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January 17, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-17

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, Jonuory 17, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, January 17, 1975

I-

b I

REGENC
HAS

TRAVEL

IIRA
resumes
(Continued from Page 1)
-in addition to a shotgun
30 cartridges, the army said

Internal commission fights
greet chairwoman MAurray

By ANN MARIE LIPINSKI

board are from Ann Ar

MOYE

I

Come visit our new location at

61

E.

WILLIAM-

CORNER OF WILLIAM & MAYNARD
To celebrate we will be holding an
OPEN HOUSE TODAY,
Friday, Jan. 17, 9-5 p.m.
with FREE ORCHIDS
FLOWN FRESH FROM HAWAII BY UNITED
AIRLINES TO OUR FIRST 500 VISITORS
Let us tell you about Aloha Hawaii
"White Sands" package from $454

50% OFF
Handmade Sheepskin
Coats for Men, Women
& Children
CAR COAT
REG. $150
NOW $69
JACKET
REG. $120
NOW $59
OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK

WHEN THE IRA announ
earlier yesterday it would
extend the cease-fire, auth
ties in London alerted po
and special b o m b squ
throughout England and'
creased guards at public bt
ings.
Government officials said t
expected the IRA to unlas
bomb attack in England ra
than Northern Ireland,
Scotland Yard has drafted
plans to meet the anticipe
onslaught.
Protestant militants in P
thern Ireland, who have1
tied with bombs and bullets
wvell as the IRA, were prepai
for renewed warfare.
A LEADER of the Ulster
fense Association said the
decision to end the truce w
reunify Protestant milita
"The IRA says their camps
is against the British gov
ment and army," he said,"
if bombing and shooting ret
to Protestant areas, we s
take effective action."
Sectarian violence has cla
ed well over 1,140 lives in
past 5 years in Northern
land. Fifty-one persons h
been killed by operations
England attributed to the IR

Washtenaw County Commis- wards.
sioner Meri Lou Murray may Jay Bradbury (R-Ann Arb
face stiff opposition from a was appointed vice chairn
board stymied by internal po- in the same board meetingt
and litical conflict during her term saw Murray elected.
J. as the board's first chairwoman. WALTER maintainedt
Several commissioners last one unnamed commissi
rced night expressed strong doubt "insinuated that the Ann Ar
not that Murray would be able to Republicans favored her e
ori- unite the Ann Arbor and Ypsi- tion because of what she co
lice lanti factions on the board -- a do for them."
cads problem which has seriously However, Murray denied
in- hampered their decision making allegation, and vowedt
wild- strength in the past. "there was never any deal
"I CERTAINLY have reserva- acted."
they tions," commented Commission- Alan Toth, former board c
h a er James Walter on Murray's mission chairman who resig
they ability to bring the board to- in June 1974, said, "I gu
and gether. "Presently, I'm very she'll be able to get the
new concerned with the kind of re- done, depending on what
ated lationships she had with Re- call the job. She's capable.
publicans in forming the coali- and she can be just as h
Nor- tion that had Jay Bradbury nosed and bitter in her r
bat- elected as vice chairman." tions with certain other c
sas The only Republicans on the I missioners as anybody."
ring
De- fund cut

rbor
bor)
man
that
that
:ner
rbor
elec-
ould
the
that
ex-
om-
gned
uess
job
you
ard-
ela-
om-

BUT

HE maintained

that

Murray "cannot categorically"
sew the split board together.
"There's no way they can cre-
ate harmony," he added.
Commissioner Tilden Stumbc
(D-Ypsilanti) described Murray
as a "very ambitious, but also
an occasionally ruthless politi-
cian. The big question now i
who will she appoint to the comr
mittee head positions," he said
Murray, who according to sta
tute must appoint committet
heads by January 25, ten day.
from the date of her election tt
the board chair seat, maintain
that she has not come to a fina
decision regarding the appoint
ments. But she has acknowl-
edged that, "It's quite possible
there will be Republican com-
mittee heads."
j ONE DEMOCRAT active in lo
cal politics agreed that although
the handling of appointments
will be adsticky issue for Mur
ray, it is only symptomatic of
larger problem underlying al
board activities.
"Ann Arbor looks down their
nose in a lot of ways at Ypsi-
lanti," the activist said. "It
looks at Ypsilanti with a large
dose of snobbery. This is a
problem carried over to board
activities, and I don't know if
anyone can bring that group to-
gether. Maybe Murray can, but
it's kind of doubtful."

F'.

Pe rsian

i

HOUSE OF IMPORTS
320 E. LIBERTY
769-8555

IRA
ould
rnts.
aign
,ern-
'but
turn
hall
aim-
the
Ire-
iave
in
A.

II

- -I
NOWk
Free DelIvery
HRS: 4:30 p.m.-1 a.m.
LARGE ORDER ANY TIME
PIZZA PARK
(formerly Pizza
Loy's Double D)
0 Deep Sicilian
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0 Any kind
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* 6 foot party sub
0 100 different
submarines
0 breakfast anytime
(7 a.m.-9 a.m. special price)
With this ad SAVE
50c medium, 60clarge
663-7721
Why pay more?
333 E. HURON
NEXT TO CITY HALL

(Continued from Page 1)
letter to expect at least four
per cent cut in state appropria-
tions to the University for theI
1975-76 fiscal year.
Milliken warned Fleming to
"assume that tuition increases
and enrollment decreases are
not viable alternatives" to make
up revenues lost, if state ap-
propriations for the Univer-
sity's Ann Arbor Campus are
slashed from this year's $105.5
million to next year's projected
$101.3 million.
The governor argued in the
letter that an increase in tui-
tion would, in effect, amount
to an increase in taxes, which
he opposes.
NEVERTHELESS,
Fleming has said he won't rule
out a new tuition increase for
next year - except "as a last
resort."i
Although the governor has not
yet made his final public recom-
mendations on next year's state
appropriations to the Univer-
sity, Fleming says the gover-
Somethi ng
NEW
IS
COMING
TO
W103 FM

nor's budget is expected "with-
in a few weeks."
On Monday, Acting Literary
College Dean Billy Frye said
that all vacant faculty positions
in the College would remain
frozen, at least until Rhodes
and the Budget Priorities Com-
mittee make final recommen-
dations.

Demns oust key chairmen

(Continued from Page 1)
chairpersons to be selected on
their length of service, with thes
member of the majority party
who has served on the commit-
tee longest becoming its chair-
person.
For more than half a century,
the real power in the House
were committee chairmen who
acted like potent dukes in a
weak kingdom.
THE REFORM movement
was bolstered by the influx of
75 new members, most of them
young and liberal and anxious
to change the old order.
Some members had felt that
Hebert was arrogant and arbi-
trary in his handling of the
committee. Common Cause, a
self-styled citizens' lobby, said
in a recent report that Hebert
flagrantly violated widely ac-
cepted standards of conduct.
It also charged that he stack-
ed key subcommittees with sen-
ior members who agreed with
him philosophically, rewarding
I allies and punishing those who

disagreed.
AT A PRESS conference, the
74 - year - old veteran Con
gressman vowed to fight the
caucus decision on the House
floor.
Poage also has been a long-
time target of liberal Demo-
crats. Common Cause accuses
him of being arbitrary 'an
abusive with committee me
bers.

I

Al Capone's
Birthday Sale?'
It's a well-known fact
that Al Capone loved music.
People'still reminisce about
his habit of carrying a violin
case around all the time. He
especially liked instrumen-
tals (because hearing men
"sing" made him nervous).
Besides, Tech Hifi looks for
any excuse to offer you
famous name hifi com-
ponents at criminally-low
sale prices. And that's the
way Al would have wanted
it.
We offer
"protection:'
Every recommended
music system Tech Hifi
sells is covered by our four-.
teen customer satisfaction
guarantees. Important
guarantees like a one-year
speaker trial, ninety-day
100% trade-in, and a
seven-day money-back
guarantee.
Come in and ask for a
free copy of the 1975 Tech
Hifi Buyer's Guide (usually
$1.00). It has all the guar-
antees spelled out clearly.
Save '106 on this
stereo system.
Save $106 on a great-
sounding system featuring a
Kenwood 2400 am/fm stereo
receiver, two Ohm E loud-
speakers and a Pioneer PL 10
belt-drive turntable with
base, dustcover and an ADC
90 Q induced-magnetic
cartridge. $A
This week only: 41

It would be a
crime to miss
savings like these.
Pictured below is just one
of the systems on special
sale for this occasion. It
represents a deal you can't
refuse if you're holding out
for the best-sounding music
system you can get for your
money. Other complete sale
systems start as low as $139.
Birthday sale prices will
. be in effect all week, from
January 13 thru 18. And on
January 17, (Al Capone's birth
date), all Tech Hifi storks
will have birthday cake for
you. Come early if you want
a piece of the action.

Shop by mail and
avoid The Mob.
1 Our stores are sure to be mobbed I
I during this week-long sale. You I
* can avoid the crowd with this 3
*MONEYBACK GUARANTEE
mail-order coupon. We'll pay for g
delivery!
* D check enclosed for $419 3
* (please add your local
* sales tax)
I [ Charge to my Mastercharge
*s No . yBank___ercard
I or to my BankAmericard *

E'

I No.
NAME
* ADDRESS
ISTATE ZIP___
Mail to: Tech Hifi, Mail Order 3
3 48 Teed Drive
I MD Randolph, Mass. 02368
16 ..a.u. - I

I

ATTENTIGI

tech hifi
Quality Components at the Right Peice

DO .YOU KNOW
WHERE YOU'RE LIVING
N EXT YEAR?
MICHIGAN'S FRATERNITIES HAVE
SOMETHING SPECIAL'
TO OFFER YOU
Twenty home-cooked meals each week. Opportunities for social
interaction with members of both sexes from within AND outside
of fraternities and sororities. Atmosphere conducive to s t u d y
aided by the diversity of students I i v i n g in the houses which
makes academic assistance readily available. Recreational facili-
ties and participation in all intramural sports. The challenges and
rewards of actively participating in all phases of the management
of your own group living situation. All these advantages are avail-
able at a price comparable to the dorm. We urge you to come out
and take a look at our homes-we'll be glad to meet you at the
door and show you how we live.
Representatives of the Fraternity Coordinating Council will be in the
following dorms on January 20 & 21 during the dinner hour to answer
ww.: w..w ww ..w r 4w.w rwwr rwi. ri.iwrw ii L.. iw.i . -

I

...
?"F%:i":?:l.: :' :9r?"f: :Y,.?v f.SY :::crii'r "$:ii{{r.,:: $'fG:i:: R;!41+ :}X:iin$L'+:^., :>R{::>:: : t ?:

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