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January 18, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two',

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, .January 18, 1975 1

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, January 18, 1 97~

I

CRESTWOOD STRIKE:
Court of Appeals upholdse
rling to reistate teachers

U may discontinue
Pilot Program C'mull UPCi1 W Otfi p 2eniC

T

DETROIT (UPI) - The State
Court of Appeals last night
upheld a lower court ruling re-
instating 184 fired teachers in
the Dearborn Heights Crest-
wood School District and ord-
ered them to report for work
Monday.
The appeals court also ord-
ered compulsory arbitration be-
tween the two sides in the bit-
ter dispute to begin within the
next 10 days.
IN ITS ruling, the court saidj
the Crestwood Board of Educa-
tion violated state law when it
dismissed the teachers last
month without filing formal
charges against them and pro-

viding them with a hearing. by the Wayne County Circuit
The school board "discharged Court to settle the controversy.
the striking school teachers in "The lower court here at-
a procedurally improper man- tempted in various ways to
ner," the court said. "That be- bring this dispute to a speedy
ing the case, it is clear that the teachers and the board could
teachers are entitled to be rein- conclusion so that both the
stated." teachers and the board could
The court said that although get back to their primary func-
the teachers themselves violat- tion-educating the children en-
ed the Michigan Public Employ- rolled in their schools," the
ment Relations Act which pro- court said. "Both sides to this
hibits public employes from dispute, through their intransi-
striking, they did not discontin- gence, have demonstrated to the
ue their services in the district , satisfaction of this Court that
as the board contended. to simply order the reinstate-
THE court also reprimanded ment of the fired teachers would
both sides in the dispute for not adequately resolve any of
"abuses of the judicial system" the problems underlying this
by ignoring several suggestions controversy."

.
3
r
M
F
F
l
i

Budget cuts hit 'U' programs

(Continued from Page 1)
most of the reductions would be
made by not hiring as many
new staff members.
"Any cuts in LSA will have
to be absorbed mainly by the
faculty," said Billy Frye, act-
ing LSA dean.

Frye said that all vacant fac-
ulty positions in the college will
remain frozen,-at least until the
budget cuts have been finalized
"We haven't contemplated per-
sonnel layoff=," stated Frye,:
although he reflised to rule out
such a possibility.

E
i
,.
3

M ayday appeal seen

(Continued from Page 1)
THEY ALSO believe it to be
the first time ever for dam-
ages to be awarded to persons
for 'a violation of their First
and Eighth Amendment rights
and whose claims were based
directly on the U.S. Constitu-
tion, rather than being brought
under civil rights laws.
Marnie Heyn, presently a
University student, was arrest-
ed on Tuesday, May 4, 1971,
while walking bewteen the Jus-
tice Department and the Old
Senate Office Building. She
spent 72 hours in a cell before
being freed.
"The important thing here is
not the money, but the fact that
our Constitutional guarantees
were upheld," she said after
learning of the verdict. She
termed the arrests "strictly po-
litical."
"THEY JUST overstepped
their bounds," commented Paul
Travis, a former University
student now living in Florida.
To maintain your weight, you
should consume one per cent
fewer calories each year after
age 40, according to Diet Work-
shop.

He was arrested on Monday,
May 3, 1971 in DuPont Circlet
the scene of "very fierce fight-'
ing," and detained for 24 hours
in a prison next to John F. Ken-f
nedy Stadium.
"It was nice to see that theyj
had their wrists slapped," he
continued, "but I must admitt
that the cops did a damn good;
job there-they c l e a r e d the
streets of 10,000 people withoutj
killing anyone."
Cathy Courtney was a mem-,
ber of the Mt. Pleasant dele-
gation in Washington that May.
According to Courtney, while
she and others were in jail in I
Washington, friends were rais-
ing some $485 to get them out1
of j ail.
"I hope we will get some!
compensation," she said. I
But only those arrested on
the Capitol steps on Wednes-
day, May 5 are affected byI
Thursday's ruling. Other suits
are still pending, however.
DR. PAUL USLAN
Optometrist
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 Church 663-2476

HOWEVER, he roted that if
the cuts were as large as four
per cent, much of -hc decisions
might have to come from aca-
demic programs and faculty
since, "we're already severely'
understaffed in our non-aca-
demic positions. I don't think
we could make all our cuts
there."
Ihese cuts are (ouning out
of the hide of the la, ulty," de-
,dared Marc Ross, .:,aPrman of
the Residential College. He said
that his depa.'nient could siir-
v,, e the crisis withr!..t cutting
co- se offering-,.
At the University I oard of
Regents m e e t i n g yenerday,
Rhodes said that offi:ials were
working on "ou:ring a hearing
procedure for students who wish
to challenge tnu conitents of their
academic files."
UNDER A new fede al law,
students were granted access to
most of their academic recoids,1
including counseior commeT.ts
and test scores.
Rhodes said that final recom-
mendations on new hearing pro-
cedures would be made to the
Regents at the March meeting.
IPP~diic~d Patf~ TI

(Continued from Page 1)
they learned Pilot might be
doomed. Several indicated they
would actively oppose such aa
decision if it occurs.
WHILE the program's admin-
istrators at first refused to com-
ment on the report, Pilot Direc-
tor Richard Munson said he
would prepare "a strongly-
worded statement" if he is
convinced that discontinuation
is likely.
Tom Lobe, a Residential Col-
lege professor who directed Pi-
lot during 1970-72, reacted ang-
rily last night to what he term-J
ed "this University's absolute
lack of commitment to innova-
tion."
"By even considering ending
the program," Lobe said, "the
University of Michigan is prov-
ing itself to be the most uptight
institution around. If Pilot is
ordered to disappear, there aret
an awful lot of students and
administrators who will go to
bat for it."I
FOUNDED in 1962, the Pilot
Program is described by itsj
staffers as an attempt to place
education in "an innovative,
self-supportive living environ-
ment." Most Pilot courses are
taught by the 18 resident fel-
lows who live in Alice Lloyd
with the program's 550 students.
About a third of the students
are sophomores; the rest are
freshpersons.
While most LSA officials last
night were quick to stress that
no budget decisions have been
finalized, administrators agreed
that the. college's ecenomic sit-
uation has become critical.
"I'm very anxious to seea
that an innovative program like
Pilot doesn't have to go," said
Frye, "but we are now forced
to consider all possible sources
of cuts and show theme to the7
vice president (Rhodes)."1
The source of the original re-'
port said the Pilot "contin-
gency" grew out of some ad-
ministrators' feeling that "less
students are interested in thef
program" as well as the needI
to make major cuts.
"(Executive) committee mem-
krniinl, SfiiravI

bers think the kids don't care
as much about it anymore,"
said the source. "It doesn't look
good at all .. . Things are real,
real bad. Everything's getting
turned back."
students
upset over
proposed
Pilot cuts
(Continued from Page 1)
ed resident fellow Norman
Hartweg. "The things we're
learning here are going to
change the country in a way
that ordinary classes cannot."
Some students thought that
reasons other than financial
might be involved in the pro-

UNIVE
OF CHF
Present]
Y M-Y'
David G
10:00
Service.
Stude
For i
tation:f
FIRSTt
SCIENT
1833 Wa
Sunda
School-
Wedn
ing-8:0
Child
years;
years.
Readi
erty, 10

jected closing. "It's a political -- - -
thing," asserted freshwoman i
Joan Gibson. "They're thinking
of building a student apartment If
building near the stadium, but
they don't have enough money I
for Pilot."
Hartweg claimed that there !'
was a "large surplus" in the :
Pilot Program Fund. "But now t Ph
Housing wants to spend it ons
peepholes on doors, painting
frames, and buying a doughnut ' Ci
machine," he said.
Yet at least one student re-
mained hopeful about the ex- *
perimental program's future. "I I
don't think they'll get away I C
with it," stated sophomoreI
Chuck Lauer. "They're always I
trying to do things to Pilot. But
it's a good place to be, there's'
good counseling, and it would bei Di
a shame to lose it."
- - S
I
I
I
SOON I
all of N
ANN ARBOR
will be
ROCKING Sp
I
with
W103 FM'
' -----

RSITY CHURCH WELCOME TO ANN ARBOR 1
RIST FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
ly Meeting at 1420 Hill St.-668-9341
'WCA, 530 S. Fifth (if no answer, 769-3354,
Graf, Minister 971-4875, 665-2683)
Silent Meeting for Worship-
a.m. - Sunday Worship Sunday, 10-11 a.m.
First Day School, nursery/
nts Welcome. high, 10-11 a.m.
nformation or transpor- Adult Forum, 11-12.
663-3233 or 662-2494. Potluck every first Sundry,
Businessameeting every third
** * Sunday after worship.
CHURCH OF CHRIST, D a il y Morning Meditation
rIST (546 Walnut St.), 8:30-9 -.m.
Wednesday Sack Lunch (1073
ashtenaw East Engineering), 12-1 p in.
Service and Sunday Worship-sharing Groups (in
-ySrc a dmd homes), Tues. / Wed. / 'TIhurs.
-10:30 a.m.
esday Testimony Meet- Friday Evening Family Night
0(1420 Hill St.), 7:30-11 p.m -
Care-Sunday, under 2 s t o r i e s, discussions, games,
Wednesday, through 6 crafts, singing and dancing for
all ages.
ng Room- 306 E. Lib- American F r i e n d s Service
)-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat. Committee (AFSC), 1414 Tull
St., 761-8283.
CLIP AND SAVE --- Bail & Prison Reform, 761-
* 8283, 761-8331.
E Friends International (o-op,
+'+. 1416 Hill St., 761-7435.
IItl s ,Friends L a k e Community,
* 19,720 Waterloo Rd., Chelsea,
i 475-8775.
7 Movement for a New Soiety
I!(MNS), 665-6083.
one Numbers World Peace Tax Fund, Box
1447, Ann Arbor.
* * '* *
rCulation ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
764-0558 530 W. Stadium Blvd.
- y e (one block west ofj
U of M Stadium)
* ABible Study - Sunday, 9:30'
sfd. a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a m.
764-0557 1,and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a 1
662-9928. 5
Sl d UNIVERSITY REFORMED
764-0554 ' CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
I Ministers
W 9:30 a.m.-Church School.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Wors'uip.
764-0552 5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
764-0552 a" ". oe
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
orts (Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
764-0562 Weekend Masses:
Saturday: 5 p.m. and midight.
75 Sunday: 7:45 a.m., 9
CLIP AND SAVE ., 10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Events This Week:
Sunday, Dec. 8, 12:00 noon-
Holy Eucharist with a meal fol
lowing.
Tuesday, Dec. 10, 8:00 p.m.-
"Artists in the Church," an eve
ning with Ralph Carskadder
and Steve Iverson.
Friday, Dec. 13, 8:00 n.m.
Decking the Hall with greens.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Services at 9:30 and 11:0
a.m. Church School for all ages
Sermon: "Where Is Christ'
Church?" by Dr. Donald B
Strobe.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
4:30 p.m.-Film and Progran'
on "The Continuing War."
6:00 p.m.-Dinner.
6:45 p.m.-Celebration.
* * *
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
10:00 a.m. - Worship ServicE
and Church School.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801'S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Gordon Ward, Pastor
Sunday Service at 10.30 a.in.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and
at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Stud1y at 9:15.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
Evening at 10:00.
* , *
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-H61y Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communio

f
a
I
a
l
x
I
s

Billiards & Bowling at the Union
BILLIARDS $1/HR. BOWLING 40c
Free instructions per game
Pocket Billiards
Jan. 22 Sign up now
Cominq February 20 Mixed Leagues
Pocket Billiards Exhibition
Open 1 1 a.m. Mon.-Sat., 1 p.m. Sundays

and Sermon.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m
Evening Worship--7:00 p.m.

(plus 9:30 a.m. Northcampus).-

,1 AP~tbk$inWb NI d&.AaiAdW┬ž"C ld

I

Probably not. All things considered you do
what you do pretty doggone well. After all, no one
has taken your job. And you're eating regularly.
But...
But have you ever considered what doing your
job just a little better might mean?
Money. Cold hard coin of the realm.
If each of us cared just a smidge more about
what we do for a living, we could actually turn that
inflationary spiral around. Better products, better
service and better management would mean savings
for all of us. Savings of much of the cash and frayed
nerves it's costing us now for repairs and inefficiency.
Point two..By taking more pride in our work
we'll more than likely see America regaining its
strength in the competitive world trade arena. When
the balance of payments swings our way again we'll
all be better off economically.
So you see-the only person who can really

In the time it takes to drive
your friend home, you could save
his life.
If your friend's been drinking

for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take ten minutes. Or twenty.
Or an hour. Drive your friend

- -- -- -""" - - "

I

1

DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y*
BOX 2345
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852

i

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