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September 13, 1973 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-13

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Page Seven

Thursday, September 13, 1973 ,

_.: - . _.

U.S.

delays

recognition of

new Chilean government

WASHINGTON 6P) - Amid of-
ficial denials of U. S. involve-
ment in Chile's military coup,
the State Department yesterday
appeared disposed to bide its
time before making contact with
the new government leadership
in Santiago.
The sensitivity of Washington's
- -
Insurgents
driven out
of. capital
PHNOM PENH (P)-The Cam-
bodian command claimed on yes-
terday its troops have cleared
Communist-led rebels from most
of th besieged provincial capital
of Kompong Cham.
The government asknowledged
that Khmer Rouge insurgents
still held key points around the
city but said its forces were try-
ing to trap the remaining rebel
elements on the southwestern
edges.
THE COMMAND spokesman,
Col. Am Rong, said government
units linked up on Phnom Penh's
road to the sea - Highway 4 -
at a point 40 miles southwest of
Phnom Penh. But the raid re-
mained cut near Ang Snuol
about 16 miles from the capital.
Highway 5 to the fertile rice
paddies of Battambang Province
to the northwest remained closed
about 50 miles north of Phnom
Penh.
At Kompong Cham, 47 miles
northeast of Phnom Penh, Am
Rong said insurgents still con-
trolled sections of the city's uni-
versity complex, a textile fac-
tory and the Angkor pagoda, all
on the western peripheries of the
city.
HE SAID the rebels also con-
trolled the road between the city
and its airport three miles to the
north and remained entrenched
around the airport.
Focus of government opera-
tions appeared to be the south-
western corner where govern-
ment forces hoped to block all
escape routes for the insurgents.
The area is bordered by the Me-
kong River on the west and the
Boeng Snay Lake on the east.
A Western doctor said the
medical situation in Kompong
Cham was becoming critical.
Preliminary estimates indicate
government forces suffered 300
to 400 killed in the battle for the
city, with about 15 per cent re-
sulting from inadequate medical
care.
A PHOTOGRAPHER for The
Associated Press returning from'
Kompong Chain said food and
water shortages were severe.
The photographer, Shhor Yuthi,
said whole blocks in the city's
basically residential southern sec-
tion were engulfed in flames and
that bodies were still st'ewn in
some city streets.

relationship with the new mili-
tary junta was underscored by
charges from leftist groups here
and in Latin American that the
responsibility for Tuesday's ous-
ter of President Salvador Allen-
de lay not in Santiago but in
Washington.
DEMONSTRATIONS w i t h an-
ti-American overtones were re-
ported in Argentina, Mexico and
Costa Rica, among other coun-
tries. In Washington, 150 demon-
strators gathered near the White
House bearing placards saying
"Let Chile's Democracy Live."
State Department spokesman
Paul Hare said the coup, Latin
America's bloodiestin many
years, was a Chilean "internal
matter" and that no elements of
the U. S. government were in-
volved.
"I am confident of the grounds
on which I speak," Hare told
newsmen.
BASED ON past experience,
State Department officials said it
was not surprising that the U.
S. was accused of complicity in
the takeover.
It was clear that Washington's
policy for the moment is to avoid
too close an initial identification
with the junta. To do otherwise,
officials said, would only feed
speculation that the United
States inspired the plot. It was
understood t h a t Washington
would allow several other gov-
ernments to recognize the junta
before it makes its move.
P r i 'o r to recognizing a
new government, the State De-
part normally determines whe-
ther the regime intends to ob-
serve its international obligations
and is in effective control of the
country. On the latter point, re-
ports of widespread resistance

in Chile to the new leadership
raised questions about its capa-
city to govern.
ASSUMING THE junta is able
to consolidate its power, there
was little doubt that relations be-
tween the two countries would
improve, notwithstanding a ser-
ies of nagging bi-laterial prob-
lems inherited from the Allende
administration.
Foremost among these is the
uncompensated expropriation of
American copper mining inter-
ests in Chile. The Allende gov-
ernment maintained that the two
firms involved, the Anaconda
Co. and the Kennecott Copper
Corp., accrued excess profits
which amount to $734 million
more than Chile's estimate of the
value of the nationalized prop-
erty.
The State Department claims
the Allende policy constituted
retroactive taxation and insists

the firms be compensated for the
book value of the property.
ANOTHER problem facing the
two governments is to reach
agreement on the terms of re-
payment for Chile's debt of more
than $2 billion to U. S. agencies.
Bi-latera ldiscussions on these
and other problems were held
here in December and in March
but there was no report of pro-
gress.

DAiLY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Thursday, September 13
DAY CALENDAR
Geology & Mineralogy Lecture: D.
Yaalon, Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem,
"Factors Controlling the Deposition &
Distribution of Airborne Salt & Dust
Over the Land Surface," 2501 C. C.
Little Bldg., 4 pm.
Nuclear Physics Lecture: P. Soper,
Univ. of Surrey, "Adiabatic Theory of
Deuteron Stripping & Elastic Scatter-
ing," P-A ColloquiumRm., 4 pm.
Art Dept.: G. Kasle, "The Satisfac-
tion of the Art Dealer," Arch. Aud.,
4:15 pm.
Speech - Communication Dept.: K.
Pike, "How We Communicate by
Means Other Than Verbal Language,"
W. Conf. Rm., Rackham, 7 pm.

HISTORY BUFFS
Cambridge Histories
Z25/cOFF
thru Sept. 14th
PREPAID BASIS
DAVID'S BOOKS
663-8441
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING RESULTS

Bring a box of salt
For Tequilla Night Discount
THURSDAYS
OPEN 11 :00 2:00
A PU 1in A-/wr iencei n s und and light
341 S. MAIN ANN ARBOR
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT SUNDAYS

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Yep-short for CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGAN-
IZATION, a group composed of students,
faculty, alumni and friends. Please feel
free to meet with us.
THURSDAYS-7:15 p.m--4202 MICHIGAN UNION
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I

FOCUS GROUPS
Counseling Services, Office of Student Services
growth-oriented shall group experiences with trained leaders
AVAILABLE THIS SEMESTER
(groups meet weekly unless otherwise specified)
* Couples Group.
* Weekend Couples Group.
* Consciousness raising for handicapped students.
" Eastern ways of being.
" Playing professional roles.
" Experiencing Human' Mortality.
" Interchange-behavioral self-modification.
" Weekend Gestalt worksop.
" Groups for new people in town.
* Astrology and personality.
" Art Group
To register for these groups you MUST attend
a group orientation meeting on Wed.; Sept. 12
OR Thurs., Sept. 13 at 7:30 p.m. 1035 Angell
Hall.
FOR INFORMATION CALL BURT GROSSMAN, 764-8437

t
PIZZA BOB'S PIZZA TRUCK'S PIZZA ROUTE
East Quad 5,00 & 11100 Delta Gamma 9135
Oxford Housing 5120 & 11120 Delta Sigma Phi 9142
Stockwell Hall 5135 & 11135 Trigon 9149
Mosher-Jordan 5150 & 11,50 Lambda Chi Alpha 9156
Mary Markley 6.10 & 12.10 Phi Delta Theta 10103
Cousens Hall 6.35 & 12135 Theta Chi 10110
Alice Lloyd 6.55 & 12,55 Alpha Tau Omega 10117
Bursley Hall 7120 & 1120 Tau Kappa Epsilon 10124
- Sia<: m PhiQ100 I'Ia....1n..'2

We invited a few friends for dinner
and they helped clean up the Genesee River.

With the aid of a few thousand pounds of microorga-
nisms, we're helping to solve the water pollution problem in
Rochester. Maybe the solution can help others.
What we did was to combine two processes in a way
that gives us one of the most efficient water-purifying sys-
tems private industry has ever developed.
One process is called "activated sludge," developed
by man to accelerate nature's microorganism adsorption.

(At Kodak, we were working on environmental improvement,
long before it made headlines.) And the pilot project worked
so well, we built a ten-million-dollar plant that can purify
36-million gallons of water a day.
Governor Rockefeller called this "the biggest volun-
tary project undertaken by private industry in support of
New York State's pure-water program."
Why did we do it? Partly because we're in business to

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