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September 13, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-13

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Thursday, September 13, 1 X73

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

N.Y. Dolls
Raucous, v

rock

'n

roll...

ulgar,

beautiful

By BRUCE MEYER
UPI feature writer
They are far from being gifted
musicians. Their music is coarse,
vulgar, simplistic and loud. They
wear makeup, lipstick and six-
inch heels. They are the New
York Dolls, and you have to love
rock 'n' roll to appreciate how
beautiful they are.
David Johansen, the Dolls' lead
singer, says:
"Rock 'n' roll is hard to de-
fine. The function of a rock 'n'
roll band is to relieve adoles-

We're the third generation of
rock . . ."
The Dolls have attracted a
tremendous amount of attention
from New York media types,
but except for a couple of ar-
ticles in national rock publi-
cations, they are little known
outside the environs of Greater
New York. Their first album,
New York Dolls (Mercury SRM-
1675), should help change all
that.
The band has managed to put
on record all the crude power of

lating a band's music as accur-
ately as possible into a record-
without imposing his own ideas
between the band and the lis-
tener.
I'm very tempted to jump on
the Dolls' bandwagon, to say
they will he to the 70's what =El-
vis was to the 50's, and what the
Stones and Beatles were to the
60's, to say their first single,

"Trash," will be a big hit.
But I'm just not sure whether
the timing is right. Good as they
are, the Dolls may be here a
little too soon. It's been a con-
sistent problem for New York
bands in the past - being too far
ahead of the rest of the country,
and being so out of touch as to
not recognize the problem.

ARTS

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
And the beat goes on . . .
Luther Allison helps carry on a bit of the Blues and Jazz Festival spirit last night at the Primo Showbar in Ann Arbor. He is sched-
uled to make one more appearance there tonight.

'

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE (across from Law School)
FRIDAY NOON BUFFET LUNCH
LUNCH: 40c (our 17th year of lunch-speakers)
THE THEME FOR SEPT., OCT. WILL BE:
"Moral and Ethical Leadership of the Nation"
-THIS FRIDAY-
"A RELIGIOUS APPRAISAL OF WATERGATE'
DR. THEODORE KACHEL
DIR., U.M. OFFICE OF ETHICS & RELIGION
COMING SPEAKERS:
PROF. PORTER, Journalism; Poet DONALD HALL; U.M. Presi-
dent FLEMING; PROF. FISFEL, Economics;PROF. CHAMBERS,
Low; U.M. Vice President JOHNSON.

Friends

Roa dshow sizes up

local. audience

for pantomime

By BILL IRVINE
Festival-goers intending to be
submerged in blues and jazz last
weekend may have caught a
taste of another art: pantomime
by the Friends' Roadshow. And it
may not be the last we see of
them.
An English troupe which nor-
mally performs with the London
Mime Company, the Friends'
Roadshow mimed between sets at
the Blues and Jazz Festival and
early this week at the Ark coffee-
house.
They have been sent to this
country to size up American
audiences and explore possibili-
ties concerning an upcoming tour
of the complete London company.
So, according to Nola Rae, the
Roadshow's only female member,
the troupe plays wherever they
find an audience-often a spon-
taneous affair.
Athough most of the mimes
have had little or no formal
training in their art, Rae, once a

ballet student, trained with the
famous Marcel Marceau. Member
Jango Edwards taught himself
mime while he worked for the
Ringling Brothers Circus.
A typical Roadshow perform-
ance, such as the one Tuesday
night at the Ark, consists of
plenty of light humor. With
painted faces and a makeshift
stage; the Roadshow presented a
series of skits on a wide range
of subject matter.
In one skit the Great Xandu,
played by Michael Lynch, climb-
ed onto a chair and actually
dived head first into a styrofoam
cup filled with water.
In another piece Eddie, por-
trayed by Edwards, imitated,
among other things, a blind po-
tato (no eyes . . . get it?), a
grasshopper with its legs cut off,
and a talking palm tree.
Rae shined in askit portraying
the fable of the raven and the
fox.
Edwards and Rae collaborated

with success in several skits: Ed-
wards as a ventriloquist with
Rae as his dummy, and Rae as
a circus knife-thrower with Ed-
wards as her "victim."
Often accompanied by the
piano playing of David Norkett,
the skits were , written by the
Roadshow players themselves.
When not performing, the
mimes in the Roadshow often
teach their skills to others. They
have taught, for instance, at
tev.
tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Andy Griffith
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Lilias, Yoga and You
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 1IDream of Jeannie
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Making Things Grove
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 Mission Impossible
56 Course of Our Times
7:30 2 what's My Line?
4 You Asked For It6
7 Treasure Hunt
9 Bewitched
56 why You Smoke

several youth centers in England.
At present, the future of the
Friends' Roadshow is unsettled.
It's not easy to make a living
miming, as you might well ex-
pect. According to Rae, the im-
mediate goal of the troupe is to
become self-supporting.
Continuing on their three-week
U.S. tour, the Roadshow will ap-
pear tomorrow night at the Uni-
versity of Detroit before travel-
ling east.
8:00 2 The Waltons
4 Rowan and Martin
7 Movie
"Evel Knievel,"
4 Ironside
9 News
9:30 9 Happy Though Married
56 Jazz Set
10:00 4 NBC Follies-Variety
Debut
7 Streets of San Francisco
9 MS'
50 Perry Mason
56 Masterpiece Theatre
10:30 9 Singalong Jubilee
11:00 ? 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:30 2 Movie
"The Biggest Bundle of Them
Aill." (1968)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Pro Football Preview
9 News
50 Movie
"Behind the Iron Curtain."
(1948)
1'.:00 9 Movie
"Winchester for Hire" (Italian
1967)
1:00 4 7 News

cents of their ills . . . and I think
the Dolls fulfill it amply."
There is only one clear com-
parison to be made with the
Dolls,frustrating as it is for a
band that would like to estab-
lish its own identity: They are
like the early Rolling Stones. The
Dolls have the same sort of raw
street-brawler feel to their mu-
sic, hard as a steel-toed patent
leather boot and mean as a
drunken roller derby queen.
All but one of the five Dolls
are native New Yorkers - guita-
rist Sylvain Sylvain was born in
Cairo, Egypt, and raised in Paris
-and they come from the tough-
er parts of the city. They've been
together as a band for about a
year and a half.
"Right now I think we're con-
sidered an underground group,"
Johansen says. "But I don't want
to be in an underground group. I
want to be in a popular group.
1:30 2 Movie
"Fair wind to Java"
(1953)
3:00 2 Mayberry R.F.D.
3:30 2 News
9 Telescope
56 Playhouse New York:
The 1940s
50 Night Gallery
8:30 9 Beachcombers
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Movie
"The Hot Rock" (1972)
wacbn

their music, without reducing the
studio to total anarchy. No vir-
tuoso musicians are the Dolls, but
they know what they want to
say and how to say it.
A heaping spoonful of credit for
success of the album must go to
producer Todd Rundgren. Rund-
gren's progress as a producer
over the past year or two has
been incredible, And with New
York Dolls he has achieved the-
peak of the producer's art: trans-

ROBERT JOHN GEORGE.0
India Drawings
September 14-29-29
UNIOYN GffALLEURY
1st Floor, Michigan Union
.... . ..*.,.... ...:.... . .... . ....:... . .;: .;:.;: ri;; ..::: .}f:J . :i. .....:".:.::. .. .':, v:":'.-.-.,..........J.....,
Reception for artist, Friday, Sept, 14-7-10.p.m.,
GALLERY HOURS: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to S p.m.
./ . .... :: . .. .....> .>... ,

MUSIC-The Bach Club sponsors ;ts organizational meeting
tonight at 8 in Greene Lounge, E. Quad. The club's tradi-
tional snack, jelly donuts, will be served afterward; The
Primo Showbar presents Luther Allison, fiesh from the
blues and jazz festival.
FILM-The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents its Twilight
Zone Festival at 7 p.m. in Aud. A; The New World Film
Co-op .shows Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five at
7:30 and 9:45 in MLB, Aud. 3 and presents Alice in Won-
derland at 7:30 and 9:45 in MLB, Aud. 4; Cinema Guild
screens LaCava's My Man Godfrey in Arch. Aud. at 7
and 9:05.

7
9
12
3
6
6:30
7:30
11

Morning Show
Rock
Progressive
Folk/Rock/Progressive
News Sports
Latino America
Jazz/Bi es
Progressive

IWO F ' J4

CAMPUS THEATRE 0 1214 S. University * Dial 668-6416
JOSEPH E LEVINE ACADEMY
EN DS o>MKE NICHOLS z N WANRD
LAWRENC TURMANWBNET
THURS.! Y\ DIRECTOR
NICHOLS
MIKE
DOU BLE JosephE Levine presents a
FEATUREMike NichosFIm TlA
Camal Knowledge GRADUATE
STARTS FRIDAY
ROSS HUNTER'S"Musical Production of
Music by BURT BACHARACH'"Lyncsby HAL DAVID
ARY KRAMERI"RSS HUNTER}i NHESJA RO1T

I

AUDITIONS
FOUR SHOWS
University Players Major Bill and showcase productions
THE STRONGBOX-2518 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES NOV. 7-10)
CYMBELINE-2528 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES DEC. 5-8)
AND MISS REARDON DRINKS A LITTLE-
2508 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES NOV. 29, 30, AND DEC. 1)
THE MARRIAGE OF MR. MISSISSIPPI-
2512 Frieze Bldg.
(PERFORMANCES OCT. 25-27)
TODAY: 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
COME AND MEET US
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
MASS MEETINGS-SEPT. 10-14
201 MULHOLLAND (off W. Washington)

Sculpted walls & ceilings will take you
back to Old Bavaria. Those were the days
when foaming steins of German draft
were served by jolly Biermeisters and
fun was had by all.
Come, visit a new place teeming with
all those Bavarian traditions.
Come visit the NEW HEIDELBERG
RATHSKELLER.

SHOW TIMES 7 & 9:15
mas ~ri* eo

215 N. Main a 663-7758 a Plenty of Parking in Kear

NEW WORLD FILM COOP-presents-

I

I

TONIGHT
Direct from Three Memorable Performances at the
ANN ARBOR BLUES & JAZZ FESTIVAL
the
BROOKLYN
BLUES
EL UB

SEPT. 10
SEPT. 11
SEPT. 12

7:30-10:00 P.M.-PUBLICITY, BOX OF-
FICE, USHERS, MEMBERSHIP AND NON-
SHOW ACTIVITIES
7:30-10:00 P.M.-SET CONSTRUCTION
PAINTING AND DESIGN, LIGHTS AND
SOUND
7:30-DOORS OPEN
8 :00-ACTING
8:30-DIRECTING
9:00-WORKSHOPS AND ONE ACT
PRODUCTIONS
9:30-STAGE MANAGEMENT

I

This bizarre rendition of the Lewis Carroll classic, patterned after the
Tenniel drawings, features such intriguing casting as Gary Cooper- as
The white Knight. Cary Grant as the Mock Turtle, Edward Everett
Horton as the Mad Hatter, and Jack Oakie and Rosco Karns as Tweedle-
dum and Tweedledee. W.C. Fields plays Humpty-Dumpty, and delivers
superb in-character readings of author's nonsense verse.

* IN KURT VONNEGUT'S *
SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE
Winner 1972 Cannes Film Festival-Jury prize and award. "One of the
most daring, origina ,and totaly fascinating pictures ever made.

THUSDAY ONLY, Sept. 12 and 13
7:30 and 9:45 P.M.
(Wed.-Natural Science Aud., Thurs.-Modern Languages Aud.)_

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