100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1973 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-15
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. . . -.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 15, 1973

Saturday, September 15, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pnchiess -Badg ers-
seekrespectabilit

Stanford readies
for Rose rematch

By DAN BORUS
"NOTHING in the world
can take the place of Persis-
tence. Talent will not; nothing
is more comn inn then unsuccess-
ful men with talent. Genius will
not; inrewarded genius is almost
a pro vrb. Education will not;
the world is full of ec/ucated
derelicts. Persistence and deter-
mination alone are oinnipotent.
The slogan "Press On" has solv-
ed and always will solve the
problems of the human race --
Calvin Coolidge, Quoted in the
Wisconsin football press book
With a flourish -and a quote
from one of America's least talk-
ative Presidents, Wisconsin has
served notice to the rest of the
league that Wisconsin is heading
for a losing season again.
The graduation of Rufus
"Roadrunner Ferguson, t h e
shiftiest of the Madison backs
and Rudy Steiner, last year's
starting quarterback, means sad
tidings for Bucky Badger, a mas-
cot who has seen ten straight
losing seasons.
To make .matters worse, the
Badger squad which was 4 and 7
last year, has a brutal schedule,
drawing Colorado, Nebraska,
Ohio State and Michigan in a five
week period.
Badger mentor John Jardine
who barely escaped a student-
led purge is exuding confidence,
but his statements can not be
construed as optimistic.
All is not pitch black for the
Badgers. In fact with a lot of

Calvin Coolidge persistence re-
spectability may not -be too far
away.
The line offensively speaking is'
solid, but not imposing. And in
Mike Webster the Badgers have
a superlative center. A man who
can hold his blocks like Dean
WISCONSIN (4-7-0, 2-6-0)
Michigan Opponent No. 6
Starters back-Offense 8
Defense 6
Series: Michigan, 24-7-1
Martin holds his liquor will be
a unwelcome sight to Badger op-.
ponents. A senior, Webster has
drilled through two years of pit
fighting.
At wide receiver, the Badgers
have a truly excellent man in
Tom Mack who-led the team in
reception and has been known to
practice that most surprising of
plays, the end around.
Quarterbacking duties will be
handled by Greg Bohling, a 5-11
junior who played behind Steiner
last year. Bohling has the firm
endorsement of Jardine.
Since last year's offense was
called "Road - Runner right,
Road' Runner left," no return-
ing Badger has great Big Ten
rushing stats. But that doesn't
necessarily mean no runner is
capable of lugging" the pig-
skin. Senior Chuck Richardson
will play fullback and is the lead-
ing returning rusher on the
squad.'
Positions in the offensive back-
field are still hanging in the bal-
ance and will be determined by
the fall scrimmages.

Now to the defense:
With the exception of Wide
Safety Terry Buss, the defenders
at Wisconsin are all vets of Big
Ten action-and eight are return-
ing starters. That sounds nice
and will certainly help the Bad-
gers, but it should be noted that-
as a unit the Badgers yielded an
average of 21 points and 352
yards a game.
Madison is not the rah-rah
place it once was and though the
Badgers will improve over last
year's performance, it is doubt-
ful that old style persistence can
make the 70 odd thousand who
show up at Camp Randall Sta-
dium pleased with the show.

S-15
22
29
0-6
13
20
27
N- 3
10
17
24

Badger ledger
Purdue
Colorado
at Nebraska
Wyoming
at Ohio State
AT MICHIGAN
Indiana
at Michigan State
Iowa
Northwestern
at Minnesota

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
MICHIGAN'S Clint Haslerig (43) rounds the corner against the
impotent 1972 Gophers at last season's homecoming 42-0 win. The
Minnesota defense is still on the porous side.

Gophers' power runner King
sparks hopes for better year

(Continued from Page 4)
has all the credentials for an
All-America prospect, but the
rest of the rush line looks like a
dollar bill, green and deflated.
OPTIMISM runs high that the
linebacking trio will not falter
despite the loss of the team's
leading tackler Jim Merlo to
graduation. The Cardinals have
a lot of bodies to fill this area
with the semi - reasonable as-
sumption that someone is bound
to come through.
James Ferguson and Randy
Polti spearhead a secondary
that led the Pac-8 in pass de-
fense last season, although that
statistic must be tempered with
a reminder that most teams took
advantage of the Cardinals' weak
rushing defense and disdained
the pass. If the rush proves less
successful in '73, Cardinal oppo-
nents may have to pass more,
and should they do so Christian-
sen's veteran secondary could
get a superb chance to prove its
mettle.
ROD GARCIA already holds
the Stanford career record for.
field goals with 24 in 51 attempts
with his biggest claim to fame
his last minute game winning
three-pointer in the previously
mentioned you know what. A
strong legged placement special-
ist such as Garcia can be a vital
weapon in college football where,
unlike the pros, not everyone is
so blessed.
Offense:
Green
linemen
(Continued from Page 7)
where Chuck Heater and Gil
Chapman line up. Heater (6-0,
200) was Michigan's second lead-
ling rusher last season with 655
yards, and caught three passes
for 31 yards. Chapman was
moved from split end back to
tailback to better utilize his run-
ning speed.
Clint Haslerig is a two year
letterman at the wingback spot,
and is backed up there by an-
other two year letterman, Larry
Gustafson.
Michigan's offense is, in a
word, powerful. Potentially ex-
plosive, but lacking in experi-
ence in certain areas, it still
should provide plenty of excite-
ment for Wolverine fans. As the
season progresses toward that
possibly title deciding finale,
watch for those cries of "pass"
to be somewhat satisfied, and
the Big Blue Machine to rise to
some soaring heights.
Stolz to

The overall outlook for Stan-
ford should be bright, although
it must be veiled in guarded op-
timism. The Cardinals should be
able .to score points, but ball
control could be a - problem un-
less some kind of viable ground
game materializes.
Boryla and Winesberry will at-
tract a lot of attention from per-
petually present post season- po-
tency predicators, as should
Garcia.
However, if the offensive line
falters this trio's statistics could
be below predicted levels. Ditto
Stanford's-point production.
On the other side of the coin,
Stanford will have to find a
means of curtailing enemy
ground attacks and force them
to the airways where Stanford's
best defensive weapons will come
into prominence. Failure here
spells instant death against such
prolific overland powers as
Michigan, UCLA, and. USC.
The Cardinals chances of a
loftier finish than third in the
Pac-8 standings hinge entirely on
the development of sound offen-
sive and defensive lines. Boryla
and company will put points on
the board, but the Cardinals abil-
ity to keep opponents off will
decide whether Stanford will be
a top twenty team or just an-
other .500 ballclub.

Dail
BILLY TAYLOR (42) won't be on the field when Stanford invades Mich
for the rematch of the 1972 Rose Bowl, but some of his teammates are sti

b~ 14

1 Q
)a
Trim cut to fit the
trim man.
Lee Cuffed Tack Flare
Slacks.
Latest nostalgia styling.
Wide flare
With
two-inch cuffs.
fabric &colors
$12.00
MEN'S FASHION CLOTHING
ANN ARBOR EAST LANSING
American Express, BankAmericard, Master Charge

C
c
t
t
t
t

By DAN BORUS
The longest current winning
streak in the Big Ten is three and
is residing quite happily in Min-
neapolis where the Golden Gophers
of Minnesota hold forth.
But the Gophers ability to hold
the proudly possessed streak will
be tested on Opening Day when
they march into Columbus. Sopho-
more Coach Cal Stoll will find out
exactly what stuff this year's
Gophers are made.
From all indications the Gophers
could easily nudge their way into
Big Ten. prominence because the
alent and experience is present.
And Stoll's recruiting expeditions
nto Michigan's schoolboy ranks
yielded eight new Gophers.
Offensively, the Gophers have
mastered the Veer-T offense Stoll
nstituted last year. And they have
he horses to run the pigskin and
he horse to clear the way.

The brightest star in the Min-
nesota constellation of running
backs is Fullback John King (6-1,
205). A workman who can go both
MINNESOTA (4-7-0, 4-4-0)
Michigan Opponent No. 7
Starters back-Offense 6
Defense 6
Series: Michigan, 39-21-3
inside and out, King eclipsed vir-
tually every rushing and scoring
record in Gopher annals.
The first Gopher to run for more
than 1000 yards in a single season,
King tallied 12 touchdowns in last
year's rise from rushing oblivion.
Joining King in the backfield, and
the man who will provide the out-
side speed to match-King's power,
is Rick "Black Magic" Upchurch,
a Junior College transfer whose
vital statistics are 6-0, 195.

i

WHAT'S A
STEAK'~4
yI""i"iv :.': :iii'"''i' iiii

Upchurch has gotten a lot of
ink and could be the next Gallop-
ing Gopher, but that remains to be
seen.
The question mark for the Go-
phers is that perenial vital spot,
quarterback. Last year's guiding
hand was provided by Bob Morgan,
but he has departed due to gradua-
tion.
In his stead will be sophomore
letterman John Lawing (6-2, 210).
The press guide labels Lawing "an
intelligent player who has vastly
improved his passing technique,"
but many an intelligent player has
gone down in dispair because he
lacked the field finesse to put his
The defense, however, is, to put
it kindly, unsettled. Sporting a pot-
pourri of experienced and inex-
perienced players, the Gophers
could provide some stiff opposition
to the beefy men on opposing front
lines.
Senior End Steve Neils, who his
coach lavisly calls the finest at
his position in the Big Ten, and
giant sophomore Keith Simons was
a starting tackle in all Gopher
games last year. A mythical char-
acter of some reknown Simons has
transversed. 40 yards in a :4.75
time.
Linebackers form the basis of
the Minnesota solardity on defense
and all three have top level varsity
credentials.
Unfortunately for Gopher parti-
sans, those credentials are lacking
in the Gopher secondary as six of
eight lettermen have left the snow
covered ivy and campus of Min-
nesota.
Stoll has landed a, group of
Michigan recruits who could even-
tually crack the starting lineup and
with the loop's longest win streak
the people in Gold Country are
eagerly awaiting the- season. And
with the talent on hand the mining
experience could well yield a third
place finish.
Gopher gambit
5-15 at Ohio State
22 North Dakota
29 at Kansas
0- 6 Nebraska
13 Indiana
20 at Iowa
27 MICHIGAN
N- 3 at Northwestern
10 Purdue
17 at Illinois
24 Wisconsin

O

I
i

11
1

---m-mm mm- m" " mmm - ---- "mm m m m "-"m"m"mm -m-- ---- -m -mmm
!
i
50"OF! 50c OFI
* I
,
" U
A -A
* U
: MEDIUM or LARGE MEDIUM or LA
PIZZA jPIZZA
a "
WITH THIS COUPON WITH THIS COUPC
FOR DELIVERY ONLY FOR DELIVERY ONI
WE ALSO CARRY
CHICKEN-SHRIMP-SALADS
SUBMARINES-BURGERS-FRIES
CALL

omega
IA SALI

"

0

inspire
Sartans
(Continued from Page 9)
Stolz will find out quickly what
kind of club he has. The Spar-
tans opeirf ainst Northwestern
and Syracuse on the road, then
face UQLA, Notre Dame, and
Michigan in rapid succession.
"It's a blockbuster of a sched-
ule," he says.
But blockbuster or not, Denny
Stolz ismit backing down from
anything or anybody this year.
"I have no qualms in saying
that we'll be a contender in the
Big Ten this year and every
year. I wouldn't be here other-
wise.,,

I

-3

00

FREE-
DE

ask about our daily carry-out specials

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan