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September 09, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, September 9, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

inst

blues

festival

By HARRY HAMMITT
The audience at Friday night's
session of the Ann Arbor Blues
and Jazz Festival didn't know
quite what to expect from Count
Basie. Some had even compared
him to Lawrence Welk.
But Basie took firm control
over the listeners, playing a fine
set of jumping swing music that
added an entirely new dimension
to a concert whose last two acts
stood out as the highlights.
Though the evening became te-
dious at times, the overall qual-
ity of the music was good, and
the sounds ranged over an ex-
cellent spectrum of styles.
Yet, Leon Thomas and Fred-
die King outshown the other acts.
Vocalist Thomas played a relax-
ed and varied set which dis-
played high light-handed, inven-
tive piano style. Although he has
a unique vocal style, he sang
some good but typical blues -
a mild surprise.
Thomas showed the influence of
Coltrane and Pharoah Sanders
by playing some soothing and de-
licate jazz.
He's a master at manipulating
his voice, often using his own
brand of yodeling. Coupled with
the use of exotic percussion in-
struments, Thomas' vocals gave
the performance an interesting
and almost spiritual quality.
Freddie King proved to be a
good choice for the show's clos-
ing act. He plays hard-edged
blues, which have been somewhat
commercialized under the reeet
tutelage of Leon Russell. So
King knows how to handle a
youthful audience and really get
them jumping.
King's band appeared first and
broke into an intro as King him-
self came onstage and tore into
his guitar. He opened with "Have
You Ever Loved a Woman," let-
ting loose with a series of sting-
ing leads. He followed with a
number of uptempo blues songs,
including a partially solo per-
formance of "Sweet Home Chi-
cago."
During the set King exhibited
great mastery of the blues gui-
tar and even threw in s o m a

tricks such as playing the gui-
tar behind his back.
He ended his set with "Goin
Down," and the crowd w nt
wild. They dmanded an encore
and got it. King returned to
play "Woman Across the River,'
the title song from his latest al-
bum. Then he began to diddle
around on the guitar, building
up tension, and finally breaking
into a really rocking version of
his instrumental "lideawovi
As he left the stage, the crowd

still begged for more, but the
show ended at curfew time.
Roosevelt Sykes, who opened
the show, had had a difficult
time trying to get the crowd mov-
ing early in the evening. The
ancient pianist from New Or-
leans, playing in barrelhouse
style, seemed to lack the energy
needed to turn the crowd on.
Bugs in the sound system didn't
help.
Sykes did, however, play a
pleasant set featuring his big-

gest hit, "Drivin' the Wheel,"
and other numbers such as "The
Night Time Is the Right Time."
Local talent made a good
showing Friday night as Ann
Arbor's Mojo Boogie Band played
a short but varied set of blues
numbers. The band w a s tight
and controlled, featuring some
good vocals, harmonica, and gui-
tar from Hawg Tate, and some
excellent sax from Scott Mc-
Kay.
The band has been disappoint-

ing in
worked
class.

the past, but have now
themselves up to first-

On the other hand, the Revo-
lutionary Art Ensemble o n I v
got things into gear when the
drummer dominated some strict-
ly rhythmic playing, creating a
solid but varied rhythmic base.
Despite the tedious moments,
the festival's opening night pro-
vided an excellent and exciting
variety of musical styles.

NEW WO RL D FILM Cr0.P-presents-| |

.rr

* A

SNUR T V N{NEGUT'S *
r USE FIVE

w 7: tW (-nHs tm - vaiJv Pr'4izKind award. "One of the
1m(3. {arin.. rii i n toln fa-scinating pictures ever made.'
-Rex Reed
SHORT: Lenny rucc in THANK YOU MASK MAN, the erotic,
ans a n1 t 2 :> C kanger and his close, close
TUES., WED., & THURS. ONLY
ept. 11( 12, & 13
7:30 and 9:45 P.M. (Tus.-Noturol Science Aud.,
Wed. & Thns.--Modern Lanuoanes Aud. 3)
Pleamf- niak I ht!,ie correvtisn on your Nix World Schedule-Billy Jack
foranst replaces ral erry m n - n you.

This bizarre rendition of the Lewis Carroll classic, patterned after the -
Tenniel drawings, features such intriguing casting as Gary Cooper as
The White Knight, Cary Grant as the Mock Turtle, Edward Everett
Horton as the Mad Hatter, and Jack Oakie and Rosco Karns as Tweedle-
dum and Tweedledee. W.C. Fields plays Humpty-Dumpty, and delivers
superb in-character readings of author's nonsense verse.
WED. & THURS. ONLY, Sept. 12 & 13
7:30 and 9:45 P.M.
(Wed.-Natural Science Aud., Thurs.-Modern Languages Add.)
ALICE can be seen as a double-feature with SLAUGHTERHOUSE
FIVE at the usual 50c discount.
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
NEXT WEEK DON'T MISS
SATYRICON & BILLY JACK
replaces the Conformist, Play It As It Lays replaces Billy Jack, The Con-

Daily Photo by KAGAN

Roosevelt Sykes

to

C

6:00 2 Movie
"The Yearling." (1946)
7 Movie
"TheLone Ranger and tow
Lost City of Gold." (1950)
9 Tom Jones-Variety
50 Star Trek
k:30 4 News
1:00 4 George Pierrot
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 Hee Haw
56 Cen Showcase
7:30 4 World of Disney
7 Half the George Kirby
Comedy Hour
9 Bewitched
56 Jazz Set
8:00 21*A*S*H
7 Jacques Cousteau
9 Untamed World
50 Real World of Make Believe
56 The Outsiders
8:30 2 Pro Football
4 McMillan and Wife
9 All Around the Circle
89:00 7 Movie
"El Dorado," (1967)
56 Masterpiece Theatre
50 To Be Announced
10:00 4 Escape
9 VD Blues-Report
56 Firing Line
50 Lou Gordon
10:30 4 Profiles in Black
11:00 4 News
9 CBC News
11:15 9 Religious Scope
11:30 2 7 News
4 Big Valley
9 Movie-Drama
"To Kill a Mockingbird." (1962)
12:00 2 Name of the Game
7 ABC News
50 The Joy of Living
12:15 7 Movie
"Executive Suite," (1954)
12:30 4 News
2:00 2 Wagon Train
2:15 7 News
3:30 2 News
MONDAY
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Andy Griffith
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Lilias, Yoga and You
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 I Dream of Jeannie
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Consumer Game

7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 Mission Impossible
56 Speaking Freely
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Hollywood Squares
7 Let's Make a Deal
9 Bewitched
8:00 2 Gunsmoke
4 Lotsa Luck-Comedy
7 Rookies
9 Irish Rovers
56 Cry Sorrow, Cry Hope-Drama
50 Night Gallery
8:30 4 Diana-Comedy
Debut: Diana Rigg
9 Greg Landry
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Here's Lucy
4 Movie
"Shoot Out" (1971)
7 Movie
"Lady in Cement" (UMS)
9 News
56 Skating Spectacular
9:30 2 Dick Van Dyke
9 Stratusfaction-Musie

10:30 9 What on Earth
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:30 2 Movie
"Reflections in a Golden Eye"
(1967)
4 Johnny Carson
7 James Garner at the
California 5'00
9 News
50 Movie
"Tonight We Raid Calais."
(1943)
12:00 9 Movie
"The River's Edge" (1957)
1:00 4 7 News
1:40 2 Movie
"Charlie Chan in Egypt" (1935)
3:10 2 News
wcbn

no

,. .

Smile while you're makin' it
Laugh while youre takin' it
Even though you're fakin' it
Nobody's gonna know... .

Friday and Saturday 7 & 1 0
Sunday, 2, 5, & 8

MONDAY

I

10:00 2 Medical Center
9 In the South Seas
Debut
50 Perry Mason
56 The Silent Years
"Blood and Sand" (1922)

7 Morning Show
9 Rock
12 Progressive
3 Folk/Rock/Progressive
6 News/Sports
6:30 Counter-orientation
7 Dialogue: Carol Jones, Jerry
DeGrieck
7:30 Jazz/Blues
11 Progressive

Two Mike Nichols Hits
Together for the first time

JOSEPH F.LEVINE
presents
LAWRENCE TURMAN
6 -O 1
JosephE.Levine presents a
Mike NichoIsFiIm
Carnal KTECHNdCOLOR ATI
TECHNICOLOR' PANAVISION'
Panavision Technicolor* LC]IAn Ave Embassy t.RI..
An Avso Embassy Pictus

At

CADMY
AWARD
WINNER
REST
DIRECTOR
MIKE
NICHOL,
1U
Idl

1"i

NOW
SHOWING
SOON: CLOCKWORK ORANGE

1214 S. University
Dial 668-6416
For Show Times

a ┬░al get 1tjb done
*T DOORS OPEN
TUES., SEPT. 11 IN CONCERT 7:30
y(, F D HE IN
* AND
MUSKADINE BLUES BAND*
AND
RADIO KING

Al
fo
m1

The words are from 0 LUCKY The smile belongs to Malcolm is director Lindsay Anderson. He
AN! Alan Price wrote the songs i()OW('lI. 1From 'If . . . to 'A makes a movie every five years.
or this new imovieabout 'a p'Ol!I , Xek 4ork Orange' lie's been right You don't forget them.
a'sehOt iget. i g hi attitude. Right 'This Sporting Life' started it,
s rercifor the tiisg vtr oiet Ues got lots of reasons 'If . . .' was a timely explosion.

,

1..

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