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April 17, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-17

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Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, April 17, 1975

0 $3.00

Blue

athletic

e partment

is NCAA's top moneymaker

1

THURS.-FRI.-SAT.

A

By RICK BONINO
(First of a two part series)
Michigan end Speedo Flyfingers leaps
high to snare the touchdown bomb as
the crowd cheers-100,000 fans at seven
dollars a head sitting in the two million
dollar stadium watching a student in a
5200 uniform catch a $28 piece of pig-
skin.
Speedo is fictitious, but the figures
are real. As money becomes tight,
athletic programs across the nation
are growing concerned with financing
I their expensive games.
Michigan's athletic program oper-
ates much like a regular business.
Unlike most other college under-
takings, the program has remained
self-supporting, relying on no Univer-
sity funds. Under such circumstances,
success at the gate becomes crucial.
Luckily for Wolverine fans, the pro-
gram's annual four million dollar rev-
enue.(three million from football) ranks
first in the nation, according to Michi-
gan athletic director Don Canham.
These revenues left an $80,000 surplus
after regular expenses in 1973-74, ac-

cording to a University report.
Those expenses don't include $711,000
of a borrowed million dollars used to
build the Track-Tennis facility. While
user fees won't come close to repaying
the sum, Canham said, other revenues-
mainly from football-will. So far the
payments are on schedule.
Yost Field House was also renovated
to the tune of $400,000, but that cost
was covered entirely by reserves built
up from previous years.
"The real justification for sports
at Michigan is that it's self-sustain-
ing," Canham said. "We're not taking
part of the faculty's salary to send
a track team to the Penn Relays."
But, like other businesses today, the
athletic program faces serious finan-
cial difficulties. While new buildings
go up, all existing facilities need re-
pair, including extensive plumbing,
concrete and electrical work at the
stadium.
The eroding dollar may prove more
of a threat than eroding buildings. In-
flation has forced salaries up, increased
travel and utility expenses and raised

scholarship costs.
"Our expenses have almost doubled
since I became athletic director (seven
years ago)," Canham said. "Our budget
has gone from $2.6 million to four mil-
lion dollars."
Obviously, the department can take
one of two routes to balance the bud-
get-they can increase revenues, or
cut expenses.
Canham said the program will have
trouble simply maintaining current
revenues. Michigan led the nation in
average football attendence in 1972
and 1974. Seven home games next
year, including the ever-popular Ohio
State clash, could swell the gates
even more.
But Canham wonders if Maize and
Blue. fans will find enough green and
silver to buy tickets as the recession
drags on.
The pros also threaten Michigan's at-
tendance. The Detroit Lions move to
sparkling new Pontiac Stadium next
fall-right in the heartland of Michi-
gan's outside fan support.

go to Pontiac this weekend instead of
Ann Arbor'," Canham asked. "If they
do, we could run into a deficit."
The pros have already contributed
to low attendance figures. Basketball
attendance last year continued a de-
cline begun in 1973-74, partly due to
star cager Campy Russell's defection
to the NBA. Still, basketball and
hockey remain the only other sports
which pay their own way.
If you can't draw more people, you
can always make the ones you do
attract pay more. But don't worry-
Canham has no intention of recom-
mending ticket price increases. No user
fee increases appear imminent, either.
"We'll have to have some restrictions
on the Track-Tennis building use (due
to .overcrowding)," Canham said, "but
that may not involve raisiing user
fees."
With attendance at optimum levels
and no price increases planned, only
cuts can successfully combat rising ex-
penses. The problem lies in determining
where and how cuts will be made.
Tomorrow: Trimming the budget

Mini-Folk
Festival
(A Ceilidh)

with

I
I
I
t

John Roberts
Tony Barrand
Margaret
MacArthur
Maggie Pierce

"Are people

going to say, 'Hey, let's

EISNER EXPERIMENT:
Netters try meditation

r

I

IMformation

and

Owen McBride
(and possibly
several surprise
guests)
A 3 Day
Musical Party
to end the
semester

By BRIAN DEMING :::........................
The athlete's search continues
for the magic formula-the cer-
tam secret that will give him ::
the crucial edge.
batics, ballet, and isometrics
now comes the unlikely tech- NIGHT EDITOR:
nique of Transcendental Medi- ANDY GLAZER
tation (TM).
AMONG ATHLETES....................rr';<"":
who now practice this seeming- to Coach Brian Eisner's net-
ly exotic method are New York ters
Jet quarterback Joe Namath, "I know very little about it,"
Philadelphia Philly shortstop! Eisner admitted, but, from what
Larry Bowa, New York Met he has learned of the practice,I
catcher Jerry Grote, outfielder "there might be some real
Willie Stargell of the Pitts- benefits."
burgh Pirates, golfer Gary SUISTA aebe
Player and Bill Walton of bas- STUDIES THAT have been
ketball's Portland Trail Blazers, taken of the effects of T. M.
In a few days you might add indicate a quicker reaction time
Michigan's tennis team to that among athletes who meditate.
list. As Eisner points out, a quick
Donald R. Leopold. Director of reaction time is vital in tennis.

WED.-

Hoot 75c

mmmlaw"Plow

LS & STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Is Holding It's Election
FRIDAY, APRIL 18
LS & A Student Government publishes the Disorientation
Booklet for incoming freshpeople, appoints students to Col-
lege committees, administers funds and acts as an advocate
for LS & A students.
This year the LS & A Student Government was a moving
force working against the proposed dorm rent rate hike. The
success of this effort saved students hundreds of thousands
of dollars. The LS & A Student Government has acted to
protect less conventional educational programs such as
Pilot Program, Course Mart, and Independent Study.
Vote to Maintain a Strong College Government
VOTE APRIL 18-

l ljxu t. , ~1 11 ltV 1
the Institute for Fitness and
Athletic Excellence, is giving a
lecture about Transcendental
Meditation on the 21st of April
YOUR FRIENDS
WILL NEVER
KNOW.
UM Stylists
at the Union

Transcendental M e d i t a-
tion is not asbizarre a prac-
tice as it might sound. The
method requires just forty min-
utes a day of meditation, sitting'
comfortably in a quiet room.
THE TECHNIQUE,
made famous by Maharishi Ma-
hesh Yogi, has been accredited
with a wide spectrum of bene-
fits including improved athletic
performance. Increased intelli-
gence, improved academic per-
formance, and most of all in-
creasedd. concentration, confi-
dence, and ability to enjoy life

can be some of it dividends.
If Transcendental Meditation
catches on at the Michigan ath-
letic Department the possibili-
ties are endless. One can forsee
Bo Schembechler rallying the
Wolverines at a halftime ses-
sion oftranquil meditation and
going on to beat Ohio State 38-7.
As the teams leave the field,
Bo gently puts an understand-
ing arm on Woody's shoulder,
gives him a flower, and in a
peacefully euphoric voice whis-
pers "peace."
Flowers to
Notre Dame;
wolverines
get Greene
By RICH LERNER
J u n i o r college standout
Ricky Greene has signed a na-
tional letter of intent to attend
Michigan onea basketball schol-
arship. While basketball coach
Johnny Orr succeeded in sign-
ing the 6-2 guard, highly sought
Bruce Flowers of Berkley yes-
terday announced his intention
to attend Notre Dame.
Greene, a two-time JUCO-all-
American at Vincennes (Ind.)
Junior College, was named Chi-
cago's player of the year in
1973, when he teamed with Wol-
verine forward JohneRobinson to
lead Hirsch High School to the
Illinois State Championship.
The 6-8 Flowers released
his decision at a press con-
ference held in the Berkley
High School cafeteria. Flow-
ers cited Notre Dame's small
size as a major factor in his
decision.
Study i Italy
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Trinity College/Rome Campus
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Tuiton,
room & board.
excursions,
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I I

Liebster, Jacob ..
By, .top JIMlstars
By MARCIA MERKER
Tuesday night the unsung heroes of intramural sports gath-
ered at Crisler Arena for the annual awards ceremony. All the
ballots had been marked and tabulated, and the winners of the
highly valued Intramural Department awards came to the fore
for trophies and pats on the back.
The all-around athlete-of-the-year, the Earl Riskey Award,
went to Jeffrey Liebster. The 5-10 junior earned all-star status in
softball as a shortstop and in touch football as a wide receiver.
As team manager of the first-place independent team, Uber-
mensch, Liebster participated in nearly every competitive event
and won independent team manager-of-the-year.
The Intramural Department recognized Elyse Jacob as
the outstanding all-around female athlete-of-the-year. In
winning the Marie P. Hartwig Award, Jacob placed in the
top four of every women's competitive racket sport this
school year.
Jacob also played in volleyball, basketball, touch football,
water polo and for the women's co-runner-up softball team,
Amazin' Blue.
In the fraternity division, Phi Delta Theta won the team
award. Phil Johnson of Delta Upsilon, the runner-ups, took the
fraternity athlete award by starring in softball and football.
Allen Rumsey, of West Quad, grabbed the Residence Hall
team trophy sparked by that division's athlete-of-the-year, Bob
Montgomery. Couzens finished second in the league and Michi-
gan House's Hilliard Blank took the manager award.
The Graduate Division team award went to the Business
School's KR's. Karl Lutz from Law Green won the Individ-
ual athlete recognition.
Finishing ahead of Amazin' Blue and Couzens, the Bombers
continued their reign in the women's competitive division. How-
ever, Shellee Almquist of Amazin' Blue copped the manager-of-
the-year award.
As summer draws near, the Intramural Building is reducing
its hours andaltering paddleball and squash court procedures.
Elective last Monday the phone court-reservation system is no
longer in use. Reservations until fall can only be made on the
day of play and in person at the general office, Sports Building.
During the soring term, slow and fast pitch softball, volley-
ball and basketball will be offered at a nominal fee. Applications
for these snorts, as well as those for tennis singles and doubles,
naddleball and racquetball men's and women's singles, paddle-
ball and racquetball co-rec doubles, squash singles and golf, are
due in the Snorts Building Friday, May 9. Play begins the fol-
lowing Monday.
SHARDIK
The new book by Richard Adams, author
of WATERSHIP DOWN" is here.
t For a limited time you can buy BOTH
Q "SHARDIK" & "WATERSHIP DOWN"
for $13.90-a savings of $3.00at
CENTICORE BOOKSHOP
336 MAYNARD
H IROKO YAJIMA

i

I

THE RUDOLF STEINER INSTITUTE OF THE GREAT LAKES AREA
presents:
KARMA and REINCARNATION
A public CONFERENCE conducted by
HAGEN BIESANTZ, Ph.D., from Dornoch, Switzerland
Dates: FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY, APRIL 18,19 and 20,1975
Place: THE RUDOLF STEINER HOUSE, 1923 Geddes Avenue, Ann Arbor
PROGRAM
FRIDAY, April 18:
7:30 PM.-Registration.
8:00 P.M.-Dr. H. Biesontz, lecture I:
KARMA, PREDESTINATION, FREEDOM AND GRACE
SATURDAY, April 19:
10:00 A.Mr-uestions and Discussion (Dr. Biesontz and Panel).
2:00-3:30 P.M.-Artistic activities
4:00-5:30 P.M.-Artistic activities
8:00 P.M.-Dr. H. Biesantz, lecture II:
RUDOLF STEINER'S RESEARCHES ON
KARMA AND REINCARNATION
SUNDAY, April 20:
10:00 A.M.-Questions and Discussion (Dr. Biesantz and Panel).
3:00 P.M.-Dr. H. Biesantz, lecture III:
KARMA, REINCARNATION AND THE CHRIST
LIGHT REFRESHMENTS AND OPPORTUNITY FOR INFORMAL CONVER-

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the music
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Partial list of subjects covered during
our 12-week course:
" Sound properties and acoustical phenomena
" Electronic generation and modification of sound
" Theory and use of voltage-controlled equipment
" Tape recorder characteristics and operation
" Studio recording, splicing and mixing techniques
555 e. william 994-5404
CLASSES BEGIN FIRST WEEK OF MAY

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June 14.July 21

Anthropology* Renaissance Art
Pointing, Drawing, and Design
Itolion Language " Roman Art
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(203)527-3153ext. 221

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In concert with
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APRIL 17
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