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September 16, 1973 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-16

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Sunday, September -16, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Sunday, September 16, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page rive

Putting it all t(
A reshman's t
By ROY PULVERS bored. I suppose that such an in-
Tearlessly, I said goodbye to tense period of chaos and those
my parents but my dry eyes couple of shaky days of self-
were no indication of my emo- analysis and emotional fence-
tions when my voice broke straddling had to be followed by
through and told them I guessed a couple of days which can only
that I'd see them soon. I walked be called boring. My mind just
slowly back to my dorm room wasn't quite geared to think
with too many thoughts whirling about the real world or anything
in my mind and $400 in cashier's else, for that matter.
checks in hand. For all of Thursday, Friday,
I arrived on Monday and and most of Saturday, not only
stayed in my dorm room wait- was I bored to death but I began
ing for things to happen to me to have my doubts about the abil-
but it soon became clear that ity of my mind to function in an
the slip of paper with my name 'academic environment after
on the door was not an instant what seemed to be a decade.

oget her:
houghts
And eventually people's smiles
began to'seem more real and I
was pretty sure that I had
weathered the storm.
I met my roommate a few day s
after I arrived; we're both on
the quiet side and ought to get
along pretty well. There was a
helluva lot of nervous energy ex-
pended worrying about what may
roommate would be like. Now
that too is one less thing to wor-
ry about.
There is not time to worry
about too much now because
there are pizzas, religious groups,
refrigerators, bicycles, newspa-

"I had spent my first week at the U1nitversity feeling my way around
campus . . . I was scared but there was an undeniable satisfaction in
having broken away. And eventually people's s m i l e s began to seem
more real. I was pretty sure that I hadw eathered the storm."

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Students gather on diag to protest overthrow of Chile's
Allende and the United State's alleged role.
looking hack:
the week as itwa

ticket to excitement.
For two solid days I was the
world's loneliest person. The in-
securities were massive, and it
became very apparent that the
only cure would be time. The
force of sudden and irretract-
able independence was great and
was somehow tied to trying to
understand where the motivation
would come from to propel my-,
self through four years of college.
The question remains unre-
solved and the not-so-massive
anymore uncertainties still exist-
but the passage of time has made
them seem almost inconsequen-
tial. Perhaps it is the changing
concept of time which is the
most notable of all the impres-
sions that bombard an entering
freshperson.
I questioned, I pondered deep
thoughts, and, finally, I was

But then classes begin and
suddenly there is no more time
to try to understand my enor-
mous feelings of displacement
and transition; and there is no
time to be bored. Classes meet
and push ahead without regard
for the screwed-up machinations
of a freshperson's mind. The ini-
tial onslaught of work is prob-
ably-healthy though, and quickly
provides a stable base on which
to function. It is amazing how
quickly academic concerns re-
place internal upheaval.
I had spent my first week gat
the University feeling my way
around campus, trying to shake
some of the guilt that comes
with feeling pretty good about
having left home. I was scared
but there was an undeniable sat-
isfaction in having broken away.

pers, movies, books. Everybody
seems to have an angle, a way
to get into your life for only 10%
down or speedy delivery. You
can even subscribe to every mag-
azine ever printed for half of
what normal people pay because
you are a college student. A stu-
dent in Ann Arbor, city of limit-
less opportunities, where there
are fifty-cent bicycle licenses-
and thousands upon thousands of
people who don't know that Mid-
westerners talk funny.
Roy Pultvers, a freshman from
New York, is a ;nest writer for
The Dail).

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SGC President Lee Gill's plea
for a tuition strike last. week
("We've got to start a move-
ment") gathered support on .a
number of fronts. On Wednesday,
a coalition of math teaching fel-
lows resolved to support the
strike and to organize opposition
to "the capricious way in which
the University treats students
and employes." TFs in the politi-
cal science and Romance lang-
uage departments also proclaim-
ed their support for the strike.
At a forum on the strike where
some 120 jammed into an East
Quad meeting room, Gill an-
nounced that over 2,000 signa-
tures supporting the strike had
already been collected. "Some
people," he said "have begun to
hear rumblings that this strike
might be big."
Administration officials were
shaken by the growing support
for the strike. Allan Smith, vice
president for academic affairs,
said he was "shocked" to hear
Gill ask freshmen to "pocket
your September tuition p a y -
ment" and admitted an effective
tuition strike "would create a
substantial crisis."
And in a sign that the admin-
istration was backing off from
its tight-lipped stance on financ-
ial matters, Smith said he would
reveal highlights of the 1973-74
budget that could help to explain
the massive tuition hike.
But by week's end, Gill and
other strike supporters remained
unappeased. Even if the Univer-
sity can explain the fee increases,
Gill said, the strike is still on.
"I'm not going to let them get
off the hook," he explained.
It seems strangely Kafkaes-
que, this cloak of secrecy which
hangs over the new requirements
or in-state tuition status. You
can apply for in-state status, but
just how you get it, no one's
quite saying. The choice is made
from among a variety of criter-

ia - some as absurd as prov-
ing "intent to make Michigan
one's permanent home" - b u t
which criteria are for whom is
left to the discretion of the regis-
trar's office.
And that's not all. Should your
request be turned down, you
get no explanation. An appeal is
permitted but that leaves t h e
dazed student in precisely Joseph
K's predicament: judged guilty,
but what for? Any appeal can
be no more than a restatement
of the original failed defense.
Ironically this summer's Su-
preme Court ruling on residency
came in response to a group of
students who argued, success-
fully, that it was unconstitutional
to deny they were residents,
simply because they didn't work
in the given city. It backfired on
hundreds of Michigan students
who discovered that -as part of
the ruling, the residency re-
quirements for everyone were
going to be lots more stringent
and subjective. Over at legal aid
in the Union this week, throngs
of irate students sought advice.
They received sympathy but lit-
tle encouragement.
Just to add a note of absurdity
to the bureaucratic tangle, at
least one student is lying low and
feeling fine. Herb, as we'll call
him, applied for in-state status
in January, saying he'd h a v e
been living in Ann Arbor six
months as of July 1. Because he
had.no job, he promised, as stip-
ulated in the old rules, to pro-
duce two notarized signatures at-
testing to his residency.
Instead, he left town in early
May, never provided any proof of
residency, and came back the
last day of registration to find
he'd been awarded in-state stat-
us.
Some guys get all the breaks.
Stay tuned for more.
0 0 0
In a revival of Ann Arbor ac-

tivism (circa '68), some 50 stu-
dents occupied the local office of
U.S. Rep. Marvin Esch Friday
afternoon to protest the over-
throw of the Allende regime in
Chile. They stayed until Esch
released a statement on the
coup.
"It's too premature to make
any decision now," Esch s a i d.
"The ultimate decision restswith
the Administration.",
After receiving that reassur-
ing statement from their Con-
gressman, the demonstrators
withdrew.
'U' Housing Director J o. h n
Feldkamp addressed a group of
50 freshmen Wednesday to ex-
plain why there are more people
than beds in the dormitories.
The fifty homeless students have
been housed as third persons in
double rooms in some cases;
others have had to put up with
makeshift accommodations rang-
ing from storage rooms to linen
closets.
Feldkamp blamed the housing
shortage on increased e n r o l 1-
ment and assured the students
that the University "will not
leave anyone stranded."
Yesterday was eviction day for
the temporarily housed students
and with the aid of a University
subsidy they moved to the place
they will now call home - the
Bell Tower Hotel.
Bicyclists are learning about
Ann Arbor's strange one-way
streets the hard way. With the
university getting tough on tui-
tion and residency requirements,
and with the city cracking down
on dope-smokers, police h a v e
followed suit with bikers - for
both illegal parking and for rid-
ing the wrong way on one-way
streets. Add that one to your list
of paranoias.

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CORRECTION

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The Michigan Daily

regrets

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the error contained in

A Moving Experience in Sound and Light

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Tuesday's ad for

PRIMO

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vnWe

SHOWBAR. It should have
read:
MON DAY-Sept. 17

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