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April 17, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

Thursday, Aprtl t , r

[HE MICHIGAN WA1LY

ThrdyA .7 ,TY

_...

.e

TONIGHT at 9:00
' R
a'4'
theRFD BOYS
AT THE
PRETZEL BELL
EVERY THURSDAY- :00
EVFRY FRI. & SAT-10:00

SPIRITUAL.COMMUNITY OF THE SUN
PRESENTS
DICK GREGORY
* Speakinq on the food crisis and survival of humanity *,
FRI., MAY 16, 1975-7:00 P.M.
UNIV. OF MICH. BALLROOM
Donation $4 plus 1 can of food
profits ao to world community food bank
ann arbor. mi
GET TICKET in ADVANCE of show!
Available at David's Bookstore-529 E. Liberty
and n the Michioan Union

Cambodia surrenders

An evening with
ORIGI NAL
COUNTRY MUSIC
with JAY STIELSTRA, guitar
and JOHN NORDINGER, piano
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
Friday, April 18
7:30
admission free

(Continued from Page 1)
calm. The people and the mili-
tary are welcoming the Khmer
Rouge," he said.
He iesaid fighting had stopped
in the city.
There were demonstrations in
the streets and people were
shouting, "We are Cambodi-
ans," Colonel Phuc Luc said.
"We do not want to kill each
other."
HE CONFIRMED that the in-
surgents had taken the capital's
Pochentong airport.
He said the Khmer Rouge had
not entered the military head-
quarters from which the radio
link was working.
"Our comrades are working
.. they let us work to the
end," he said.
ABOUT 50foreigners - jour-
nalists, relief workers and oth-
ers - were believed to be in
the Hotel Le Phnom, a neutral
zone last night.
Prince Sihanouk, titular head
of the insurgents, had earlier
rejected a ceasefire offer from
the Phnom Penh Administra-
tion. He has been in Peking
since March, 1970.
As word spread in Washington
yesterday, that the airport in
~ s

0

T

the Cambodian capital had fall-
en, Sen. John Sparkman, chair-
man of the Senate Foreign Ie-
lations Committee, issued a
statement on "the fall of Cam-
bodia."
"We must keep in mind that
Cambodia was not ours to have
and not ours to lose," the Alla-
bama Democrat said.
Five years of civil war devas-
tated Cambodia, leaving more
than half of its population home-
less, at least 13 per cent killed
or wounded and its agriculture
and small economy ravaged.
The conflict between govern-
ment troops and insurgents has
been one of the darkest chap-
ters in the country's long his-
tory.
IN NOVEMBER, 1953 inde-
pendence was granted and the
1954 Geneva accords on Indo-
china endorsed both indepen-
dence and neutrality for Cam-
bodia.
In 1955, Sihanouk, believing
his title restricted him from
wielding the power he felt nec-
essary to restore Cambodia to
its former glory, abdicated the
throne in favor of his father
and became a prince again.
In March 1970, while Sihanouk
was visiting Moscow, his own
rubber stamp legislators voted
him out as head of state and a
"government of national salva-
tion was formed.
Sihanoukflew on to Peking,
where he became head of a gov-
ernment in exile that gradually
absorbed various antigovern-
ment factions.
CHIEF among these factions;
were the Khmer Rouge - who
had fought a minor guerrilla
war against Sihanouk in thei
1950s and 1960s. The Khmer
Rouge eventually became the
battlefield umbrella organization
that commanded the warfare
aainst the government in '
Phnom Penh. Not all the rebels,
were regarded as Communists,,
but they were believed to have;
fought under the Communist
central command.
In less than two years the re-;
bels would claim control of 80
per cent of Cambodia.
In December 1970 the U. S.
Congress forbade U. S. combatI
troops or advisers in Cambodia.f
THE year 1971 began with
more reverses. A rebel attackI
on Phnom Penh's PochentongI
airfield destroyed three-quar-f
ters of the Khmer Republic'sI
air force on the ground. Lon
Nol, who had become premiert
on the resignation of Sirik Ma-c
tak, suffered a crippling stroke.I
In June, Sihanouk announcedi
that Khieu Samphan, a Paris-t
educated economist and old an-1
tagonist of the prince who hadi
gone underground four yearsf
before, was commander-in-chiefc
of the "Cambodian Peoples Lib-t
eration Armed Forces."
In 1972, Lon Nol proclaimed1
himself president, an act later ]
ratified by an election. With thet
1972 insurgent offensive in3

South Vietnam, the Vietnamese
Communist - led command ap-
parently turned its attention and
its troops to the east, and the
Khmer Rouge took over more
and more of the fighting.
BY 1973 the insurgents were
claiming 90 per cent of Cambo-
dian territory.
Efforts by the republic army
failed to secure supplies for
Phnom Penh, so in October a
U. S. civilian contract firm be-
gan an airlift
THE Khmer Rouge forces be-
gan their final push on January
1 this year. Phnom Penh's air-
port, the capital's only remain-
ing supply link, came under al-
most daily rocket attack. Civil-
ian casualties mounted.
Insurgents launched a fierce
attack on the strategic ferry
town of Neak Luong, the gov-
ernment's last major strong-
hold on the lower Mekong Riv-
er.
It fell on April 1 - the day
President Lon Nol left the coun-
try. Meanwhile, U. S. planes air-
lifted vital ammunition, rice and
fuel into the beleaguered capi-
tal.-
But the government position
continued to deteriorate, and on
April 12 - with the insurgents
almost at the city's gates,
American helicopters guarded
by U. S. Marines evacuated the
remaining American civilians.
McGee
freeing
attacked
(Continued from Page 1)
tifies incarceration," he direct-
ed his main attacks at the lack
of a "phase-in period" for the
law.
"THERE WAS too swift a
change in the courts Fromn an
attitude of iflstitutionalizati ya to
community treatment," Bulard
said.
According to Dr. Robey, the
Mental Health Laws were "per-
fectly good until the Supreme
Court made them unworkable."
He said that under the McQuil-
lan ruling "most of the evidence
from the Center was barred on
legal grounds."
Robey had filled out an "al-
ternative treatment form" in
compliance with the ruling in
which. he said that "there was
no possibility of any alternative
treatment for McGee" and that
he should be kept under "max-
imum security." However, the
form' was inadm ssable as evi-
dence and was never seen by
the jury.
WASHTENAW County
Prosecuting Attorney William
Delhey reluctantly referred to
the ruling as a "conflict of
law."
.I

Former
governor
watched
Tby feds
LANSING (UPI) - Michiga
Supreme Court Justice Joh;
Swainson, the target of briber
allegations by a convicte
burglar, has;been under investi
gation by federal authorities to
two years.
U. S. Attorney Ralph Gru
disclosed Tuesday that t h
probe by the Justice Depart
ment Strike Force in Detroi
began prior to a Dec. 19, 197.
Supreme Court ruling reversin
a breaking and entering convic
"tion against the man who ha
accused the former governor o
accepting the bribe.
BUT GUY cautioned that thi
is not cause to assume the i
vestigation is any broader i
scope.
Supreme Court Chief Jdstic
Thomas Kavanaugh announce
earlier T u e s d a y that th
court has retained prominen
Chicago attorney Albert Jenne
to "protect the court itself fron
the insinuations" of the briber
allegations.
"A charge such as this-eve
a charge made by a convicte
felon - poses a threat to th
court as an institution of gov
ernment," Kavanaugh said.
S WA INS 0 N, 49, a Demo
crat, served as, Michigan's go
ernor from 1960 to 1962 followin
a two-year term as lieuten
governor and four years in
state Senate. He was electe
to the Supreme Court in 1970.
Kavanaugh released a state
ment on the bribery allegation
at a news conference that als
was attended by Swainson.
Kavanaugh, contacted later
the day, was asked if Swainso
should resign because of th
.allegations. He replied: "Abs
lutely not."
Connally
..
tralgoes
'to jury
(Continued from Page1)
cumstantial evidence is strong
and he cited bank records, ap
pointment books and testimon
presented in the 2 weeks o
trial.
"ILLEGAL payments ,whe
made to public officials do n
occur in the presence of thir
parties, or cameras, or with
reporter present," he said.
Tuerkheimer told. the jury
five men and seven women thha
evidence, they will find Con
nally guilty.
Williams, lowering his voic
to a near whisper, said:
"I ASK you at long last t
lift the pain and anguish, os
tracism and suffering, false ac
cusations, vilification and slan
der from John Connally and i
you do, the United States wil
win the day."

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