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April 18, 1975 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-18

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Page Ten

i HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 18. 1975

Page Ten ~LIE MICHIGAN DAILY

-, . -1 . - I -

NON-REVENUES FIRST?

Beginning Friday, April 18
1317 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
ENTIRE STOCK
REDUCED FOR SALE

Sort

budget cuts

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By RICK BONINO program we have now," Can-
(Last of a two-part series) ham said.
As any coach can tell you, Initial slashes may well oc-
there's only one way to go when cur in Michigan's non-revenue
you're on top - down. sports - wrestling, track, gym-
Michigan's athletic program nastics, baseball, swimming,
faces such a dilemma both on golf and tennis. Many other pro-
the field and in the ledger. Peak }ects, such as the million-dol-
performances, particularly in lar Track-Tennis building, rely
football, have pushed Wolverine on the big money-makers for re-
athletic revenues to the nation's venue. Expense cuts that could
highest mark. But the intake affect those revenues - such
probably won't go much high- as football scholarship limita-
er, and as expenses rise at the tions-appear risky.
current rapid rate Michigan Football stands by far as the
athletic director Don Canham department's top revenue
begins to contemplate program source. Bo's boys annually ac-
cuts. count for three million of the
"Unless something is done program's four million dollar
in the very near future we revenue. Gate receipts from all
will not be able to balance our other sports total less than 300,-
budget and maintain the same 000.
When you consider the de-

Men's & Women's

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EVERY BOOK IN
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1229 S. University

partment spends $600,000 yearly
on these sports - as compared
to $730,000 for football - it be-
comes obvious the program gets
more for its dollar when it in-
vests in the gridiron game. But
football doesn't stand immune
from expense cuts.
"If the NCAA takes action,
the cuts may well come across
all sports," Canham said. "if
rnot, and the Big Ten takes
action, then football and bas-
ketball may be temporarily
exempted."
The NCAA previously reject-
ed proposals such as a return
to one platoon football and re-
cru iting visit limitatiols. Ano-
ther meeting is scheduled^for
next Thursday and Friday in
Kansas City.

ail
Sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL CRANE
Even in the absence of offi-
ial action, some Michigan pro-
grams have been forced to tight-
en their belts.
The Michigan wrestling squad
already saves money by shar-
ing training facilities with foot-
ball, and this year stopped tak-
ing an extra wrestler on road
trips because of the increased
costs.
"In the future I can see us
moving in a cot and putting
three men in a two-man room
on the road," said wrestling
coach Bill Johannesen.
Such measures only foresha.
dow more extensive proeram
cuts. Hopefully, Michigan stauds
at least a few years away
from drastic measures, but
Canham is preparing.
"We're trying to economize so
we don't have to cut teams,
eliminate sports or restrict their
competition," Canham s a i d .
"But after we make certain cuts
and there is still a financial
crunch - and I'm talking five
vears on down the line -- then
travel cuts would be the next
step."
Canham expects those "cer-
tain cuts" to come in the schol-
arship and recruiting field.
Here, once again, the non-.re-
venue sports may take the worst
beating.
I M O N EY-SAVI

"Maybe we'll have to say
that only the income sport
creates can be used for schol-
arships," Canham said. Of
the non-revenue sports, oply
track, wrestling, gymnastics
and swimming produce any
gate receipts.
The program's most recent
non-revenue additions, the wo-
men's program, would remain
least affected by such cuts. Can-
ham said the women realize the
mens' mistakes and aren t push-
ing for scholarships, recruit
from the student body and play
their games close to home.
"If you could redesign t h e
men's program from scratch
you'd pattern it after wha+ the
women are doing today," Can-
ham said.
Still, the women's prugrm
will cost an estimated $80,000
this year. Associate women's
athletic director Marie Hartwig
amits this represents a con-
siderable expense.
"I don't want to deny the
girls any opportunities, but
this (a woman's program) is
a terrible burden to have plac-
ed on your budget with no'
new income," Hartwig said.
"It could be the downfall of a
few programs."
Fortunately, Michigan's suc-
cessful program stands far
from such catastrophe. But ris-
in expenses threaten the pro-
gram's independence. Mi :higan
wossesses one of the few pro-
arams that has not turned to
university general funds for help
as the economic situation wors-
ens.
"Hopefully we can make cuts
and balance the budget withut
having to go to the general
IN G COUPON E
r U

Students Needed
for Athletic Committee
POSITIONS ARE ON:
* Advisory Committee on
Recreation, Intramural,
& Club Sports (ACRICS)
* Board in Control of In-
tercollegiate Athletics
Interviews will be held Tuesday,
April 22. Drop by the SGC office,
third floor of the Union, for more
information.

7i

fund," Canham said. "Trngs , toss before a cheering throng,
look a little better no.v than knowing the health and inde-
they did before Mr. Schembech- 2endence of his program rely
ler started to haul all those po- largely on the huge crowds he
ple in." and his teammates must con-
So we return to our s-ariung tinue to attract.
point - Michigan end Speedo Hang on, Speedo. Hang on for
Flyfingers grabbing that scoing your life.
Sports o The Daily
Swimming cutback at Washington
By The Associated Press
SEATTLE-Olympic swimmer Rick DeMont, who lost his
gold medal in 1972 in a controversial drug ruling, has withdrawn
from the University of Washington because of financial cutbacks
affecting the future of the Husky swim program.
DeMont was unavailable for comment. But his mother,
Mrs. Willard DeMont, said, "The lack of funding was the No.
1 factor."
DeMont won the Olympic 400-meter freestyle gold medal, but
it was taken from him when it was ruled that medication he
had been taking for asthma was illegal.
0
Good football from bad times?
ANNAPOLIS-Navy football Coach George Welsh said yesterday
the poor economy and the end of the Vietnam war have aided
in recruiting high school athletes for the U.S. Naval Academy.
"I think the attitudes have changed," Welsh said.
"The high school athletes are more receptive to the academy
than they were."
The Spirit of the'76ers
PHILADELPHIA-Up to 75 per cent of the fans at the
Philadelphia 76ers games this season were nonpaying customers,
according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.
Inquirer columnist Frank Dolson said yesterday the NBA
team inflated attendance figures by failing to report sub-
stantial numbers of free tickets.
General Manager Pat Williams said, however, the practice
was "what the NBA has done for 30 years, and that is announce
the number of people in the house."
Excellent Summer Jobs
JEWEL COMPANY, Detroit, Mich.
Work an established route in Detroit or be a
customer representative. Otherdopenings in
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Fri., April 17 18. Register by Phone or in per-
son. 763-4117. Further details available.
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SAT., APRIL 19th, 9:00 a.m.- 1 :00 p.m.
This fourteen hour group expeience utilizes R-E-T and
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R-E-T 105 course. Fee $35, S10.00 deposit required.
Advanced R-E-T 105 course 8 weeks on Monday, April 21
through Monday, June 9, 1975 (7:00-9:30 p.m.). In depth super-
vision in the theory and practice of R-E-T through lecture,
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THESE TWO ARE REQUIRED FOR THE WEEK LONG
RESIDENTIAL R-E-T TRAINING PROGRAM, JUNE 22-27
FOR INFO. AND RESERvATION:
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a non profit organization)
2512 Carpenter Rd.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
phone: clays 971-1203; evenings 483-1510

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