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April 16, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-16

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Wednesday, April 16, 1975

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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'U'

dorm rates

AMERICA
Is Here
Brought To You By
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UAC, CONCERT CO-OP presents:

.r
in Big
By JAY LEVIN
For the first time in a long
while, Michigan's dorm rates
will not be the Big Ten's highest
next fall. That news, however,
fails to sweeten the burden of
paying what many believe to be
an unreasonable sum for a nor-
mal double room-a lofty $1400.
"I can see the rates rising in
a few years to the point where
nobody would want to live in the
dorms anymore," remarked
Housing Director John Feld-
kamp. Two thousand dollars, he
said, is a real possibility in the
near future.
MEANWHILE, several other
Big Ten schools will see their
rates increase next fall. Ohio
State will undergo the sharpest
rise when rates there take a
6.5% hike, reaching $1,464 per
year.
Elsewhere, Purdue's rates will
increase 6.4% to $1,297, Indiana,
the least expensive, will tack on
an extra $50 to its present $1,097
figure and Iowa remains un-
changed at $1,218. The other Big1
Ten schools have yet to an-
nornce their fall rates.
"No school is alike," said
Feldkamp, "and we don't go by<
other rates." Feldkamp views
such price races b e t w e e n
schools as "insignificant."
UNLIKE most of the Big Ten
dorm systems, the University's
does not provide linen service,
or serve breakfasts.
But, claims Feldkamp, the
dorm resident here gets more
food in two daily meals than
others get in three, because ofI
the dormitories' liberal re-serve
policy. f
He adds that the eliminationr
of the breakfast menu severalb
years ago saves each dorm resi-a

Fen; hik

topped Michigan family welcomes
Les seen Vetnamese child into home
By TOM PRESTON -verged at Chicago's O'Hare Airport Sunday
Special To The Daily morning.
HOLLY, Mich. - After two years of bu- "There were aboat 79 families there with
reaucratic hassles and seemingly endless us, and the atmosphere was euphoric," Mr.
paper work, Herb and Joyce Beskar have a Beskar commented. "After we'd waited so
new daughter. It isn't a typical adoption, long, it was finally going to happen"
however, because the child is Vietnamese. When asked why they had adopted a Viet-
"We called the adoption agency we'd been namese child, Ms. Beskar said, "There was
working through about three weeks ago, when really very little political motivation or guilt
it looked like South Vietnam was going to feeling involved. We'd always wanted to
fall out of Thieu's hands," said Ms. Beskar. adopt another child." (The Beskars first chld
"We knew that something was bound to wias also adopted).
happen, so we asked them what the chances
were of the girl we'd chosen flying out of HOWEVER, her husband indicated concern
Saigon and they told us it would be sometime over "the way the United States government
rn May." has handled this thing.
"We're beginning to question their motives
TO THE surprise of everyone involved, in dealing with Vietnamese orphans so late.
things began to move more quickly than had When we started going through adoption pro-
been anticipated. The couple was notified cedures about two years ago, the U. S.
Thursday, April 3, that eight-month-old Tran couldn't have cared less about refugees or
Thai Nga would probably leave Saigon the orphans, and now there's this big, highly pub-
next morning. licized operation.
The following day, however, the Beskars "if we had had a choice we would have
were shocked when they saw a television preferred that our child be adopted by Viet-
:, newscast of the tragic accident that struck namese relatives, but there were none," he
an American C-5A transport plane carrying added, referring to the fact that many Vietna-
254 orphans out of Saigon. mese object to the baby airlift.
"We were horrified," said Ms. Beskar of
the crash in which over half the children THE SMILING, new member of the family,
were killed. "It was a terrible kind of warn- renamed Lisa Thai Beskar, has obviously
,ainp ing. Fortunately the Holt Agency called us made a good adjustment to her new situa-
with an assurance that the baby hadn't been tion, and seems very happy.
food and labor." on that plane, that she was due to leave The beaming father commented, "After all
Saigon around noon that day. . that trouble, I wouldn't hesitate to do itJ
A R E P R T compiled Last TECOUPLE and their adopted child con againItwas definitely worth it." d
year by Claude Orr, the late ywrhi
associate director of financng, . ...::. .. . ..... ....:... ..
prices in dormitory supplies f'or
the high dorm fees. Brown U' students protest
The report also cited the fact
that the University, unlike such
schools as Indiana, employs a1"
unionized dorm staff who asrdanep-v cutbacks in linassive. str ike
higher pay than a non-K1RS
unionized staff would.

1

Feldk

JESSE COLIN YOUNG
and LEO KOTTKE
WED., May 21 H I LL AU D., 8 p.m.
INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIAL
Reserved Seats $5, $4.50, $4, co on sale today UM Box
Office, 10:30-5:30 daily
ticket info. 763-4553 Sorry, no personal checks
Smoking & beverages not permitted in auditorium
Tickets will still be available for JACKSON
BROWNE and PHOEBE STONE concert this
Sat. night.

dent about $50 a year. And, he
says, when dormitories did offer
a morning meal, less than half
of their populace took advan-
tage of the service.
"WE'D be more than happy]
to restore linen service," said
Feldkamp, but he fears that,
for the most part, the services
would not be used by a large
portion of the students.
And the benefits of dorm lv-
ing, according to Feldkamn, are,
rounded out by a dormitory li-
brary service which is "prob-
ably the best one of its Kind in;
the country."
Feldkamp, in part, blames!
rising utility costs for recenti
hikes in dorm rates. "ForI
years," he remarked, there was
no increase in utility rates, And
all we had to worry about was"

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Still a very
special game
at a very
special place.
BILLIARDS
at the UNION

t
T
S
r

A plan, outlined in the report,
called for the establishment of
a large dining facility to serve
all the residents of the "hill
area" dormitories. The imple-
mentation of this common eat-
ing area would save each stu-
dent an estimated $45.
Exessive vandalism was also
cited in the retort as a signifi-
cant cost factor.

1 By DAVID WHITING
Brown University, in Prov
dente, Rhode Island, was tor
apart yesterday with the fir.
day of a massive student strik
protesting the Administration
plan to drastically cut stude
services and fire some 75 fa
ulty members over the ne
three years.
While over half of the 5,2
undergrads voted for the stril
only 5 p e r c e n t reported

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SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY OF THE SUN

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F
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- A Capsule Report by the
Michigan Pharmaceutical
Association
- -
Pinning down facts about ; Pharmacy Facts
Michigan'S generic drug law and hoW it Michigan Pharmacy (MP) is
moproud to present this educa-
wny save you i8no ey on pwscrlpt:ons. ion program known as
Pharmacy Facts. Pharmacy
Pharmacists and consumer groups championed this law which : Facts will examine andi ex-
was designed to aid you, the consumer. As a public service. the :pose t he issues which can as-
Michigan Pharmaceutical Association presents this information. sist you as a consumer of
: health services, particularly
What's a generic drug? prescription or pharmacy
:services.
its a drug or medication that is produced by : dlegeaweffect Ma-nerch
more than one manufacturer, such as penicillin . 31, was championed by the
or aspirin. Most often these generic drugs of Michigan <harnaceutical
identical chemical composition are distributed : Association and a consumer
under a multitude of different brand names. coalition. Pharmacy was first
: to identily it as a public and
U * What does this law mean to you? : a professional issue in 1970.
I'[here exists countless
If there is a cost difference between "brand brands of the same drug ...
name" drugs, the law permits your pharmacist to a those a proucts
select and dispense the "lower cost, quality o purchase, many varying
brand' (unless your physician insists on a par- - owever, you cannot know
ticular brand). Savings from this service by your ; all of the many different
pharmacist are passed on to you.-" brands and manufacturers
" of inedications - and in
Does this mean you will NOT get the : many cases neither can your
s doctor - nor the varying
medicine your doctor prescribes? prices and the therapeutl
data. hs is your
L M f No._The law still requires the pharmacist to dis- ; pharmacist's role.
pense only a quality medication as prescribed. Now your pharmacist's spe-
You get the prescription your doctor specifies. : cial knowledge can work for
" you iii sele:ting the exact
drug prescribed and, for the
Will all prescriptions be cheaper? - first tuie, the quality brand
:which is also the most economi-
Not always. Many prescription drugs are only cal.
made by one manufacturer, and the pharmacist : Future Issues & Topics
has no control over the manufacturer's price. Future Pharmacy Facts
" editions will deal with other
Do'brand'drugs and generic drugs look alike?:.h ar impor-
Q0 g "tant to you. NIPA asks your
- hel p - do you have questions
Not necessarily. In certain instances adifference :for PIAR MACY FACTS?
., in appearance may be noted. Your pharmacist T'he state association, work-
will counsel you accordingly. The best pharmacy : ing in cooperation with loc-
care is based on communications, confidence : als and regionals, has com-
and complete information about your medica- : mittees to answer your ques-
tion therapy. * tions.
" Send that question to:
Now, here's how to take advantage of this law. n MPA, 1812 Michigan Na-
Consult your pharmacist who is most qualified to make rational Th e rmisn
"drug product selection" decisions for you. The PharmaCist
And remember, continued "shopping around" when it comes to 'T'ake advantage of the
nrecrintion servir scn he hazardous to vour health. Select a . most readily accessible

SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY OF THE SUN
PRESENTS
DICK GREGO~hRY
Speakinq on the food crisis and survival of humanity *
FRI., MAY 16, 1975-7:00 P.M.
UNIV. OF MICH. BALLROOM
Donation $4 plus 1 can of food
profits ao to world community food bank
ann arbor, mi
GET T!CKET in ADVANCE of show!
Available at David's Bookstore-529 E. Liberty
and n the Michigan Union

if
you
see
news

ishowed up for class yesterday, this week since the budget wil
vi crippling the University. be submitted to the 'Board o.
.rn Trustees Saturday for final ap
'st TH STIEhsbebrw proval. At that time student
ke ing since February when the will decide whether or not t<
's Administration announced a continue the strike.
nt proposed budget with the severe Kathy ten Kate, a strike co.
cutbacks.o
cybk d, ordinator. stated, 'At this poin
xt By mid - March some 2,500 it's not clear if we will contin
students staged a massive rally tie the strike, we'll see what the
blasting the Administration's Administration does and submit
ke proposals and drew up a list of{ another strike decision to stu.
fl demands which include: dent referendum."
lY 0 Students have greater input She indicated that if the rai
on the budget and be allowed to budget is released the strike will
review raw budget figures; probably end.
O Present health services, which THE MOVE to strike was a
face a cutback, be maintained; hot issue on campus with some
S The number of faculty not 68 per cent of the undergraduat-
be decreased; es turning out for the strike vote
* The number of black students Monday. In contrast, past stu-
be maintained at the current 10 (lent referendums have only at-
percent level or be increased; tracted about 17 per cent 01
and the undergraduates.
There was obvious support for
$5 million be added to the the strike with about 78 per-
$3 million financial aid budget. cent of the voting students sup-
University President Donald nnrting the move to boycott
'Horenick has consistantly re- classe
fused to release the raw budget Ten Kate was pleased with the
figures-considered by many to rike's nronress declaring, "We
be the najor impetus for the have incredible support it's
ffinal decision to strike. kaveidf'nredibe7suppoevrthings
kind of ir-bilievahle: everything
is going very well."
HOWEVER, the strike is only
planned to last until the end of crASSwS were nicketed yes.

7
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happen

call

76-DAILY

1

Reminder to Advertisers:
Our last day of publication this term
will be Sunday, April 20. The deadline
will be Wednesday, April 16, at 5 p.m.
The Summer Daily will start publication
again on Wednesday, May 7.

t-rday with no violent incidenc-
es.
Richard Landau, a junior at
Pgrown, commented, "An under-
lying reason behind the strike
is to dump Hornick. He is an
incomnetent administrator. No-
body 1ikes the man except the
Administration, even the faculty
hate him.
The last strike at Brown was
in protest of the Cambodian in-
vasion in the spring of 1972.
That boycott received substani
tially less support than the pre-
sent strike.

Graduating Seniors

I

[

Know
sports

how you con keep
after you graduate?

your eye on U-M

I

JOIN THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
and read about it in every month's
Michigan Alumnus Magazine
AS A MEMBER OF THE ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION, YOU WILL:
-6 Receive 10 issues a year of the Michigan Alumnus
Moagazine which carries campus news, sports
and features
t Be able to place a free, one-time classified ad for
employment in the Michigan Alumnus Magazine
r Take advantage of discount prices on guality
merchandise bearing the U-M insignia
Be eligible for the Association's numerous travel
opportunities and its eniovable family camping
program
> Be able to take advantage of a proposed, low-cost
group life insurance plan for Association members
and their families
Be helping support student scholarships, emergency
student aid, a women's administrative internship
and other needed programs
SPECIAL HALF-PRICE MEMBERSHIP OFFER to graduating
seniors: Seniors who ioin the Alumni Association prior to
commencement can take out a 5-year membership for only
$25. (a reqular 1-year membership is $10)
MAIL CHECKS TO: U-M Alumni Association,
Michigan.Union, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

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When you ask musicians who the best

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