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January 09, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, January 9, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

thursday1 January 9, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Met tenor Richard Tucker
dies of heart attack at 61

I

By AP and Reuter
KALAMAZOO, Mich. - Rich-
ard Tucker, renowned tenor
withrNew York's Metropolitan
Opera, died of a heart attack
yesterday in Kalamazoo where
he was to appear in an evening
concert, a hospital spokesman
said.
Tucker was 61.
Robert Merrill, the baritone
singer who was touring with
Tucker, said Tucker collapsed
in his hotel room Wednesday
afternoon and died at Bronson
Hospital soon after.
"He was the greatest tenor
in the world," Merrill said.
Merrill said he was on an ex-
tended tour with Tucker that
had included a Feb. 6 engage-
ment at Carnegie Hall in New
York. He said the tour would
be canceled and he planned to
return to New York on Thurs-
day after completing arrange-
ments.
He said Tucker apparently
had a long history of heart
trouble.

Tucker came to stardom at
the Met during the war years
when the famed American

At 20, he had established
himself as an outstanding can-
tor in Brooklyn.

opera house found it impossible On Feb. 11, 1936, he married
to import its usual number of the former Sara Perelmuth, the
international stars. "We made sister of the noted tenor, Jan
a virtue of necessity and Mr. Peerce.
Tucker shot to stardom," a MetP .
spokesman said. Tucker had little professional
On Jan. 25, Tucker would operatic experience prior to his
have celebrated the 30th anni- debut with the Metropolitan
versary of his debut with the Opera in 1945. He was a con-
Met. testant in the "Metropolitan Au-
Tucker was born Reuben Tick- ditions of the Air," winning sec-
er on Aug. 28, 1913, to Jewish ond place. It was at this time
immigrant parents. He was one that he changed his name to
of five children. Richard Tucker.

i
1
i

}
l
3

At the age of 6, he began
singing in the choir of the Al-
len Street synagogue on Man-
hattan's Lower East Side.

In 1944, he obtained an au-
dition with the Met's general
manager, Edward Johnson. Te
audition led to his engagement
Sn lan din . t .nr fnr the nna

ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 1941
MR. AND MRS. SMITH
Something very rare for Hitchcock-his only
screwball comedy. A marriage breaks up but
the couple (Carole Lombard and Robert Mont-
gomery) keep bumping into each other for
hilarious results.
FRI.: Cary Grant in TOPPER
SAT.: Clark Gable in IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT
Cinema Guild TONIGHT ADM. ONLY $1
C VO UI AT 9:05 ARC . AUD.
TONIGHT-TIFMurs., Jan. 9
8:00 p.m.
Meet and talk with old
and new friends
Israeli Dancing
FREE Felafel and Coke
All at HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.
663-3336

After graduating from high a a auleIor1)1LIopera
school, he worked days as a company.
runner for a Wall Street broker- He made his debut at the Met
age firm, and later as an errand on Jan. 25, 1945, as Enzo Gri-
boy in New York's garment dis- maldo in La Giconda. A critic
trict, while studying voice in for The New York Times said
the evenings. He subsequently Tucker "sang with warmth
opened his own garment dye and expressiveness and his act-
shop, but continued his singing. ing was natural and easy."

Tuer

GLUING FLOWERS FOR CASH

By DAVID BURHENN poser. They are monumental
wnear capacity Musical So- wrks - sublime in their com-
A ner cpaciy Msica So plexity, and verymuch unique.
ciety audience at the Power The Guarneri's interpretation
Center last night was treated to was somewhat understated, but
a performance by some masters nevertheless showed insight into
of their craft. the multi-leveled nuances in
- The Guarneri Quartet rein- this lengthy work. The opening
forced a widespread belief that chords of the first movementj
they hold the greatest claim to were particularly breath-tak-
the mythical title o f t h e ing, as if the four instruments
"world's foremost string quar- had become one gigantic six-
tet." teen-stringed unity.
Of course, one cannot rate The tone throughout was con-
quartets-like baseball teams or sistently beautiful, t h o u g h
heavy-weight fighters, and it a certain dryness was present
is absurd to try. in some passages. This aridity
But the Guarneri, composed could perhaps be blamed on the:
of violinists Arnold Steinhardt Power Center. The vast expanse
aid John Dalley, violist Michael of concrete walls and floor can-
Tree, and cellist David Soyer, not offer the mellow acoustics
performed with a solid, and in- of the heavily upholstered and
deed, almost uncanny grasp of carpeted Rackham Amphithe-i
their art in a performance of ater, where most chamber con-
Schubert, Beethoven, and Dvor- certs have been held.
ak. The Dvorak with Graffman,I
In the last work, concert provided a colorful lively end-
ianist Gary Graffman added ing to the evening. The work
is considerable talents in a was performed with consider-
erformance of the Dvorak ably more gusto by the musi-
uintet in A major, Op. 81. cians, who seemed to light into7
The first half of the program the folksy Eastern European
as led off by the Schubert character of the quintet.
uartettsatz in C Minor. As its A definite highlight was thej
itle implies, the work is in second movement, based on a
ne movement. It is a quartet Czechoslovak dance called a
11 of contrasts. It was per- dumnka. Cellist Soyer, and viol-l
rned with brilliant clarity, ist Tree were especially de-
nd almost perfect ensemble. lightful in their soulful interpre-
here seemed to be a unani- tations of the slow theme. {
ity of musical feeling be- Graffman handled his partt
een the four that was trans- with authority and ensemble
fitted into a unanimity of mu- between the strings and piano
ical expression. was consistently good.1
The Guarneri performed the:.:.:.::::. f t
ichubert and the Beethoven Op.1
27 quartet with amazing phy-
ical nonchalance. There was
one of the strenuous body Eng- 4
ish that many quartets employ
n order to reach some expres-f
ionistic bond.
The Beethoven is the first of
he late quartets of the com-
SHABBAT SHALOM
from HILLEL
Friday, January 10
COME TO ONE, TWO OR ALL THREE
MINYAN-5:00 p.m.
SHABBAT DINNER-6:O0 p.m.
SHABBAT CIRCLE-7:30 p.m.
ONEG SHABBAT-8:15 p.m.
"AN INTRODUCTION TO THE WORLD
OF CHASSIDISM T H R O U G H TALK,
SONG, AND DANCE.
Dinner Reservations by 10 a.m. Fri.

Students prep

Rose Parade

By SARAH POLAREK
Special To The Daily
PASADENA, Calif. - Whittier.
Christian High School junior
Jim Bliss nervously glanced at
the clock as he carefully ap-
plied another orange carnation
petal to the model Golden Gate
Bridge before him. With only 361
hours until parade time, there'
were still thousands of onion,
seeds needed to complete the

plained. "That'll help us fi-
nance this year's Junior-Senior
banquet."
The students are employed
by one of six float-making cor-
porations which handle the con-
struction details for float spon-
sors. Yet these companies are
hardly begging for help each
December. "We've been on a
waiting list for nearly two
years," Bliss said. "We were

Transamerica and
America buildings.

Bank of

finally contacted only in No-
'' I r

Bliss was one of 50 Whitti
students working on the S
Francisco float in preparati
for the 46th Tournament
Roses parade, Pasadena's a
nual New Year's Day event.
Starting on December2
Bliss and his friends spent ov
10 hours a day arranging a
attaching several thousand y
low roses, orange and whr
carnation petals, yellow chry
anthemums, evergreenbough
onion seeds, ti leaves, ar
ferns - and all for the e
tremely small wage of $1.80 p
hour.
In all, hundreds of Pasaden
area students give up four da
of Christmas vacation each ye
to work in drafty factory buil
ings completing constructi
work on the giant parade float
And surprisingly enough, it,
the paltry wage that attrac
them to the job: working
Rose Parade floats is simp
one of the best ways for ar
student groups to raise funds
"Together, we'll make $4,
for these four days," Bliss e

er
an
on
of
an-
28, I
er
rnd
el-
itek
Ys-
hs,
nd
X.-

vem er.
But many groups have been
working on the floats for years.
Walt Thistlewaite, a freshman
at the University of California-
Irvine, w o r k e d on floats
throughout his high school
years for the youth group of a
local Methodist church. "As
long as we did good work,"
Thistlewaite said, "they kept
calling us back."
Floatsconstruction actually
begins soon after the previous
New Year's spectacle has end-
ed and the thousands of flowers
have been sent to nearby hos-

pitals. The professional builders
prepare extensive designs and
finally construct rough frames
atop stripped-down truck chas-
sis.
Students are brought in only
for the last two steps of the
process: painting the frame to
match the design and the actual
application of flowers.
Petals of hardier blooms can
be glued directly onto the chick-
en wire surface, but roses, gar-
denias, and orchids - with
stems intact - must be placed
in water - filled vials that are
concealed within the frame.
The great preponderance of
flowers - some floats require
as many as 350,000 blooms -
make Rose Parade entries ex-
tremely costly. "The Occidental
Life Insurance float cost more
than $40,000 this year," said
one float construction company
executive. "Ten years ago it
only cost $20,000."

But even though the working
students receive only one per-
cent of the total cost, none of
them are complaining. "It's
fun," said a member of Pasa-
dena American Field Service
organization. "And it's a great
way to serve the club."

I

TEAC 160...The emphasis
is on price, but not at the
expense of performance.

"May be the most
passionately felt epic
ever made in this
country. It's an epic
vision of the corruption
of America!"
Pauline Kael,
The New Yorker Maqazine
The Godfather
Part I1

er
nai TiCKETS JUST WENT ON SALE
ysar GET GOOD SEATS NOW!
on
ts.
IS
Its
on
ly
ea
150
.
UAC CONCERT CO-OP presents
JOHN PRUNE
AND HIS BAND
Thurs., Jan. 16, Power Center, 8 p.m.
Reserved seats $4.00. Available at UM Union 11-5:30
doily (763-4553), Ann Arbor Music Mart on State St.,
Recordland at Briarwood, and Huckleberry Party Store in
Ypsi. Sorry, no personal checks. Smoke not in concert hall
-kee good music on comous.
The Center for Cinese Studies
and the Center for Russian and
East European Studies
PRESENT A LECTURE BY
Dr. Roderick MacFarquhar
ON
I ~"7he C/thee
Thursday, Jan. 9-8:00 p.m.
West Conf. Room, Rackham
Dr. MacFarquhar is one of the world's
leading authorities on contemporary
China, a former editor of China Quar-
terly, and author of The Origins of the

m

' . ,f -mi ~trne but I" \lquel
E, b bde pie\ia g
i .i, i )I ;;} 1PtJ t p ifFt-ic f,
~to 'Fl ' 1 . am( I J J

I

2300S. The Fundamental Teac.

I. cnni look beyond the cast arrayi of features that, help
.0' I iithe enu,,\'Iirt of taie rcC morde rsyon get down to)
A design Philosophy that has every-
ting o do wih ia -well and how long your tape reci.orderi
t, Il tt'r, }-
TFA ha ( en 1 1i! this quarter-track stere'o deckV
1'or w aig mo 1d'ong id i n S,'+ t e t pors w a 2200
(,r l i re~ec .inrthe120Seie}than any other open
i'er l raoperaior er.
for . olIih uttn loie ciricuitry 'wit h fnll iremote control
ltIotrolsfor ianard line input~s antI line outputs.,I7
tt' r . v hi mahin inideand ont. It .works wvell for'
u 11e li 1 e,[ytIivyeou a dmnonstration and disuss
~499.50

--l

T EAC.

H IL L E L, 1429 Hill St.

663-3336

We are having our annual
Midnight Madness
SALE
All Inventory presently
priced 10-50% off
*During Midnight Sale
an additional
200/0 will be taken off
Friday Night-Jan. 10
7 p.m.-] a.m.

The Teac 3605. Following the leader.
Two years ago TEAC introdnced the 450, a cassette deck
so good a lot of reel-to-reel machines were suddenly out-
perfiormed, never mind other typical cassette decks.
The 360S is now following the leader. You still get the
same advanceid transport drive system that produces an
iiiredible lhk of wow and flutter (less than 0.07O
W1I{S). A all the other engineering accomplishments
that first miade ctasst te decks respectable in sophisticatedT -
S stemsT 1 1 las a c4n
Things like Dolby* circuitry, enhanced by a tone genei,
ator and librati co trol,,,ieak indicator light, ta pC --ri'iiurriuijnuiiu n
memory and automatic :shut-off.
We'd be happy to give you a demonstratiorn of the 360'.
The major difference between it and the 450 is price.
Which makes it a leader in its own right.

I

$379.50

' I),ylby i a trademark of 1)nlbtiLaharatorir<, InC.

NN

ARB R

usIC

.
4r s .
k, f
"k, .

I

ii



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