100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 14, 1973 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, September 14, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Laird diselost
consideration

AS
J

tax hike

LIKES STUDENTS

Page Three
I

by

Nixon

AP Photo
A WOUNDED CAMBODIAN CIVILIAN is aided by another in battered Kompong Cham, 47 miles north-
east of Phnom Penh, where insurgents still vie for control.
Greatest battle loss in three
years reported In 1Cambodia
wP a

WASHINGTON (P) - President man Wilbur Mills of the tax-writ- Under this proposal, which Laird
Nixon may ask Congress for a ing House Ways and Means Com- said Nixon was considering, the
temporary 10 per cent hike in mittee, who added in a telephone President would have the' power to
federal tax rates with the money interview that "My guess is that set each year, subject to veto by
irefunded to taxpayers later-in the President isn't close to making Congress, the amount' of credit
a forced savings plan intended to such a recommendation." companies could claim for such
cool the economy, the White HouseL investments as plant improvement.
said yesterday. hospital for treatment of a back At present, the investment tax
Presidential counselor M e l v i n ailment did not take a firm posi- credit is 7 per cent.
Laird disclosed Nixon's consider- ailn di nha afirm posi- During his 1972 re-election cam-
tion on the plan which he called' ag io lde ohl h
ation of the unusual tax plan but "more of a forced savings" rather paign Nixon pledged to hold the
said no final decision had been than a tax increase. "But no mat- line against new taxes. And, as
made on it. late as Monday in his second State
Lr ster what you call it, when a man of the Union message, Nixon said
ther saeds tax increalasnbt!sees more being taken out of his his administration "'continues its
ther saeasie tax cea e, bu paycheck, he considers it a tax tongoition toatax in-
rather a device to remove income increase," Mills said. crease."
temporarily from the economy in Mills repeated his opposition to Laird, asked about the apparent
an effort to fight inflation. another proposal mentioned by conflict, said the temporary 10 per
The presidential adviser told a Laird-a variable investment tax cent hike would not violate Nixon's
White House news briefing that credit ranging from four to 15 per pledge because "this is not the
the tentative proposal Nixon or- cent. same as a tax increase."
dered studied by his economic
aides could work this way:
ac aeindiidual andiscrporate C
Ec iniiuladcroaetaxpayer would have his tax rate u t ues mtul
increased by 10 per cent. In other
cent tax bracket would find him-t
self paying at a rate of 22 per agreementon tapes
cent.
The extra taxes collected woulds
go into an escrow account and WASHINGTON (P) - A federal Nixon, his lawyer and Cox meet
would be returned to the taxpayer appeals court suggested yesterday and decide among themselves what
at a later time when the economy that President Nixon let special parts of the controversial tapes
cools and inflation ebbs. Laird Watergate prosecutor Archibald could be submitted to the Water-
spoke of the refunds coming in two Cox listen to White House tape re- gate grand jury.
to five years. cordings as a possible means of
Presumably, the taxpayer would avoiding a judicial - executive The judges cautioned, however,
receive interest on the forced sav- branch showdown in the courts. that their compromise proposal did
ings account. Laird did not dis- not hint at what course they might
cuss this point, but interest pay- Cox quickly agreed to follow the take if forced to rule whether Nix-
ments were one feature of such proposed compromise. The White on must give up the tapes for in-
ma plan presented by Federal Re- House had no immediate com- spection.
serve Board Chairman Arthur ment. In an unsigned memorandum, the
Burns. U.S. Court of Appeals said its
Laird would not set a specific anyone other than some current promise would avoid ahead-to-
timetable for a presidential de- and former aides hear the tapes head clash between the courts and
cision, but said he doubted Con- of conversations about the theaPresident. Nixon claims the
gress could consider such a plan gate affair. t
until next year. The appeals court advanced a judges have no jurisdiction in the
This view was echoed by Chair- suggested compromise by which case.
CINEMA II presents TONIGHT ONLY
GRETA GARBO in

341 S. MAIN ANN ARBOR
A moving experience in sound and light
Live Entertainment Sundays

NOW SHOWING
Evenings 7 & 9:15
Saturda* & Sunday Matinee 2 & 4:15

i

By AP and Reuter the airport and several key points,
KOMPONG CHAM - The gover- in the western suburbs.

nor and military commander of "Bu
government forces' in besieged isolat
Kompong Cham reported yesterday generz
the heaviest.-losses of the opposing
forces in a single action in the arms
three and a half years of war inams
Cambodia. . pongt
Maj. Gen Sar Hor said 1,000 sol- vastat
diers and civilians were killed and for C
5,000 wounded in the recent battle were
for the provincial capital. -InI
Another 20,000 to, 30,000 residents miles
were led off by pro-communist in- ment
surgents who briefly occupied the cleari
capital, Sar Hor-said. He estimat- the se
ed insurgent troop casualties at as w
2,000 dead or wounded. Batta
Sar Hor, speaking to newsmen at ed cu
the governor's palace, said insur- On
gents still controlled sections of conse
the city's university, the road to pieces
for th
THE MICHIGAN DAILY called
t ~~Vol. LXXXIV, No. 8 -"-
Friday, September 14, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published~
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-locai mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

t in the city there' are only
ed enemy elements left," the
al said.
y sporadic mortar and small-
fire could be heard in Kom-
Cham yesterday, but the de-
tions of the week-long battle
dambodia's third largest city
widely evident.
Phnom Penh, the capital 47
to the southwest, the govern-
reported some advances in
ng Phnom Penh's road to
ea. But that road, Highway 4,
ell as Highway 5 to rice-rich
mbang Proviifte, r e m a in-
ut by Khmer Rouge forces.
Highway 4, cut for the 19th
cutive day, 155mm artillery
s were brought into the area
he first time. Air strikes were
d in against insurgent forces

along the road to the deepwater
port of Kompong Som.
The first Mekong River convoy
in more than a week was ap-
proaching Phnom Penh and made
the trip with only one incident. One
of five tankers was hit by several
rounds of rifle fire and set aflame,
but crewmen were able to put out
the fire in two hours.
Kompong Cham, once a rich rub-
ber center and resort town, had a
population of about 70,000 before
major 'military operations in the
area began. Recent refugees had
added to that figure, although an
exodus started once the battle for
the city began.
Sar Hor indicated the enemy had
suffered too much for another seri-
ous attack soon.
"If we had had American air sup-
port it would have been easier.
But we have been forced to rely on
our own strength," he said.

I
I
__

roject Community
2210 Michigan Union
763-3548
Become involved in your community
for course credit
* Child care and development
program
I nnovativeTIutorial Experience
* inmate Project
Project Community Course

ANNA CHRKSTIE
directed by CLARENCE BROWN 1930
In her first talking picture, an adaptation of Eugene O'Neill's play, Garbo is even
more interesting with the addition to her silent aura. "She Talks!" Greta Garbo,
Marie Dressier.
friday, Sept. 14 aud a angell hall 7:00, 9:00 $1.00
SATURDAY NIGHT: Alec Guiness in THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT
SUNDAY NIGHT: Rene Clement's GERVAISE

SPECIAL LATE SHOW
Friday & Saturday Night 11:30
Separate Admission $1.50
MICK JAGGER and JAMES FOX
A highly cohesive, artistic statement. An important,
timely and original motion picture.-L.A. Free Press

r1

I,

r

I

1I.

Couzens Film Coop Presents
A NIGHT
AT THE OPERA
with the MARX BROTHERS
Fri. & Sat.-8 & 10 p.m.
$5 for 27 movies
or 75c each
COUZENS CAFETERIA

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

e

. .. .................. .... .. ...":t .-r, .. '..,:".:: .',.: ..."::t"; ... . .... . . ...it >?c't\hiK:i}T'.ft .r
ROBERT JOHN GEORGE
Indiii Drawings
a UNION GALLERY
1st Floor, Michigan Union
:_. :t .. .r.. .. . . :..._ ... .. :J......., ..";::. -.... . .. . . . . . . . .. .rh .. .C".::: ...~J:: :::::. . ., . .:rh .:}tY ,t"::x' .- "T }/r.:; <f.
~Reception for artist,Friday, Sept. 14-7-10 p.m.
:....: . ., .... . . . *.*. ....n- . - .{{ :x f................. .. . . ,~ .* . . . . F ,r t.*.*.*. . ... . . . . .'?, :itJ:: . .
.y....*.* ...*.*.*.*.* . . '. . . . . . . .-- . . . . *. . *.*.*... . .... ..... ......... ..*. . ... .. ..*. t.. ":.}',- .{ .*.4.* . ..*r:...::*.*$,."'. .. r *. *-*.*.*.r.. .*..: %: {ii.:..:::.. . . . .
GALLERY HOURS: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to $ p.m.
:.:: v : : , . .:?^ .::u:.. r ...... ...v. ...-. .. ..... . . . ,. ......:.. . ..... v{...... ...... .....:.................. ....n .. .. ..:::: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ....... } .: i ...,.... . .xi
.}.... . . .. : r x "4 t.... -.F......- .. . .. .. . .: . ..: .v -. ::: :.v"-:: :.... . . . . . . .... . . ............. . . . . . . .. n ~ : ::. ..... -, u"::\ ..vi.. .. ..- ~ ..\ :.v u-'.. . . -. ::. .J. .... . . .{ . ....:.. \ . . . -: .:.. .. . .. 1 :: :} .. f .. .. } } : ;;v . w : h > :". , . . ..
,r . ...44. .:.:.. .... .. -h.:v: ~ .T. :'i Jf}{...':.:i4':..............................:::+{.: } .- ..........n .:k
long days jo|Urney Mio nih
* Based on Eugene O'Neill's haunt-
ing autobiographical plIa y, this
1962 film was highly honored at
KATHARINE HEPBURN, RALPH RICH-
ARDSON, J a s o n Robords, Jr., Dean
Stockwell.

for Miss J's sportdressed look,
the proof is in the plaid. ..and
tis a beauty in oxford grey/red/camel tiro f.
woven acrylic. From Four Corners in
sizes 5-13. . .sweaters sized S-M-L.
A. Blazer with accent buckles, sizes 5-15. $41.
Pants with natural waist, $21.
Long sleeve rib turtleneck sweater, grey, $15.
B. Cropped jacket with side buckles, $34.
Hip-stitched pleated skirt, $19.
Polyester/cotton foulard long sleeve
red floral print shirt, $15.
V-neck sleeveless pullover sweater-
vest in cabled nylon, camel, $11.
4~ Y

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan