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April 19, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, April 19, 1975

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Regents delay decision Wife-beating on the increase
(nn Cy l2 nrnnnlin Wayne, Washtenaw County

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YEARBOOKS

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Pick them up at
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on weekdays.

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By NORA POMERANTZ
The Board of Regents yester-
day postponed voting on a pro-
posal which recommends mas-
sive changes in the structure of
Student Government Council
(SGC) and increased student
participation in University de-
cision-making until at least
June.
The proposal was submitted
to the Regents last December
by the Commission to Study Stu-
dent Governance (CSSG). It
recommends a massive reorgan-
ization of SGC, student voting
membership on all University
executive and governing boards,
and a non-voting student mem-
ber to serve on the Board of
Regents.
REGENT Sarah Power (D-
Ann Arbor) suggested that the
Svote be postponed until Septem-
ber, explaining, "We are very
impressed with student and ad-
ministrative effort in the report,
but possibly more inclined to
wait until fall when students
will be here."

Although Power could not pre-
dict how the eventual Regental
vote would turn out, Regent
James Waters (D-Muskegon) ex-
pected that it would pass easily.
The faculty firmly rejected
the CSSG's recommendation for
student voting membership on
all University and executive
governing boards, according to
Prof. Carl Cohen, chairman of
the Student Advisory Committee
on University Afairs.
VICE-PRESIDENT for Student
Services and CSSG member
Henry Johnson chalked the fac-
ulty's negative response up to
procedural complaints, express-
ing confidence they would be
cleared up by a CSSG supple-
ment given to the Regents this
month.
Johnson supported the Re-
gents' decision to delay the
vote explaining, "They don't
feel they can make these de-
terminations without much more
dialogue and input from stu-
dents, which should come in
the fall."

While conceding that the pro-
posal could not have been im-
plemented until fall, Education
Advocate and CSSG member
Bob Stephens pointed out that
people could have started plan-
ning it this summer had the Re-
gents approved it at last week's
meeting.
STEPHENS declared, "Though
I don't think the document is
that threatening, I couldn't even
guess how the Regents will vote.
I'm just not sure how far they're
willing to go."
The Regental delay would not
seriously effect implementation
of the proposal, if approved,
since changes largely require
student initiation, as in the case
of SGC reorganization.
The Regents failed to set a
date for a vote on the proposal,
but agreed to decide sometime
in the next couple of months
whether to delay it until Septem-
ber. Regent Gerald Dunn (D-
Lansing) concluded, "We've
waited so long, we can wait a
little longer."

By ELLEN BRESLOW
Last Monday night, Julia Mc-
Gee was beaten to death by her
husband in their Ann Arbor
apartment as her daughter tried,
in vain to obtain help from a
neighbor. The woman was later
found dying in a pool of blood
by Ann Arbor Police Chief Wal-
ter Krasny.
A few days later, Elsie Mon-
tique was sentenced to 4-15
years in prison on a homicide
conviction for murdering her
husband, a man who had re-
peatedly beaten her during their
marriage.
WEDNESDAY nighta
woman and her three-vear-old
daughter were rescued from a
phone booth after 8 hours of
fleeing further assault from the
woman's husband. He had at-
tacked her in the lobby of
Planned Parenthood last week
after she had just undergone an
abortion.
Wife-beating is one of the
most ignored assault crimes in
Wayne and Washtenaw Coun-
ties, according to Washtenaw
County Commissioner Kathy
Fotjik, president of the local
chapter of the National Organ-
ization of Women (NOW) and
head of the newly organized Wo-
man and Wife - Assault Task

Force. The lack of seriousness with
"The Washtenaw County po- which the problem is treated
lice refer to wife - beating as has left women with three alter-
a 'one punch fight,"' said Pot- natives, the study concluded:
jik. "But just this week proves they can either file for criminal
this isn't so," she added. justice, a procedure which of-
fers "a lot of expense and has-
"T H E Y (the police) are sle with little relief;" utilize
told 'don't arrest, avoid' in civil outlets in the form of di-
their training," she continued. vorce; or turn to murder, as in
"The whole problem is perceiv- the case of Ms. Montique.
ed as a family squabble which
should not be interfered with." "THERE is nothing wrong
Krasny asserted, however, with the present assault law,"
that "wife - beating, like any said Pat Micklov. "It is just
other felonious offense, must that it isn't enforced," she
occur in the presence of the added.
officer for an arrest to take In answer, the task force has
place." instituted - an "immediate pro-
According to a study of 20 tection" alternative. Shelters
wife - beating victims by law are now being set up throughout
students Sue Eisenberg and Pat Wayne and Washtenaw Coun-
Micklow, "Sixty per cent of the ties to house victims of wife-
involved men were drunk dur- beating assaults.
ing thb assault, 50 per cent of According to Sue Eisenberg,
the assailants had a history of "The shelters are our best bet
beating in their family and 40 right now. First, they provide
per cent of the women had beat- an eyesore in the community.
ing in their family background." 1f n het kt the

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FUR T HE RM OR E, in
80 per cent of the studied cases
the men had been dishonorably
discharged from the military
and the women claim that the
methods with which they had
been beaten could only have
been learned in the armed ser-
vices.
Nineteen out of the 20 women
suffered injury during the first
year of their marriage, with
increased intensity or frequen-
cy in time. There was also a
disturbing occurrence of assault
in the abdomen during preg-
nancy.
In most of the incidences, the
women had called the police on
several occasions, but with lit-
tle result. Patterns were rarely
recognized by authorities.
THE TASK force is presently
in the process of going through
all city police assault records
to obtain the uncalculated sta-
tistics and records on the sub-
ject.
"However, Police Chief Kras-
ny has been most. uncoopera-
tive," said Fotjik emphatically.

it opUJS.. 11 V . LU AUUJS M(LIM
building, they'll know the
problem is there."
"They also supply the best
opportunities for legal and
emotional assistance, provide
possibilities of employment, and
can aid the children of the wo-
men, too," she added.
While Eisenberg admitted
that the shelters are far from
permanent solutions, she con-
cluded, "First we need mass
education to create presstire,
then we can deal with legisla-
tion.
'thru
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A dramatic reading of
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ALL ARE INVITED!
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Morning worship: 10 a.m.
1236 WASHTENAW CT.
(corner of Washtenaw
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REV. DON POSTEMA,j
Pastor

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Whether you use in dash or underdash is up to you-
Giving you the best of each is up to US!

The University Constituent's
Alliance wants to make
Student Government a viable
force on campus.
You Can HelpI
VOTE
UCAA
April 21-25 election

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