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September 14, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-14

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Friday, September 14, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, September 14, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

SEAVER SAVED

p

!. -

Bucs
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - "We're jelling at
last," said Willie Stargell. "We're
making the big plays and getting
the key hits."
Stargell got the key hit yes-
terday as the Pittsburgh Pirates,
finally having struggled into
first place in the National
League East, slapped down the
Chicago Cubs 6-1.
Stargell, the National League's
leading run producer, doubled
home two runs in the first in-
h ning and then scored on a single
by Rich Hebner. That was all
Bob Moose and reliever Ramon
Hernadez needed , to get the

march

Z-54

on

rl

SPORTS
NIGHT EDITORS
JEFF ROGER and CHOWN ROSSITER

Pirates their third triumph in the
vital four game series.
"Coming here and taking three
of four was something we had to
do," said Stargell. "And we were
able to do it. That's what's im-
portant.

Seecb &6"Stemn.
TV blackouts.. .
. . won't wash both ways
Dan Borus
In a recent issue of The Detroit Free Press, Sports Editor
Joe Falls, with whom I have disagreed on a number of subjects,
not the least of which was the sacking of Billy Martin, inveighed
mightily against Congressional action to end blackouts of Foot-
ball games.
Among other telling points Falls scores are these: that Con-
gress has no right to regulate the business affairs of the NFL
owners, that William Ford, owngr of the Lions, owes nothing to'
the public except that which any business man owes a con-
sumer, and that football telecasts of home games will hurt at-
tendance which will mean the biggest menace of.them all, PAY-
TV.
Mr. Falls' longing for the good old days of rampant laissez-
fairasm may be met with joy in Lion offices and may scare a
few fans, but his thinking is riddled with holes.
What Mr. Falls either forgets or chooses not to mention
is that-Mr. Ford and others of his like survive by the grace of
the American public. After all, wasn't it Congress, the elected
representatives of the American people, who gave the sport
immunity from anti-trust laws? The Congress approved the
1966 professional league merger, an anti-trust violation only
slightly less odious than the famed Hartford Insurance Group
ITT brouhaha.
Mr. Ford presides over a football club which holds a monop-
oly in this town and which has a hold over its players. Despite
the "liberal" reserve clause football brags about, a player is
stuck with a club because of Commissioner- Rozelle's policy to
more than liberally reward the club which the player has left.
This all exists by the grace of Congress.
What the NFL and its apologists, in this case Falls, want is
both sides of the street. They want to avoid acting in the public
interest like any other corporation when it runs against their
ability to increase profits, but they want public support to avoid
the law.
It won't wash both ways. Either the NFL is run in the public
interest and hence accept television for games sold out or it is
run as a private business and subject to anti-trust prosecution.
Let's explore Falls' contention that attendance will fall
in Detroit if television comes to home games. Maybe so, but
the Chicago Cub experience suggests otherwise. The Cubs
televise every one of their home games and they continually
draw over a million.
If Falls and the Lions believe that people will prefer the
simulated performance on a tube to the real thing, they are
underselling their product. Maybe inclement weather will
keep down some of the crowd, but it is my guess that for
every season ticket holder there are five who want to take
his place.
There may be a slight hitch in ticket sales, a momentary
lag, but without a doubt there will be a pick up in attendance
later on. All this loss of revenue propaganda sounds scary, but
it won't wash.
Just though you'd like to know what your friendly neighborhood
sports monopoly was up to.

Mets miraculous
PHILADELPHIA - Pinch-
hitter Wayne Garrett blooped. a
12-inning single, driving in the
tie-breaking run, and the New
York Mets topped Philadephia
4-2 last night.
The Mets had loaded the bases
with one out in the 12th when
Garrett batted for pitcher Tom
Seaver, 17-9, and looped an RBI-
single toshort left field. Moments
later, New York added another
run on a wild pitch by reliever
George Culver.
The Phillies gained a 1-0 lead
in the third inning of the base-
I ball game when Denny Doyle
singled with one out and Tommy
Hutton ripped an RBI double.
New York went ahead 2-1 in
the fourth with the help of an
unearned run.
Brewers blow
, BALTIMORE - Rookie Doug
Decinces ripped a 10th-inning sin-
gle, driving home pinch-runner
IEnos Cabell and lifting the Bal-
timore Orioles to a 7-6 victory
over Milwaukee last night.
The victory, combined with
Boston's loss at New York, re-
duced the Orioles' magic num-
bed for clinching baseball's
American League East title to
10 Any combination of Oriole
victories or Red Sox losses to-
taling 10 clinches the title for
Baltimore.
Brooks Robinson opened the
10th with a single and Cabell,
running for him, advanced to
third on two infield outs. After
an intentional walk to Merv
Rettenmund, Decinces delivered
the deciding hit.

I

GENUINE
LEE RIDERS
When you wear 'em,
:you'llknow they're right.

AP Photo
PITTSBURGH'S MANNY SANGUILLEN (35) gives Pirate teammate Willie Stargell (8) the standup
sign as Stargell crosses the plate behind Chicago catcher Randy Hundley in the Pirates 6-1 win yester-
day. The victory kept the Pirates atop the National League's East Division as well as giving Pitts-
burgh the distinction of being the only team in the division above .500.
ROZELLE YIELDS TO CONGRESS
Blackouts finally, put to.death

Corduroy
and
Denim

Look for this branded Lee label.

NEW YORK - National Foot-
ball League Commissioner Pete
Rozelle informed major television
networks yesterday to lift the
ban on televising sold-out home
games in the wake of Congres-
sional approval of a measure
banning blackouts of games sold
out 72 hours in advance.
Both the House and the Senate
approved the anti-blackout bill
yesterday and sent it to Presi-

dent Nixon, who is said to favor
such a measure.
Rozelle saia earlier in the day
he would tell the networks "that
we no longer consider them
bound by contractual provision
with the NFL prohibiting local
telecasts of games, providing all
seats are sold 72 hours before
kickoff."
Rozelle said the NFL intends to
adhere "to both the letter and
the spirit of this experimental
law despite our belief there will
be extremely negative results to
this legislation."
He also said: "We feel that
during the period of this experi-

ment, it will be shown that a
great number of people who pur-
chase tickets will not go to the
stadium."
"Our new contract starts next
year with the networks and if this
law becomes permanent and it
has the effect we expect it to
have, I feel the NFL will do
whatever is necessary to protect
at t e n d a n c e. at stadiums,"
Schramm said.
Rozelle said "the Game of the
Week concept presently used by
the other major sports-baseball,
basketball and hockey-is a pos-
sibility if damage to football is
evident."

BIVOUAC
ARMY-NAVY SURPLUS
518 East William

10-5:30

761-6207

Major Leoque Stndins

Join The Daily Ad Staff
Phone 764-0558

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

NATIONAL LEAGUE

East

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Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6
New York 2, Boston 1
Kansas City at California, inc.
Today's Games
New York at Baltimore, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 9 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 11 p.m.
Kansas City at California, 11 p.m.

Yesterday's Results
Pittsburgh 6,Chicago 1
New Y ork4, Philaidelphia 2, 12 inn.
Los Angeles 8, Houston 6
San Francisco at San Diego, inc.
T oday's Games
Pliaaephi at Montreal, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago at New York, 8:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Cincinnati, 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10:30 p.m.

..-.y

NATIURAL

rQOL)S

Natural Foods Store
. Supplements
" Groceries
Dairy
* Specialty Items
One of the largest, most
complete selections in town

longevity Cookery
* Natural Foods Restaurant
" Banquets and Catering
* Call in for carry-out

Comfortable
Atmosphere
Service
Prices

Hr 4P _1* -- __-----j

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