100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 12, 1973 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, SOpte.mber 12, 1973

I HE MICHIGAN UAIL.Y

Wednesday, September 12, 1973 I HE MICHI(5AN L)AILY

.... .........

Cards
Reds

toppled
roll past

by

E

Dodgers

By The Associated Press Tony Perez popped out, Johnny
ST. LOUIS - Steve Renko and Bench was walked intentionally.
Mike Marshall combined on a six- Armbrister batted for Cesar1
hitter and Montreal rallied for four Geronimo and doubled to center d atly
runs in the seventh inning that for the game-winning runs. Joe
carried the Expos to a 4-1 victory Ferguson then mishandled Denis s
over St. Louis last night. Menke's fly to right, allowing an-
eother Cincinnati run to score.
behind the first-place Cardinals in'Tom Paciorek's two-out single in
the National League's East Divi- the seventh inning pulled the NIGHT EDITOR:
sion standings, began their rally Dodgers into a 3-3 tie. THERESA SWEDO
with Mike Jorgensen's singley Ross Grimsley, seeking his
against Alan Foster, 12-8. first victory over the Dodgers in grounder for an error, then Billy
seven starts, had retired 14 of 16 Williams scored Hooton with a
Jim Lyttle followed with an at- batters before Manny Mota dou- sacrifice fly.
tempted sacrifice that Foster let bled with two out in the seventh.
roll to the right of the mound for Paciorek blooped a single into'
a single, and Bob Bailey's single centerfield that dropped at the Phillies fly
forged a 1-1 tie. h feet of on-rushing Cesar Gero- PHILADELPHIA-The Philadel-
Bob Stinson walked, loading the: nimo. phia Phillies slammed four home
bases for Renko, 13-10,wose The Dodgers took a 1-0 lead in runs, two by Greg Luzinski, and
ground 'out scored the tie-breaker. the second on a run-scoring dou- rallied to beat the New York Mets
The Expos added two more when ble by pitcher Don Sutton, his 6-4 last night.
second baseman Ted Sizemore first extra-base hit of the year. The Phillies picked up their
threw wildly on Larry Lintz' two- Paciorek's home run in the third first run In the third on Luzin-
out grounder. made it 2-0. -- -
St. Louis scored its run in Then Ken Griffey blasted a.a '
the sixth on singles by Lou three-run homer in the fourth to 1
Brock and Ted Simmons sand give the Reds a 3-2 lead.
wiched around Sizemore's sacri- * * *
fice.
After Renko retired the first two Bucs baffleded )
batters in the eighth, he walked CHICAGO - Burt Hooton baffled "f f' ' I
Bernie Carbo and was 3-1 on Ken Pittsburgh with a four-hitter and
Reitz when Marshall came in. Randy Hundley hit a fifth-inning By JOHN
'Marshall completed the walk Whome_ run yesterday to carry the
Reitz, but fanned Jose Cruz to end Chicago Cubs to a 2-0 victory over "My major concern is depth.,
the inning. The relief ace went on the Pirates. was Coach Bo Schembechler'st i
to record his 29th save of the base-j Hundley's 10th homer of the with the season opener at Iowa o
ball, season. baseball season was a shot off Some welcome news was rec
* ** Steve Blass which curved around has not produced much of it late
CINCINNATI - Ed Armbrister the left field foul pole. Blass, 3-8, Mike Hoban, who had been hobby
drove home two runs with a pop- was making his first appearance yesterday and, according to Schen
fly double in Cincinnati's three-run since Aug. 1. . Their apparent recovery will hel
eighth inning, pacing the Reds to The Cubs also picked up their offensive line, which has been the
a 6-3 decision over the Los Angeles other run in the fifth without a o Another piece of news was th
Dodgers last night. hit. Hooton and Rick Monday Antepicofewwath
Dan Dries sen opened the Reds' walked, Don Kessinger was safe received their NCAA eligibility, a
eighth with a double and after when Maxvill f u m b 1 e d his may make the travel roster.
Al--. na . ; 4 1 ainnh ddi

ski's first homer of the game and
his 26th of the season. They
made it 4-2 in the fifth on an
RBI single by Luzinski.
Then, in the seventh, Billy Gra-
barkewitz put the Phillies in front
with a leadoff homer. Two outs
later, Luzinski slammed his 27th,
the fourth time this year he has
his two homers in a game.
Jim Lonberg earned his 13th
victory against 12 defeats while
Jerry Koosman, 12-15, took the
loss.

i

Tigers nibble
MILWAUKEE - Mickey Stanley
slugged a two-run homer with two
out in the 10th inning, lifting the
Detroit Tigers to a 4-2 victory over
the Milwaukee Brewers last night.
Stanley then provided the game-
winner with a blast into the left
field bleachers, his 16th homer of
the baseball season.
- recv-----

i
i

a Saturday
:N KAMLER
We lost a lot of fine players." This
an worry after practice yesterday,
only four days away.
eived from the offensive line, which
ly. Starting linemen Jim Coode andj
led by injuries, returned to practice'
mbechler, were going at full speed.
p to clear up the situation on the
big trouble spot this fall.
at, for the first time since freshmen
s many as three freshman gridders
ismc Llit PuriU(UUVof T d aJtir i f B I d

AP Photo
RON SANTO sends a Steve Blass pitch skyward in yesterday's
important showdown between the Cubs and the Pirates. With the
bases loaded, Santo, who is not known for his clutch performances,
flied out to end the inning. Although Blass pitched creditably,
for a change, in this outing, the Pirates could not touch Cubbie
right hander Burt Hooton and the Bucs fell to the North Siders,
2-0. The National League East race continues onward. Stay tuned
to the Daily for all the details.
B~ucks open with Soph
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ohio State football coach Woody Hayes
reiterated yesterday that sophomore quarterback Cornelius Greene
will start the season opener in place of senior signal caller Greg
Hare, who has a leg injury.
Hare, however, will dress for the game and is expected to
see some action.
CAMPUS THEATRE # 1214 S. University 0 Dial 668-6416
JOSEPH E.LEVINE ACADEMY
MKEeNs a AWARD
ENDSIKEICHOLS"WINNER
T H ULRS. rCE TURMAN DIRET
EMIKE
NICHOLS
DOUBLE JosephE.Levine presents a
FEATURE
EMike Nichol SFilm
Carnal nowledgeGRADUATE
STARTS F R IDAY
ROSS HUNTER'S Musical Production of
Music byBURT BACHARACH - Lyrcs by HALDAVID
SLWRR hAIER I"~ROSS HUNTER, Wi CHiARIES JARROTT Q -

-x A D ULT S O N
" emy~r best Film ever made. A! Goldstein
LAST
CHANCE
TO
0T
EVER {
-EE*.*

4i
A;

" ee" 4 &7 d Semi
F illsdale survives .

. 0

..-0will others?9

Almost certain to be includea is spat eno im z mt of Dueislana,
Illinois, who is backing up Keith
Johnson at that position. Right veterans.
guard Greg Boik and quick tackle Iowa returns a veteran unit that
Jim Hall have been battling for some people have picked for as
positions all fall and could easily I high as third in the Big Ten. No-
make the trip. body in the Wolverine camp is'
The defense is rapidly molding taking them lightly.
into shape. Craig Mutch is still out ---
at linebacker, but is expected back
soon. The defensive halfbacks are
anybody's guess and nobody's
worry. Whether Barry Dotzauer
and Dave Elliot, Tom Drake and
Roy Burks, or any combination
there of are the starters, the posi-
tions will be manned by seasoned

,

a

art.E OADU LTS
/PLAYBOY
ave Itlay for
oIepleasureof
1 tine foetw" *
31 1S. Judith Crist,
NEW YORK MAGAZINE

Dan Borus ----

T+E HILLSDALE College catalogue describes the four years
at the private school as "an adventure in learning and
maturity." a
Located 60 or so miles southwest of Ann Arbor, Hillsdale is
a school with a difference. Founded by Free-Will Baptists imbued
with "the rugged individualism" philosophy, the college holds
strongly to those beliefs today.
i Government, school officials will tell you, has no business
in education and the school will not accept any federal, state or
local money. This policy, in these times of shriveling dollars
and two-metal quarters, can point to the demise of a small
school.
But Hillsdale has a concept of education and that will stay
intact, even if genuine alligator waistbands have to be taken
in a notch or three.
Part of that "four year adventure" is centered at the
fieldhouse under the watchful eye of Athletic Director Frank
"Muddy" Waters. When Waters is not raising money and
doing all those things high powered athletic directors do
when they are being high powered, he coaches a football
team and at a 131-43-S clip at that.
There are no Orange Bowl bids, no Top Twenty's to worry
about, no national television, 120 grants in Hillsdale. But there
is a tradition, a kind of down home tradition.
Although only Chester Marcol has cracked his way to the
pros, the Hillsdale Chargers remain an integral part of the
pageantry that is college football.
The bits of inflation hit Hillsdale and it has hit Hillsdale
hard. "We had to change the cut of beef we usually put on
the training table," Waters explained. "There was a hell of
a lot of hamburger going around.
"Luckily schools started within three days of our open-
ing camp and the boys could eat with the rest of the stu-
dents. If camp had last any longer, I don't know how we
would have made it."
Food, of course, is not the only item which is skyrocketing
in- price, now that Phase Whatever has proven uneffective.
Transportation, equipment, repairs, and even footballs are cost-
ing schools more these days.
The question before Waters is whether or not the Hills-
dall football program can survive.
"Of course, it can," Waters retorts. "The school has a
commitment to the type of education intrinsic in football. Unlike
up there (Michigan, where the Athletic Department will see
splashes of red ink on its annual budget report for the first
time, we've been in debt ever since I can remember. We've
always had to depend upon donations and endowments.
"We do a couple Booster things with our alumni group, the
Touchdowners. You know, like raffling a football. Our alumni
support us pretty well."
Waters' selling point is his program, a program, he argues,
which is educational and disciplining. It is a program on which
he can, in the parlance of youth, rap on for a long, long time.
And unlike marry high powered mentors and men who want to
be higli powered mentors, you kind of get the feeling that
mybe Waters means it.
"There's a lot of discipline in this game. I know that
word is looked down upon by some. But I don't force people.
I say if you're gonna win you have to make sacrifices.
"The reason," speculates Waters, "and I've thought about
this some, that I've been lucky enough to win all these games
is that I love this game. And love the players who play it.
"What I ask them is to sacrifice for the team, for the
common goal. I'll bet that during the season 90 per cent of
them stay away from liquor, away from that sort of stuff. And
these are rough-tough kids.
"These aren't things I force on them, these are things they
accept. I don't have a hair rule or a dress code, either."
THIS YEAR'S disciplined Chargers took the field last weekend

Mayor League Stinding1.

A
Baltimore
Boston
Detroit
New York
Milwaukee
Cleveland

MERICAN LEAGUE
East

IZIZ

t' lY OHA2300 3: i SINTN YSi

ru~_ CINEM

w
83
79
77
72
70
64

L
59
66
69
73
74
84

Pet.
.585
.545
.527
.497
.486
.432
.580
.545
.500
.486
.464
.352

GB
51/
8
12z
14
22
5
13
16 2
32' 2

- -----,

Oakland
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota
California
Texas

West
831 60
78 65
72 72
69 73
65 75
50 92

I

'I

Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 8, Boston 3
Cleveland 7, New York 3
Detroit 4, Milwaukee 2, 10 innings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

w L
St. Louis 72 72
Pittsburgh 70 71
Montreal 70 73
Chicago 69 74
New York 69 75
Philadelphia 65 79
West
Cincinnati 88 57
Los Angeles 84 61
San Francisco 80 62
Houston 73 73
Atlanta 70 76
SantDiego 53 90
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 2, Pittsburgh 0
Philadelphia 6, New York 4
Cincinnati 6, Los Angeles 3
Montreal 4, St. Louis 1

Pet.
.500
.496
.490
.483
.479
.451
.607
.579
.563
.500
.479
.371

GB
1%
1 r'z
1
3
7
4
61Az
18f
34

I

UAC-DAYSTAR
Stephen
stills
and
manassas
f riday
sept.28
crisler arena
IN.O

Attention all students and
faculty: Communiy Bank has a
free checking account for you.
all the details.
Go ahead. Tear our heart out. We 1. Our Drive-in offices are open 9
love students and faculty and we 'til 9 Monday thru Saturday (or
have more great services to prove it. you can do it by mail).
We think it's tough enough to study 2. We pay 7%/% on $1,000 (4-year)
and teach without learning banking, time certificates.
too. 3. Anyone with a $300 savings
That's why we've made it all so account gets our free checking, too.
easy. You can bank with us most 4 And many N
anyol'time and we'll give you more un-banker
anyunb nk r; e time

r
P

-I

- - no.5 A% -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan