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September 13, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-13

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k Page Three

f x

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Shoppers get break as
beefp rices remain stable,

Shoppers used to pinching their
pennies got a break at the super-
market on Wednesday: plenty of
beef at the meat counters and
big sale signs in the windows.
The situation was still unset-
tled two days after the end of
the beef price ceiling and the be-
ginning of new regulations on oth-
er foods. But an Associated Press
survey found that prices in most
areas were stable and in a few
cities there were declines.
"MRS. CONSUMER has won
the battle," said a New York
meat wholesaler. He said more
and more cattle was being slaugh-
tered and there might be a glut
on the market. "The consumer
is not prepared to eat that much
meat," he said.
A marketing specialist for the
Agriculture Department in Chi-
cago said markets seemed to be
returning to normal and he ex-
pected prices for live cattle to
remain for some time "reason-
able close to where they are
now."
Prices at representative mark-
ets today were generally mixed,
showing no wide changes from
previous days.
"THE MARKETS seem to be
settling down so that things are
based on supply and demand,"
said Rick Keene of the USDA in
Chicago.
The number of cattle for sale
Wednesday increased, which was
another sign that uncertainty
-since controls were lifted was
lessening.

Keene said that 12,600 slaugh-
ter cattle were sold at represen-
tative markets, compared w i t h
11,800 last week. This was still
down, however, from 18,100 of a
Wednesday a year ago.
WILLIAM GROSS, public rela-
tionis manager for Safeway Stores
in San Francisco, said increased
supply had caused lower prices
on some items. Irvin Huff, meat
buyer for Associated Food Stores
on the West Coast also said sup-
ply had improved, but he said it
was too soon to tell what would
happen in the next few weeks.
Even the experts couldn't
agree. Dahl Bahr, meat buyer
for the Big Bear chain of stores
in Ohio, said that prices w o ul d
fluctuate for a while, then would
settle at levels above the ceil-
ing. "Any consumer who thinks
beef will go down is engaging
in wishful thinking," Bahr said.
At the same time, however,
John Davis of Ohio Packing Co.
noted that cattle prices had re-
mained steady and a d d e d:
"There's no way beef prices won't
go down."
SEVERAL New York City
chains said they were lowering
beef prices as a competitive
move. Pathmark said it was
selling some cuts at 15 per cent
below the previous ceiling price.
Stores in Hartford, Conn., ad-
vertised a variety of, beef sales
this week. Ground chuck, which
had been $1.09 a pound, was on
sale at 99 cents a pound and por-
terhouse steak was $1.79 a pound,

compared to $1.99 earlier.
The Connecticut Agriculture De-
partment said dairy prices were
rising, with butter at $1.05 a;
pound, compared to 87 cents-
three weeks ago. But the depart-1
ment newsletter said ground
chuck, boiled ham, chickens and
chuck steaks were "outstanding
buys."
SOUTH CAROLINA officials
said more livestock were being
sold this week than last. There
were nearly 2,000 animals sold
Tuesday at four major markets,
In some cases, store officials
said they simply hadn't gotten
new price lists from their sup-
pliers. "I'm paying more for my
beef, but the customers aren't,"
said Ron Pitts, manager of a
Publix supermarket in Miami. "I
can't raise my prices until I get
new price sheets from the com-
pany and I don't have them yet.
I could get new price lists this
afternoon or tomorrow and the
prices will go up."
R. L. Thompson, sales director
for A&P in Dallas, said, "Beef
prices are fairly steady . . . We
do not think there is going to
be a radical increase in prices in
the next few weeks . . . How-
ever, other groceries are going
up. They were selling below
costs and prices now are catch-
ing up."

" = "t _be ySTARTS FRIDAY
CThei'8 p SuckLking
. ,as a per'fecii n1~Piagr5.
-ENDS THURSDAY-
Open 12:45 - Shows at1pm
3:35, 6:10, 8:50
THE NUMBER ONE BOOK
OF THE YEAR!
NOW-THE SUSPENSE
FILM OF THE YEAR!
Fred Zinnetuanu's fim if
THME
01r yP I' M1Trrkv Id-tgcno ;.1
JACKAL ....r..
UM- U

CATTLEMEN DRIVE a herd of Herefords through the town of Meadow Valley in Northern California
yesterday following the lifting of the federal rice freeze on beef Monday. Although cattle sales have
increased since the end of the freeze, it rmains unclear whether beef prices will come down.
FIVE VOTE MARGIN:
U.S. House sustains Nixon'S
vne
veto on e wal e Tu Ce bil

I

4A(U mediatrics
presents
Slaughterhouse Five

WASHINGTON (R) - Presid
Nixon scored a tight five-vo
victory in a showdown yesterd
in the House on a vetoed medi
services bill. It left Nixon unbe
en by Congress this year in fi
veto fights.
The vote was 273 favoring
veto override, to put the billi
to law over Nixon's objection
144 supporting the President'sr
jection of the bill, and one me
ber voting "present." This w
five votes short of the requir
two-thirds majority.
W atergat
probe to
end Nov.
WASHINGTON (P) - Seek
to wrap up its probe quickly, 1
Senate Watergate commit
Wednesday voted unanimously
resume public hearings Sept.
and attempt to complete the
by Nov. 1.
Chairman Sam Ervin (D-N.C
said the panel would "exped
the proceedings by hearing w
nesses with highly relevant te
imony" only. He said the co
mittee was "not responding
all to pressure" to keep the he
ings from public view.
COMMITTEE aides were qu
to note that Nov. 1 is only
target date and suggested th
the committeoe won't stick to
if it uncovers dramatic new
formation about political sab
tage and campaign financing
the 1972 presidential race.
These matters will come u
der scrutiny when the panel cor
pletes the Watergate phase ofi
investigation.
There is little question t h<
oommittee senators have 1c
their taste for the long and
tailed examination of the ty
they conducted into the Wate
gate break-in and White Hou
cover-up. Before summer rece
they operated on a five-d
weekly schedule of hearings;
the last six weeks of hearing
they hope to meet three days
week.
SOME COMMITTEE sourc
say a general feeling now exi
that the special Watergate pr
secutor's office appears tol
doing its job and that the coi
mittee's hearings at this sta
can only interfere with other
vestigations.
"The committee 'rejected th
argument last spring, but th
was before they knew what 1
prosecutors were going to do,'
Senate aide said.

ent WHILE THE Senate had voted
cte 77 to 16 last month to override,
ay or 15 more than the necessary
cal two-thirds, the action by the
at- House means 'the legislation is
ive dead.
President Nixon expressed his
a pleasure at the House action. A
in- White House statement said the
ns, President feels. those who voted
re to sustain the veto "deserve the
m- thanks of all Americans for their
vas actions" and/ for joining in his
ed efforts of fighting inflation.
Six Democrats joined 138 Re-
publicans in support of the Pres-
ident, while 227 Democrats and
46 Republicans voted to override
the veto.
THE BILL would have author-
ized $185 million for new federal
aid programs designed to devel-
op emergency medical service
systems aimed at preventing
needless deaths of heart attack
and accident victims. Nixon ve-
toed it Aug. 1, saying it was
too costly and infringed on the
ing role of state and local govern-
the ments.
tee The Legislation also would have
to required the Nixon administration
24 to keep operating Public Health
em Service hospitals in Seattle, Bos-
ton, Baltimore, San Francisco,
.), New Orleans, Galveston, Tex.,
ite Staten Island, N.Y., and Norfolk,
wit- Va.
,st-
rm- THE HOSPITALS are being
at kept open under a federal court
ar- injunction. Nixon objected to con-
tinued operation of in-patient fa-
ick cilities of the hospitals which re
a said have "outlived their useful-
hat ness."
-it 1- .

Rep. Harley Stagger (D-W. Va.),
chairman of the House Com-
merce Committee and chief au-
thor of the, vetoed bill, said the
legislation was aimed at saving
thousands of lives by providing
fast emergency care by trained
personnel.
House Speaker Carl Albert (D-
Okla.), said the "reputation of
the House of Representatives is
at stake - I" think we should
stand up and be counted for
our people."
SHANNON WALL, president of
the National Maritime Union of
America, issued a statement say-
ing his group will press its ac-
tion in federal court to prohibit
the closing of any PHS hospital
without specific authorization by.
Congress.
After the House vote, Sen.
AlanCranston (D-Calif.), reintro-
duced the health services bill in
the Senate, deleting the provision
for keeping Public Health Serv-
ice hospitals open.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Vol. LXXXIV, No. 7.
Thursday, September 13, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
.the University of Michigan. News phone
.764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier(cam-
pus. area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through 'Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

Gregory Le Cara's
MY M ANGODFREYI
One of the great screwball comedies of the 30's. A
depression comedy with William Powell as a rich
socialite disguised as a butler waiting on Carole
Lombard.
SHORT: The Great Bubble Conspiracy
FRIDAY: The original, uncut version of Long Day's
Journey Into Night
SAT. & SUN.: Lots of Fun: Pornogra Follies and
other Curt McDowell films and Quick Billy (Bruce
Baillie)
Cinemaguild ARCHITECTURE AUD.
Times: 7 & 9:05 Adm. $1
UAC-DAYSTAR presents.:
preseU

Couzens Film Coop Presents
A N IGHT
AT THE OPERA
with the MARX BROTHERS
Fri. & Sat.-8 & 10 p.m.
$5 for 27 movies
or 75c each
COUZENS CAFETERIA

14
Nala. Scd.
Thursday
Fri. &

Aud-

Sept. 15&16

ONLY $1.00
Tickets on sale 6:00

a 9:30 sat. a& SUN

I

, Sept. 20-CAT BALLOU 75c
Sat., Sept. 21 & 22-2001

WE

INVITE,

You

EVERY FRIDAY NOON
EVERY FRIDAY AT 6 P.M.
(beginning Sept. 21)
WEDNESDAY NOON
(6 weeks, begin Oct. 3)
COUNSELING
(by appointment preferred)

BUFFET LUNCHEON (40c) with Speakers
on major themes, issues
INTERNATIONAL DINNERS with
authentic nationality cooks. At cost $1.25
CONVERSATIONS on MAN-WOMAN
RELATING: Marriage, etc., inter-ethnic
problem areas. At lunch, 40c
TWO EXPERIENCED STAFF PERSONS:
Problem areas, pre-marital, marital.

11

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E
t
i
>
.;
t
Vi
4
-{
s1
s'
ry
i

StOphOn stEils
with manassas

I

for further information: Watch for Michigan Daily ads, Posters on campus, Phone
us 662-5189 or better, Come over to:
GUILD HOUSE

friday, sept.28
crisler arena-S p.m.
X4.00 advance

in concert

802 MONROE (across from law school)

Dial
662.
626
231
S.
Stat
K

NOW SHOWING!
4I Open 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
Feature 15 minutes later
e"Will make you
feel good "l over"ds
T"Nt~f yp""r --SholitNBC-TV
PAA
2R~.~ Paramount ReeserL

15.00 door
Tickets in Advance: MICHIGAN UNION
11-5:30 mon.-friday (763-4553 phone)
also: South Univ. St. Discount Records and World
Headquarters Records on Maynard. Sorry, no per-
sonal checks.

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

The place to meet
interesting people
BACH CLUB
ORGANIZATIONAL
MEETING
All new students (and old ones)
re invited to come help us get
started for the Fal.
We need your help with poster-
hanging, typing, phone calling,
driving, cooking, planning, etc.
Thurs., Sept. 13, 8 p.m.
Greene Lounge,
East Quad

Figure Mates
panty stockings
do lovely things
for Miss J...
pure flattery clear
down to the demi-toe
styling. Of sheer,
fine quality nylon
with proper fit and
total comfort in
fashion shades of
suntan, beige, deep
brown, medium taupe
and medium black. . .in
one pour-on size. Only
at Jacobson's.. .and at
the value price of $1
a~6J4

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