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January 09, 1975 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, January 9, 1975
Sports of The Daily
Winter Roundup
Wrestling
A BRUISED but determined Michigan wrestling squad takes
on Yankee Conference champion Rhode Island tonight at
Crisler Arena in the winter term wrestling opener.
"Rhode Island has a lot of New York wrestlers," says
Michigan coach Bill Johannesen, "and New York is one of the
toughest recruiting areas in the country, so their wrestlers
should be good.
"I think our experience against tougher competition will
give us the edge in the meet," Johannesen continued, "but there
should be some good individual matches."
The Wolverines can boost their dual meet record to 5-2
with a win. They have some momentum, coming off a 23-9
win on January 3 over Ohio University, and a 27-9 victory
over Ohio State the next day that. evened Michigan's Big 10
mark at 1-1.
However, the squad is racked with injuries. Team captain
Dave Curby, defending Big 10 champion at 190 pounds, suffered a
houlder injury in the Midlands holiday tournament in Evanston,
11. and will miss tonight's meet. 177-pounder Mark Johnson will
eplace him.
Both 134-pounder Brad McCrory (knee) and 167-pounder Dan
Brink (ribs) missed action in Ohio but will wrestle tonight.
Injuries weren't the only factor trimming the Michigan
ineup. Freshman Greg Haynes, the starter at 118 pounds, is
academically ineligible for this term and will be replaced by
another freshman, Todd Schneider.
Transfer student Robert Demember from Schoolcraft College
'will get a shot at the 118-pound spot when he gets in shape,
Johannesen said.
Two-timhe All-American Jim Brown remains the only
undefeated Wolverine, despite a minor knee injury, and
repeated his 1972 feat of capturing the 118-pound class at the
Midlands.
Bill Schuck, fourth at 142 pounds, was the only other
Wolverine to place in a tournament which clearly showed that,
for now at least, Iowa has far and away the best team in the
country.
Freshman Rich Lubell made an impressive showing, including
an upset decision over All-American Dan Mallinger (formerly of
Iowa State), a 3-2 loss to eventual winner Tim Cysewski of Iowa,
and a 1-1 tie with 1974 NCAA 126-lb. runnerup Billy Martin which
was decided by a referee's decision.
-RICK BONINO
ockey
AFTER A SPLIT last weekend against Notre Dame the
Michigan hockey team finds itself in sixth place in the
CHA with an 8-8 record. The dekers beat the Irish 7-4 last
riday but dropped Saturday's contest 7-4. This weekend the
olverines travel to Houghton to face Michigan Tech.
Just before vacation the Wolverines were bombed by Michigan
tate twice by the scores of 6-1 and 8-3 in goalie Robbie Moore's
ebut after recovery from a knee injury.
Michigan also competed in the Great Lakes Invitational
Hockey Tournament held at Olympia Stadium in Detroit
December 27 and 28. A goal by sophomore Kris Manery gave
Michigan a 3-2 win over previously undefeated Harvard and
a chance to meet Michigan Tech in the finals.
The Wolverines however had to settle for the runnerup spot
s Tech came up with three goals in the, last six minutes to win
-2. Michigan placed three men on the Tournament all-star team-
efenseman Greg Natale, center Angie Moretto and Moore.
oore was tabbed Most Valuable Player for the tourney.
BRIAN DEMING
0j
wimining
HE MICHIGAN swim team faces its stiffest challenge of the
young season Friday night, when it entertains powerful
isconsin at 7:30 p.m. in Matt Mann Pool.
The Wolverines, who ran their record to 3-0 with a 72-43
trouncing of Princeton on December 14, used the Christmas
reak to drill intensely for the Badgers, who may very well give
he Blue more than they can handle.
Last year, the Badgers clipped the Blue swimmers 70-53.

iHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

TOO TIRED FOR INDIANA

Blue
By BILL STIEG
After three exhausting Big
Ten games in five days, the
Michigan basketball team 'wNk
Tuesday off, and yesterday
started preparing for Saturday's
game with Michigan State at
East Lansing.
The Wolverines emerged from
the long weekend's flurry of'
games with a pair of wins and
one loss, Monday night, to
number-one Indiana. As Michi-
gan's strength ebbed, so did its
c h a n c e s of upsetting the
Hoosiers.
"We were dead tired out
there," moaned head coach
Johnny Orr after the 90-76
defeat. "C.J. (Kupec) said he
was so tired, he was dizzy."
The source of the trouble was
in the Big Ten's new "double
round-robin" schedule, which
pits each team against every
other team twice. The added
games mean six teams had the
same exhausting start as Mich-
igan. Indiana did not.
The Hoosiers were coming off
a 107-55 win over Michigan
State's jayvees, who played be-
cause the Spartan varsity was
Big Ten
Standings
Teams W Li
Minnesota 3 0I
Indiana 2 01
MICHIGAN 2 1
Purdue 2 1
Iowa 2 1
Northwestern 1 1
Illinois 1 2
Michigan State 1 2
Ohio State 0 2
Wisconsin 0 2

regroup
suspended for walking out of a Grote fou
team meeting. Indiana coach minutes l
Bobby Knight pulled his starters and forw
early in the second half. starting h
Meanwhile, Michigan w a s out in the
beating a surprisingly tough Michiga
Ohio State squad, 85-73. Two with fres
days earlier, the Wolverines playingg
needed two overtimes to top Britt, nor
Illinois, 86-84. omore Ric
But it's doubtful that even Joel Thom
a rested Michigan team could wards.
have beaten the Hoosiers last The tea
Monday. outstandin
"Indiana's as good a Big Pen had onec
team as I've seen," claimed his caree
Orr. "I didn't see anyone out 17 reboun
there who wasn't a good
shooter."
Though Michigan gave the
Crisler crowd of 13,609 some. Name
thing to scream about ;n the Kupec
Johnson
early going, the game belonged Britt
to the Hoosiers.j Grote
Indiana center Kent Benson Robinson
erased a 12-6 Wolverine lead white
with hoo d .Baxter
with two hooks and a jumper, Thompson
and five minutes later the McGhee
Hoosiers had a ten point lead schinnerer
that grew relentlessly. Midway Conston
in the second half the gap oTEAM
reached 20 points, and three
times Michigan was down by
24.S G R
Steve Green, Scott May, and
J o h n Laskowski led the
Hoosier sharpshooters with 26, Bill
20, and 19 points, respective -
ly. Overall, Indiana hit 62 per
cent of its shots.
The overtime win in Cham-
paign was very important to
the Wolverines for a couple of
reasons.
First, it gave the Blue bench
just the test it needed. Starting
guards Joe Johnson and Steve
Itry

after

loss

led out with several
eft in regulation tune,
vard John Robinson,
is first game, f ,uled'
first overtime.
n finished the game
shman Dave Lauer!
guard with WaymanI
imally a forward. Soph-
ck White and freshman
npson were at the for-I

ned several key buckets, in-
cluding the winner.
The other bonus of the game
was the play of Robins n, who
tossed in 21 points. Very tough
to stop inside, the sophomore
thrilled the crowd two days
later in Crisler when he hit 12
of 13 shots to lead Michigan
with 28 points in its win over
Ohio State.
The Indiana lass was nut too

am rallied behind the unexpected, and Orr did not see
ng play of Kupec, who it as a crushing blow by any
of the best games of means. "I think we'll bounce
r with 30 points and back," he said. "I still think
ids, and Britt, who can- we're a good basketball tea'n."
'M' basketball stats

G FG-FGA PCT FT-FTA PCT

1
11
11
11
10
11
11
11
3
3
4
2
11

72-144
54-146
62-142
48-102
38-61
30-58
13-43
12-31
2-3
2-2
1-3
0-0
334-735

.500
.370
.437
.471
.623
.517
.302
.387
.667
1.000
.333
.000
.454

36-44
49-61
15-27
30-43
22-30
11-15
8-10
4-6
2-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
177-238

.818
.803
.555
.698
.733
.733
.800
.667
1.000
.000
.744

AVG
16.4
14.3
12.6
11.5
9.8
6.5
3.1
2.5
2.0
1.3
0.5
0.0
76.8

EDUCED RA TES All Next Week
iards & Bowling at the Union
Sunday thru Saturday
OPEN 1 1 a.m.-12 mid. Mon.-Thurs.
1 1 a.m.-1 a.m. Fri. & Sat.
I p.m.-l 2 mid. Sundays
Michigan 'Union

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
Wild Wayian lofts one
SUCCESSFUL BLUE HOLIDAY:

e,'nve to'Ir

fIlrn u'SIR

cross-country

N.A ..- .. N L/ 5/ « t N1/ %. 5/ 5JF 5.'W / N V'W5X.-
By BILL STIEG :: .....: :::>slipped up and let lowly Eastern
Michigan built up momentum Ii(1-5 at the time) upset them in
for the Big Ten season by u 1lD athe first game, 62-60. The
rolling past its last five non- Hurons used a slowdown of-
conference opponents in con- fense, capped with a buzzer
vincing style, winning each shot by Ted Hipsher.
game by at least eleven points, r So the big rematch between
and claiming two straight tourn- NIGHT EDITOR. U of D and Michigan was off,
ament championships along the LEBA HERTZ and the Wolverines had to settle
v'ay fora championship win over
Rebounding from their 20- the upstart Hurons, 71-56.
point road loss to Southern that night.
Illinois, the Wolverines beat "Coming off that Southern Guard Steve Grote carried
Dayton on the Flyers' own Illinois loss, it was a great vic- away three trophies: one for
court, downed Virginia Tech tory." being named to the all-tourney
and Manhattan to win the Seventeen points from co- team one for being the out-
M i c h i g a n Invitational, and captain C. J. Kupec and 13 sntndn defensive player;band
whipped Western Michigan and rebounds from sophomore for- not tomaotone y his
Eastern Michigan in Detroit to ward Rick White pulled the Wol- Valuable Player.
win the Motor City Classic. verines slowly but surely ahead,
Head coach Johnny Orr has and aggressive defense at each
said that a loss can sometimes position produced a solid Michi- January 17-19
help a team. Apparently, such gan win. at POWER CENTER
was the case for Michigan. A week later, the Wolverines
The Maize and Blue were wr uehssa hi ih- " HN F1Y"KrRY Me
trounced, 87-67 last December gan Invitationaltourney, as they PATRICIA
11 by the Salukis of Southern routed the Virginia Tech Gob-
Illinois, and had to face Day- blers, 84-63, and beat Manhat-
ton three days later. tan for the championship, 77-66.
"We didn't know what to ex- Senior co-captain Joe Johnson
pect from our players," re- ran each team ragged with ? **#
called Orr. "But they went out some of the best play of his
and played really tough defense career. He scored 22 points;*

skiing

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Saturday morning clinics, 10 to 12 a.m.
Just call for an appointment.
FREE RENTAL... Then borrow a set of
skies, poles and boots for a full day's use,
at your own convenience.
FREE ON-SNOW CLINIC ... for
Campfitters' customers. Snow conditions
will determine date. Watch for it.
WATCH FOR ... our schedule of winter
cross-country touring trips.

REEl
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-ED LANGE

I

Bucks blast Pistons, 102-92;
eltics' Westphal halts Hawks

By The Associated Press scored nine more in the fourth
DETROIT - Bob Dandridgej last night as the Celtics downed
cored 32 points to lead four the Atlanta Hawks 104-96 for
riwaukee ,players with 20 or their eighth National Basketball
ore points last night as the Association victory in nine
ucks snapped Detroit's six- games.
ame winning streak with a 102- TeClismse hi
n s b frTh2 Celtics amissedsttheir
2 National Basketball Associa-j first 12 shots at the start of
ond victory. the second period as Atlanta
Dandridge and :Gary Brokaw, took a 28-22 lead but West-
ho came off the bench, com- phal sank the next nine Bos-
med for 30 points in the second ton points for a 31-30 advant-
eriod when the Bucks out-!ae
cored thehPistons 35-17 to coast gel
Sa 53-39 halftime lead. W e s t p h a I led the Boston,
Detroit'a539 didn't t make a it a con- scorers with 23 points while,
st until a final-quarter spurt John Havlicek had 22, Don Nl-
ulled them within seven points son 18 and Dave Cowens 17.
ith about five minutes remain-.Rookie Tom Henderson had
g. Buttthe Bucks increased 25 points and Tom Van Arsdale
ei margin en route to their had 20 for Atlanta.
rxth triumph in the last seven
arts. Boston beans
Brokaw, averaging f o u r PHILADELPHIA-Gail Good-I
points per game, finished with rich scored 10 of his 34 points
22. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar had in the final five minutes to
23 and Jim Price added 20 for spark the Los Angeles Lakers
Milwaukee. ' to a 106-98 win over the Phila-
DaveBing became the 19th delohia 76ers in a National Bas-
areer scorer in NBA history ketball Association game last
Then he hit his 10th point -nd night.
ound up with 28 for Detroit, The lead changed hands 2l
hile Bob Lanier added 22. times, but the Lakers led forI

against the Gobblers and 27 in
the Manhattan game. The 5-10
guard also gummed up the
works of the opponents' attacks
with some sticky defense, and
was unanimously selected Most
Valuable Player of the tourna-
ment.
Detroit-area basketball fans
spent the next week looking
forward to a Michigan vs.
University of Detroit show-
down in the championship
game of the Motor City Clas-
sic.
But while the Wolverines kept
to the schedule by beating West-
ern, 82-62, Dick Vitale's Titans

A NEW MUSICAL COMEDY REVUE
Words and Music by
NOEL
COWARD
ADVANCE SALES
PTP Ticket Office
Mendelssohn Lobby
764-0450

U
U

put Los Angeles ahead 92.90.
The g a m e extended the
Lakers' long-standing hex aver
Philadelphia. Los Angeles has
won 15 straight games between
the teams.
Fred Carter led the 76ers with1
26 points.

11

TWO SPECIAL COURSES:
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
"The Ethical Development of College Students"-G-350, Section 001
How does, could or should the University influence the ethical
development of students? How does ethical growth take place?

HOUSING DIVISION
IN-RESIDENCE STAFF APPLICATION
FORMS FOR 1915-6 ACADEMIC YEAR
Available Starting December 10, 1974
In Ms. Charlene Coady's Office
1500 S.A.B.
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Resident Director, Assistant Resident
Director, Resident Advisor, Resident
Fellow, Head Librarian and
Graduate Student Teaching Assistant
Advisory positions require Junior status or above for the Resident Fellows in
Residential College and the Resident Advisors positions: Graduate status
for Graduate Student Teaching Assistant in Pilot Program and the Resident
Directors position. However, qualified applicants who have Junior status or
above during the period of employment may be considered for the Resident
Director positions.
Many of these positions are available to single or married Graduate stu-
dents without children who qualify for Graduate work at the University.
Positions are also open for qualified, single undergraduates.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the Ann
Arbor Campus in good academic standing during the period of employment.
(2) Must be Junior status or above during the period of employment.
(3) Must have lived in residence halls at University level for at least one
year. (4) Must have a 2.5 grade point average at time of application.
(5) Preference is given to applicants who do not intend to carry heavy
academic schedules and who do not have rigorous outside commitments.

Does the University have an ethical viewpoint? A moral

or

akers prevail
BOSTON - Pa u 1I Westphal
escued Boston with an 11-point
urst in the second period and
SCO R E S

good oter Groorich tapped in I
a missed shot by Stu Lantz to
WCHA Standings
Team W L T Pts.
Michigan State 12 3 1 25
Colorado College 11 S 0 22
Minnesota 11 5 0 22
Wisconsin 10 6 0 20

political one? How have your values been affected by your col-
lege education thus far?
Instructor: JOHN ELLIS 764-9472 (office), 761-7713 (home)
TIME: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4-5:30 p.m.
3 credits, Room 1309 SEB
"Chicanos and U.S. Higher Education"-G-350, Section 002
Topics to be covered include: the current status of Chicanos in
higher education, a Chicano view of higher education in the
1970's, Chicano studies in the University, the Chicano college
as an alternative, the Chicano student, Chicano research in the
.~i~~t . . . . ihlthik rP~r tin n' heC i

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