 8 pm.
GENERAL NOTICES
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Sept. 21,
5:00 p.m. is the last date for the Fall
Term' when the Registrar's Office will:
a. Accept the Student 100 per cent
Withdrawal Notice for refund pur-
poses. (Excluding a $50.00 disenrollment
fee.)
b. Allow refund for the student who
reduces hours of course credit.
Oct. 19, 5:00 p.m. is last date for the
Fall Term when Registrar's Office will
allow refund for a 50 per cent With-
drawal.

Nixon wage
veto upheld
by House
WASHINGTON (YP) - The House
has upheld Nixon's veto of a bill
increasing the minimum wage to
$2.20 an hour and extending cov-
erage to 7 million new workers, in-
cluding household maids.
The 259-164 vote yesterday was
23 votes short of the two-thirds ma-
jority needed to override its veto.
It gave Nixon a perfect six-for-six
batting average in vetoes sustained
this year.
The White House issued a state-
ment saying President Nixon was
gratified by the House action.
The statement continued: "It is
now up the Congress to replace the
vetoed bill this year with a new
bill which will bring the minimum
wage in line with the increased
cost of living while doing so in a
way that helps to check inflation
and that protects jobs for low-in-
come workers."
Nixon vetoed the bill on grounds
it would increase unemployment
and add to inflationary pressures.
The bill would have hiked the
minimum wage from $1.60 an hour
to $2 this year and $2.20 next year.
Nixon's reasons were called "a
mockery" by Majority Leader
Thomas O'Neill Jr. (D-Mass.) who
said workers at the $2.20 level
would barely be able to sustain
life.
Rep.tCarl Perkins (D-Ky.) said
more than half the states provide
welfare payments higher than the
proposed minimum wage.
A determined lobbying effort by
organized labor was unable to cut
deeply enough into the conserva-
tive opposition to produce a two-
thirds majority.
Fifty - one Republicans sided
against the administration and vo-
ted to override. But 29 Democrats
offset the loss, joining with 135 Re-'
publicans to give Nixon a com-
fortablemargin.
M The vote, which wiped out a
three-year effort in Congress to in-
crease the minimum wage, last
raised in 1966, left the future of the
legislation in doubt.
Nixon and most Republicans who
took part on the debate said they!
would support a more moderate
bill and urged the Democrats on
the Education and Labor Commit-
tee to bring one out promptly.

Microscopes...
STUDENT, MEDICAL
& PROFESSIONAL
Lowest Discount Prices
University Optics, Inc.
761]-0430

J o rsc I 1,4 &',lvct*J
l _ dtx oi (I1i

AP Photo
CARL GUSTAF officially becomes King of Sweden as Minister of Justice Lennart Geljer administers
the oath yesterday. King Gustaf, 27, succeeds his grandfather King Gustaf VI Adolf, who died Saturday.
Sweden hals new king;
natinalarties clash

AN EVENING OF MIME

c

STOCKHOLM (Reuter) - King political crisis for years, after the
Carl XVI Gustaf, the World's ruling socialist and opposition par-
youngest monarch took the throne ties dead-heated in parliament in

of Sweden yesterday as the Social
Democrats, the party which has
ruled the nation for 41 years, faced
a probable deadlock in parliament
after Sunday's general election.
The nation took time off from
vote counting to watch as the 27-
year-old king, a stocky, boyish fi-
gure in his admiral's uniform and
ermine robe, briefly took the
throne in the palace's marble hall.
Like his grandfather King Gus-
tav Adolf, who died Saturday aged
90, the King dispensed with a for-,
mal coronation. He told Sweden's
eight million people that his reign
would reflect the needs of his na-
tion's contemporary society.
The King came to the throne with
his country locked in its biggest

the elections.
For many in Sweden, the younig;
king's accession ceremony was a
symbol of unity in the midst ofl
change and a welcome relief fromi
party politics.
As the last votes were beingf
counted yesterday officials said a
deadlock of 175 seats each for theI
socialist and opposition blocs was
now virtually certain.
But political experts predicted
that if the deadheat were confirm-
ed the opposition would demand+
the government's resignation when+

its present term of office expires
at the end of the year.
The Social Democrats lost seven
seats in Sunday's poll and their
support from the Swedish elector-
ate has now fallen from over 50
per cent in 1968 to 33.7 per cent.
Prime Minister Olaf Palme is
hoping to stay in power with the
help of the Communists, whose 19
seats put the depleted Social Dem-
ocrat group on level terms with
the combined Center, Conserva-
tive and Liberal parties.
The 46-year-old prime minister
has so far rejected anysuggestion
of quitting and agreeing to new
elections in the spring.

For further information call 764-0450 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
Tickets available Mendelssohn Tht. Box Office & Fishbowl
"---------------mm m m -m ---------m i--- "r r i--------- i----m ir--- m-----
MAIL ORDER FORM
AN EVENING OF MIME with C. W. METCALF

(Please Print)
NAME
ADDRESS_

No. tickets
Price ea.
TOTAL
Total amount
enclosed

Lm

a

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 13
Thursday, September 20, 1973
is editedand managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone1
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
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Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
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through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

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