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January 21, 1975 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-21

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Tuesday, January 21, 1975,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Gophers
as cager

prove
fall,

too

tall,

67-58

By JEFF SCHILLER ::;. :::: .::.....i...... .... .....
Special To The Daily
MINNEAPOLIS - The Michi-
gan basketball team learned
last night that a good little man
is no match for a good big man P o *ts
as the Wolverines were beatenN
by Minnesota's towering Goph- NIGHT EDITORS
ers, 67-58, in front of 17,565 BRIAN DEMING
w i 1 d 1 y enthusiastic Gopher BILL STIEG
partisans. ... .....................
Wolverine coach Johnny Orr lineups, Minnesota is the
had nothing but praise for the league's slowest squad.
desire exhibited by his small, Prior to the game, Michigan#
scrappy Wolverine squad and assistant coach Jim Dutcher
harsh words for the officiating. identified what the Wolverines
"We came after them real thought would be the determin-
well. We've never played ing factor in the game's out-
against a team that was so come.
physically overpowering, and "If we can rebound with them
they were helped by some on the defensive boards,"
shaky calls. It's tough to win Dutcher commented, "We stand
when they don't call some on an excellent chance of beating
them (Minn.esota). them. Getting the ball off the
"But I was really proud of boards will mean that we can
our kids. They battled all the activate our fast break and uti-
way and never gave up. We lize our speed advantage."
were moving with four and a But no board strength wouldI
half minutes to go when (Mike) have contained Gopher Mark
Thompson goal-tended for them Landsberger. The 6-8 sopho-
and it wasn't called. And that more poured in 15 of 21 from
killed the momentum. the field and upset the most
"We just got too far behind." carefully laid of Wolverine de-
The game shaped up from fensive plans.
the beginning as a battle be- And rebounding was another
tween size and quickness. key factor in helping the Goph-
Coach Bill Musselman's Golden ers to a 32-23 halftime lead and
Gophers started four players keeping them ahead. Time and
6-8 or bigger, in marked con- again Minnesota was able to
trast to the Wolverines who take two or three shots during a
started a quintet which includes single possession. This,scoupled
only two players taller than 6-2. with Minnesota's .612 shooting
But whereas Michigan sports percentage meant Musselman's
one of the Big Ten's fastest aggregation was able to score
virtually every time down the
court.
Actually, the first half was
an evenly played contest for 17
of 20 minutes. Minnesota's nine-
point margin was derived from
six th a three minute stretch midway
in the period where the Gonh-
ers reeled off ten consecutive

Wolverines.
Michigan was unable to mount
a serious threat at anytime in
the second half. Minnesota was
helped by several calls that had
Orr and his substitute players
off the bench, but it's doubtful
that the Wolverines could have
triumphed in any event.
"We didn't really get going
until there were eight minutes
to go in the game," Orr com-
mented. "We got conservative
in the first few minutes, and
they got inside for key buckets.
That Landsberger really shot
well."

The one bright spot for Mich-;
igan was the improved play of
the cagers' top reserves. Guard
Lloyd Schinnerer and fresh-1
man forward Joel Thomson con-{
tributed capable performances,
but the overmatched Wolver-
ines were unable- to use their
efforts to the fullest extent.
The Wolverines 10-4 overall,
3-3 in the Big Ten, now return
home for two relative "breath-
ers" against Z4orthwestern and
Wisconsin before invading Hoos-
ier country for crucial games
against Purdue and Indiana.

I
j
I
i

Indiana wins ag ain;
Iowa slips by MSU
By The Associated Press night to lead Ohio State to a
MADISON - Quinn Buckner 77-67 victory over Northwestern.
poured in 26 points, leading top- The triumph was the fourth
ranked Indiana to an 89-69 Big straight in the Big Ten for the;
Ten basketball victory over Wis- Buckeyes who saw a 12-point:
consin last night. lead in the first half melt to a
Indiana's quickness and big 33-31 margin at intermission.
front wall, headed by 6-foot-11 But the Buckeyes, with Larry
Kent Benson, proved too much Bolden and Andreas hitting con-
for the shorter Badgers as the sistently, took charge in the
Hoosiers took their 20th con- second half and moved to a 68-
secutive victory. 49 lead before coasting in.
Wisconsin stayed within three Craig Taylor finished with 17,
points before Indiana pulled points for the Buckeyes who
ahead to a 45-29 halftime lead. are now 4-2 in the Big Ten and:
Buckner paced the Hoosiers 110-6 overall. Bolden had 12.
in the first half, hitting on seven I points, all in the second half.

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AP Photo
LITTLE JOE JOHNSON flys to the hoop for a Wolverine basket while Minnesota's Phil
"Flip" Saunders watches closely. Johnson finished with 12 points in Michigan's third Big
Ten loss.
AFTER SPLIT WITH WISCONSIN:

field goals while the team con-
verted 64 per cent from the
field to Wisconsin's 33 per cent. S1
Wisconsin, playing without in-
jured captain Dale Koehler,

CORES '

Skaters

settled

0
In

By DAVE WIHAK robbed their chances for vic-
Michigan maintained its hold tory in Friday night's game.
on sixth place in the Western Wisconsin won 3-1 in a game
Collegiate Hockey Association that could have gone either
standings by gaining a split way, as the Wolverines missed
with the Wisconsin Badgers in several golden opportunities in
last. weekend's series at Madi- the dying minutes of the game.I
son. DURING THE last five min-I
Coach Dan Farrell said he utes of the'third period, the Wol-
was satisfied with his team's verines had the Wisconsin
play, but added "With a little crowd on the edge of their
luck we could have won both seats, as they buzzed all around
games." the Badger net.
FARRELL also emphasized First, Dan Hoene had an
that his team has to be think- empty net staring him in the,
ing about earning a home ice face, and he responded by bang-
advantage for the playoffs in ing the puck off the post. The
the next few weeks. "We feel rebound then rolled to Badger1
it's very possible for us to fin- goalie Mike Dibble.
ish among the top four teams With about three minutes
when this season is over, and left, Angie Moretto was set up'
we'll be aiming for that from by Randy Neal, as he deflected
here on in." the puck towards the goal. Dib-
Against Wisconsin the Wolver- ble never saw the puck, but it,
ines played with this idea in hit him in the stomach, and he
mind, but some bad breaks smothered the rebound. As Mo-;

STANFORD STUNS FAV(

Pac-8 i
By RICH LERNER
The Pacific-Eight conference
basketball race is in a tizzy.
Over the weekend, Stanford:
bucked the oddsmakers by beat-
ing both UCLA and USC on suc-
cessive nights to cause a five-
team bottleneck at the top of
the league standings. USC,
ULCA, Stanford, Oregon and
Oregon State are all lumped
together with 3-1 slates.
Stanford is the surprise of
the bunch. The Cardinals were
expected to be strong, but
barely muddled .through a
non-conference schedule with
five victories against the same
number of defeats.
"We really didn't do any-
thing different," said Stanford
coach Howie Dallmar of the
wins. "We got outstanding per-
formances from Rich Kelley and
Ed Schweitzer."
Kelley, a seven foot tall sen-
ior, scored 22 points and en-
snared 13 rebounds against
UCLA Friday night, and re-!
turned Saturday to tally 30
against USC. Schweitzer scored
22 against the Bruins and 19
versus the Trojans.
"The job was 'done on the
boards; that's wlere we hal to
do it," said Dallmar.
Against UCLA we led by 13,
at the half, and at one point.
15, but they hit for nine
straight points . in the second
half. Richard Washington and
Marques Johnson had the hot
hands for them."
"It's very difficult to play
those teams back-to-back," Dall-
mar continued, "USC is as
good as UCLA, but UCLA has
tradition which brings out an

ace ot
emotional performance from thet
team.t
"The win Saturday was justt
as important."
Stanford has an experienced
team, will all five starters being
two-year veterans. The 6-8'
Schweitzer and 6-6 Scott Trobee
man the forward positions.
Schweitzer shoots 76 per cent
from the floor in conference
play.
Guards are, 6-3 playmaker
Mel Arterberry and Mark Gil-
berg.
The real star in the Stan-c
ford constellation is pivotmanI
Kelley. Dallman, in his 21stY
year of coaching at Palo Alto,c
is enthusiastic about the big
man's play.-
"He's definitely an All-Ameri-
can candidate. He's aggressive,t
not intimidating, very fluid and
plays facing the basket much
like Tom McMillen (formerly)
of Maryland.
"Kelley's only problem is that'
he gets into foul trouble fre-
quently," said Dallmar.
Kelley, averaging 23 points a'
game in league play, held
UCLA's highly-touted Ralph
Drollinger to only three re-r
bounds.+
The wins upped Stanford's
record to 8-6. Dallmar, however, +
claims the mark is misleading. '
"Prior to this weekend, nine
out of our last eleven games |
have been on the road, and
Arterberry was out for five
games," he explained.
UCLA coach Johnny Wooden+
was not shocked by his team's
first defeat of the season.
"I wasn't surprised we lost,'
especially on their court," said

retto later commented, Dibble tough on the Badgers Saturday
had "horseshoes the whole night. To sum up his weekend's
game." work, he saved 82 shots and al-
The man with the best chance lowed 3 goals in each game.
for glory was Frank Werner, as Moore was definitely a favor-
he took a shot from point blank ite with the Wisconsin crowd, as
range on the Wisconsin goal that his acrobatic flare and sensa-
seemed to have Dibble beaten. tional saves appealed to their
The puck rolled between his tastes.
legs and was halfway across the The climax to Moore's show-
goal-line before he reached manship ..involved Moore hand-
back to glove it. ing over his stick to the Wis-
THE REDlight did not go on, consin band in return for a
however, and the referree, in Badger hat after the Wolver-
an excellent position to see the I ines' 6-3 victory. The classy per-
play, signalled no goal. former promptly received a
Michigan had its chances, to loud applause from the Wiscon-
be sure, but Wisconsin's strong sin supporters.
forechecking game can't be ov- It was a fitting end to a
erlooked. The Badgers had sev- Michigan victory, in which the
eral chances to score them- Wolverines clearly dominated
selves, firing 50 shots at Robbie the Badgers. In particular, the
Moore. And yet they came away line of Kris Manery, Dave De-
with only three goals. bol and Werner were, as Far-
MOORE was brilliant in both rell put it, "simply outstand-
games, and was particularly ing." They scored four of the
six goals in the Saturday game,
l Iand were constantly forecheck-
ing theBadgers, forcing them
to make mistakes.
"WE CAME out forecheck-
tle s ing tonight, and our defense
played a tougher game," Far-
rell said. "Those were the keys
to the win.
the Wizard of Westwood. "Any One worry that arose out of
team in this year's Pac-8 could! n or htaoeoto
beat us." the series with the Badgers, but
bWth fvtsone that Farrell feels will rec-
With five teams tied atop tify itself, is the fact that lead-
the loop standings, the race is ing scorer Angie Moretto was
wide open; however, Dallmar shut out.
tabs USC and UCLA as the shut out.
teams to beat. Any team in However, the victory may
the confere e is definitely a prove that other players are
threat, as 6nly six starters capable of picking up the scor-
graduated from last year's ing slack, making for a more
Pac-8 teams. Graduates in. balanced attack. Moretto has
cluded Bill Walton, Keith averaged almost 2 points a
Wilkes and Greg Lee. game, and it will be difficult
Stanford tied UCLA for the for Minnesota to hold him score-
conference crown in 1963, and less.
last won the championship out-
right in 1942 when it went on to
capture the NCAA title.
"Our wins gave the whole
conference a lift," Dallmar said. 4World Airways
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C - andsucces

Bri tt
Robinson
Koipec
Crote
" Johnson
Schinnerer
White
Thompson
Baxter
Team
Totals
La ndsberger
Olberding
Thompson
Winey
Saunders
Sims
Shaffer
Nelson
Team
Totals
Halftime a
Michigan 23.
A--27,565

MICHIGAN
FG FT R F
6-14 0-2 2 5
3-6 0-0 2 3
6-11 1-1 2 3
4-9 0-0 3 4
6-14 0-1 0 3
1-1 0-0 1 0
0-0h 0-0 1 0
1-1 0-0 4 1
1-1 1-2 1 2
8
28-57 2-6 24 21
HINNESOTA
FG FT R F
15-21 1-2 8 1
8-11 0-0 5 2
4-8 4-6 8 3
0-1 0-0 0 0
2-4 0-1 1 4
1-2 2-2 2 5
0-2 0-0 2 1
0-0 0-0 0 0
6
30-49 7-11 32 16
score: Minnesota

points.
Minnesota stepped up the
pace in the second half. The
Gorhers were torrid from the
field and were aided and ab-
betted by many mistakes
committed by the frustrated

Sad ticking

o Cats trounced
7 EVANSTON, Ill. - Bill An-
32' dreas, the Big Ten's leading
scorer, hit for 25 points last

TP
12
13
S
12
z
0
2
3
58
TP
31
16
12
0
4
4
0

E

I -

couldn't get closer than 13 points College Basketball
in the second half. Kentucky,
ndaa8, Wisconsin 69
* Tennessee 65, Vanderbilt 61
SSpartans bounced Notre Dame 96, Holy Cross 91
Minnesota 67, MICHIGAN 58
IOWA CITY - Forward Dan Iowa 83, Michigan State 79
Frost scored 21 points and led Ohio State 77, Northwestern 67
a second half rally last night NFC 17, AFC Pro Bowl
that gave Iowa a 83-79 Big Ten N , 10
Conference basketball victory
over Michigan State.
Five Iowa players scored in ,A RKE
double figures to snap the
Hawkeyes' four game losing
fstreak. V HV tn -p
Iowa trailed 40-29 at halftime j I$10 plus parts
bit shooting by Frost, who pick-
ed in 12 rebounds, and Larry 8-6 Mon.-Fri.
Parker who added 16, helped: 13 OSW O
Iowa s<rore 54 points in the sec- 1237 ROSEWOOD
and half. 662-2576
Michigan State's Lindsay Hair-
ston led all scorers with 25 between S Industrial &s
noints and William Glover add- Packard
ed 22 for the Spartans.
The victory gives Iowa a 6-9
season record and 3-4 in the
Big Ten. Michigan State now is1
2-4 in conference play and 8-6
overall. IT'S NOT

TOO LATE'I

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Where Did The a Goo
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