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January 21, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-21

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Tuesday, Jdriutary 21, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Tuesday, January 21, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

8~"' SO O vC 1
stropo i
By DXVID BURHENN After intermission, Oliver Messiaen's "Long- :
Soviet cell st Mstislaiv R strapovi .h is not i 1g for th° Eternity of Jesus" was performed
known to possess any spe ial magical powers. in place of a Leonard Bernstein selec tin from
But his brilliant recital Sunday afterno:i 'Mass."
at Hill Auditorium held 4000 persons spellbounid The Messiaen was nicely done, most of it in
with a display of dazling technique and super the instrument's upper-register. The mystic
musicality. qualities of the composition were brought out in
The program of Bach, Chopin Brahms, Mes- Rostropovitch's clean tone and attention to the
siaen, and Shostakovitch was pleasingly diverse, color of he work.
and offered a wide-angle view of Rostropovich's The afternoon's showpiece was a breathtak-
considerable talent. ing performiance of Dmitri Shostakovitch's Son-
The artist, ably accompanied by nianist Sam- ata in D Minor, Op. 40.
ual Sanders, began the recital with a short The sonata, a romantic work written during
Bach adagio. From the start, Rotsropovich fil- the composer's early period is one of drama-
led the hugh hall with his tone. That sound, con- tically opposed mood and color.
tered, full, and yet precise, did not lose its The second movement was especially fun for
intensity in pianissimo passages. bot artist and audience alike. Rostropovich
Rostropovich dedicated the Chopin Etude No. launched into a series of barbarous repetitive
7 to the memory of the late conductor Thor figures with abandon, as the movement opened.
Johnson, with whom the cellist had appeared The artist dealt with the enormous technical
before. The memorial was beautifully apt, an demands of the sonata without problem, and
elegaic work with alyrical character. intonation was consistently accurate.
Rostropovich then leaped into the Brahms' Rostropovich drew his bow off the strings like
Sonata in F Major, Op. 99. "Leaped" is a good a calvary colonel unsheathing his sabre when
description of the dramatic way in which the the work ended, and the audience jumped to
work was approached. The scene of 1_fe and their feet in a thunderous standing ovation.
spirit in this sonata, considered a capstone of Rostropovich and Sanders were not allowed
the cello literature, was well expressed in Ros- to rest until two encores were performed. The
tropovich's interpretation. second work, David Popper's "Elves Dance,'
The second movement was particu-xarly me- is a work of little artistic value, but amaz-
morable. Sanders was attentive to the fluid ing technical difficulty. A faultless perfornance
give-and-take of the Brahms, and the enoemble of this little encore brought a marvelous recital
between cello and piano was superb. to a stunning conclusion.

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D~ailv Photo by IKAREN K.AMAUSKI
Mstislac Rosiropouwich

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Jazzmusicians play

in

faculty concert

By BOB TAUB
They sit at the piano, work-
ing on a new line, and groov-
ing on it - one starts something
on the piano, with the other
coming in on trumpet. It's start-
ing to happen - its jazz.
It will all come together Sun-
day at Rackham when jazzmen
Louis Smith, Robert Elliot, Ron-
ald Brooks, and Carl Alexius
will present "Five Jazz Clas-
sics". The free performance,
part of the Faculty Chamber
Series, should offer some seri-
ous, emotional statements from
men who make music their
lives.
Alexius, who keeps body and
so'il together teaching classi,
cal composition for the School
of Music, becomes animated
when talk turns to jazz, "It's
emotion, pure and simple -
we're jist going to get up
there and play -- we don't know
how it's going to sound, but it
is going to be a direct reflec-
tion of wher ever our heads
and hearts are at the moment."
Louis Smith, relaxed and pos-
sibly grooving on some new
melody cooking in his head,
chides in, "They call it be-
bop - the jazz of the 50's and
60's - Miles Davis before he'
went electric, John Coltrane,

Charlie Parker. It's music with
all the stops pulled out - you
go out there and stretch a
chord as far as it will go. And
then if you're John Coltrane,
you keep on going . ."
Bob Elliot is a big man, very
serious. When he talks about his
music he avoids the cliches, he
avoids what you might want
him to say. He doesn't rattle
off the usual names, many of
the jazz cats he has played
with he knows you probably
haven't heard of. "I don't go
and say Miles Davis is the best
trumpeter around. What does
that mean?" There is a trace
of impatience in his voice. "I've
seen Miles in Detroit when he
ws just awful - I mean aw-
Elliot shifts, turns, he finds
it hard to put something like
jazz into pat words, narrow
definitions. "You see," he tries
to explain, "I don't call music
bad or good, I just say whether
I liked it or not, I mean jazz
is where you are at at the giv-
en moment. It's not what you
did last year in the studio . .."
Alexius responds to a ques-
tion on electrics and rock in
today's jazz with a dismissing
sweep of the hand, "Some so-
called jazz groups are just hand-

ig their audiences so much
crup--so much superficial emo-
tion. The kids want to get riled
up so they rile them up. Vol-
ume doesn't create emotion,
doesn't create something real-
it's there or it isn't."
Elliot wants to talk about the
volume thing too. "You know,
nothing can quite muddy up a
rhythm section like an electric
instrument, you just don't get
the precise note, you get a
heavy, longer sound out of it.
Volume can be distortion." El-
liot admits to playing electric
bass at certain gigs, but claims
only because he doesn't have
the "strength in his hands" 'to
play the acoustic, standup va-
riety.

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Daily Photo by KEN FINK
Carl Alexius, Bob Elliot (nd Louis Smith (l. to r.)
lCons tadt coldbe last UAC
concert at HlAuiorium

The gentlemen rambled on a
bit - memories of boredom on
the road, playing junk music at
nightclub dives, cutting ses-
sions with the greats like
Chambers, Blakey, Silvers, and
other names that never made it
out of the self-enclosed world
of a smoke-filled club. They're
glad they can still play, they
have steady jobs paying the
bills, so they can do what real-
ly counts - make the music.
They politely beg off questions,
they want to get back to that
pianohand work on that line
they had going...

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Jan. 24, 25

TONIGHT!
LINDA RONSTADT
HILL AUD.-8 P.M.
RESERVED SEATS $4-5-6
AND PLEASE: Remember to observe the
no smoking" signs.
FREE MOVIE!
"JAMAICA HOLIDAY"
THURS., JAN. 23-8 p.m
Michigan Unison Assembly Hall
sponsored by UAC TRAVEL
MEDIATRICS presents
HAROLD &MAUDE

rurri s ei ww i

7, 8:45, and 10 p.m.

By IRA MONDRY
Those buying tickets for to-
night's Linda Ronstadt concert
are requested by UAC-Concert
Coop not to smoke, drink alco-
holic beverages, or vomit on the
seats in Hill Auditorium.
A sign displayed at the tic-
ket, counter in the Union tells
patrons, that due to past abuses
in the Auditorium Linda Ron-
stadt may well be the last
popular singer to grace the
stage at Hill.
The University has agreed

to this contract solely on the
faith that the audience could;
be brought to understand their
responsibility as concert goers,
and not ruim the 60 year old
structure.
UAC - Concert Coop is ask-
ing people who cannot abide by
these regulations not to buy tic-
kets. They are willing to lose
revenue now, and preserve the
auditorium, and their relation
with the University, for future
concerts.
A major effect of the situa-

tion has been to narrow down
the choice of possible concerts.
The only concert which UAC-
Concert Coop, produced in Hill
during the fall semester was
Souther, Hillman, and Furay
with David Bromberg, unsuc-
cessful financially and, by most
accounts, artistically as well.
Several future shows are in
the serious negotiation stage,
including Jackson Browne and
Maria Muldaur. However, these
negotiations cannot proceed un-
til after the Ronstadt concert
has proved a success as regards
violitions of the buidling.
The Ronstadt concert is im-
portant in this sense, but it is
not a test case. If future shows
are booked into Hill, the re-
sponsibility of audiences will
be an ongoing process.
Authorities both at the Uni-
versity and the Concert Coop
realize that only a small mi-
nority are violating the regula-
tions. This does not change the
situation, however, and the fate
of Hill is in the entire audi-
ence's hands.
Tickets are still available at
the Union box office and at Hill
Aud. prior to the concert.
21 st, 22nd, 23rd
IMIXED LEAGUESI
! LAST CALL I

Michigan Daily

, I

UNIVERSITY THEATRE SHOWCASE
37''
INSP'ECTOR
11 HOUND '
A PLAY BY TOM STOPPARD
JANUARY 19 211915
/ ARENA THEATRE '
TICKET INFORMATION
CALL:764-0450
A WEDNESDAY SHOW
ADDED, JAN. 22
8 P.M

1

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STILL ONLY $1
UAC TRAVEL presents
JAMAICA
MARCH 1-8
DEADLINE TO SIGN-UP: JAN. 24
SKI UTAH
MARCH 1-8
DEADLINE TO SIGN-UP: FEB. 5
Also, student flights to New York, L.A., San
Francisco and Dallas during Spring Break.
Special rates on all flights
Call the UAC Travel Office (763-2147)
for more info.
FUTURE WORLDS presents
AL LITHMAN
"Auroville," an evolving alternative future
Next MON., JAN. 27 Hill Aud.
Sign-up for the Future Worlds course at the
Geog. Dept.

French Pianist PASCAL ROGE
Detroit Debut of 23-Year-Old Star
in Program of LISZT and RAVEL
THE DETROIT INSTITUTE OF ARTS
Founders Concert Series: Edith J. Freeman, Chairman
AUDITORIUM, FRI., JAN. 24, 8:30 P.M.
Art institute Ticket Office (832-2730),
All Hudson's $6, $5. $4

ann
arbor aud. a, angel hal
fil
............ ".... "...{.::: .... .....;.. :.. ..... :?''. i.. f":a :j{:Y :a.ll
co-op.'~i
$''x~ ..;"'7.>'}

Linda I

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Sign Up Now
Ron. lac t UNION LANES
CENTER FOR THE COORDINATION
OF ANCIENT AND MODERN STUDIES,
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM,
THE RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE
PRESENT
The Marionette Theatre
OF

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