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April 10, 1975 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-10

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Thursday, April 10, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

I

SPRING FOOTBALL CONTINUES

Injuries

plague drills

By RICH LERNER I
With only seven spring prac-I
tices remaining, Michigan foot-
ball coach Bo Schembechler is
disappointed with the manner
in which his offense is shaping
up.
"Our offense has not looked
good," Schembechler said, "not
anyone has been a standout." .
Schembechler fingered injury;
as the main source for the cause'
of his displeasure. Nine offen-
sive players are out for the
whole of spring practice, in ad-
dition to assorted minor in-
juries.
In the major position chan-
ges of the spring sessions,
Schembechler has transferred
Jim Smith from split end to
wingback. Smith caught 21
passes in the 1A'll and aver-
aged over 18 yards per recep-
tion.
"We can get more out of
Jimmy at wingback," Schem-
bechler said.

Schembechler denied that theI
move will necessarily mean a,
more wide-open attack. "He
can be a blocker," Bo assured,
"he's 6-3 and 190 pounds."
The switch was necessitated
by the graduation of last au-,
tumn's starter Gil Chapman.
In addition, Chapman's back-up
last fall, Jim Pickens, has
moved to the defensive back-
field, leaving no one to play
wingback. Max Richardson1
moves with Smith to the slot,
providing capable depth. Rich-t
ardson ran superbly in cameo
appearances at tailback last
fall.
Quarterback Mark Elzinga
has returned to practice after
missing a week with a rib
iniury that severely hamper-
ed his development this
spring. Schembechler said he
would not rate Elzinga a bet-
ter passer than Dennis Frank-
lin, and he must still discover
Elzinga's strengths.

"No law
freshman,"
phasized."
I will, but n
Foremost
freshmen qu
are Ricky L
western, an
Richard Ca
Jersey.
Possible 1
back includ
Ceddia, and
fer Rob Ca
Gordon B
have continu
back posit
watched y
because of
their steadv
Smith andJ
Bell and L
duties last3
1850 yardsj
back is the
tion to be
from last y
At fullba

says I can't start a the only candidate for a start-
Schembechler em- ing spot who is not disabled.
That doesn't mean Both Kevin King and Phil An-
io law says I can't." drews are hobbled, and out
among the incoming for the remainder of prac-
uarterback prospects tice. Corbin, a blockbusting
leach of Flint South- bruiser, ran well last fall. ...
d Stacy Johnson and With Smith moved to wing-
mpbell, both of New back, the split end position fell
into the experienced hands of
back-ups at quarter- Keith Johnson. A junior from
e Roger Bettis, Jon Munster, Indiana, Johnson has
junior college trans- started games in the past. Jerry
rrion. Collins has returned to work-
3ell and Rob Lytle outs from the injured list and
ued to share the tail- provides Johnson with competi-
ion, however both tion.
esterday's practice Cager Ricky White has been
injuries. Running in working out at tight end, but
were freshmen Mike
Joe Holland. i yesterday Schembechler experi-
Jytle haed.mented with White at split end.
~ytle shared tailback' Thepemnnefthsmv
year to the tune of .. permanence of this move
rushing. Thus, tail- is uncertain.
only backfield posi- The tight end situation re-
filled by a' starter mains to be ironed out. Present-
aear.ily, George Przygodski runs
ck, Scott Corbin is first, ahead of White and
+ freshman Dave Harding. John
Anderson, a tight end last year,
has been transferred to defen-
sive end, so Schembechler has
tabbed the tight end spot as one
position in which an incoming
freshmanmay see action.
With Franklin, Chapman, and
Chuck Heater all departed, the
backfield will definitely feature
some new faces in the fall.
practce an theHowever, the presence of Smith,
practice and the Johnson, Bell and Lytle will in-
among the team, sure some degree of familiarity.
turn, improves our
n to several experi- LO VE SCORES 38
shmen, the team
e returning starters 0

7

.V7*.~

Volleyball team s
midwest club trod

Doily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
QUARTERBACK Mark Elzinga (16) pitches out during spring
football drills while an unidentified defensive player attempts
to break up the play. Elzinga finally returned to practice
thin cx~a~r aftn. m oei~r 1 . - I -'

By AL HRAPSKY
While winter sports have end-
ed, and the fervor of another
baseball season is setting in, one
lesser known sport, volleyball,
is rising to its seasonal peak.
The Michigan Men's Power
volleyball club will travel to
Wheaton, Illinois this Saturday
for the Midwest Intercollegiate;
Volleyball Association (MIVA)
club-sport playoffs; a grueling
16 hours of competition that
tests the stamina as well as
abilities of a team.
THE WOLVERINES
are currently atop the Eastern
Division of the MIVA with a
13-0 dual-match record, but
Michigan State is close behind
at 12-1. Saturday matches will
tell the story, however, as these
records merely determine which
teams will compete against one

another in the opening round.
O b e r l i n College, Toledo,
Wayne State, Ohio, and Kellogg
Community College round out
the Eastern Division. Purdue,
Northwestern, W i s c o n s i n,
Illinois State, Western Illinois,
and Wheaton comprise the West-
ern Division.
Team captain Jan Stannard,
who has assumed the roles of
coach, organizer and player this
year, said that defending cham-
pion Purdue, and also Michigan
State, will offer the stiffest op-
position.
STANNARD ADDMD,
however, that a strong finish'
in the playoffs last year, and
experience, qualifies Michigan
as one of the teams to beat.
"This year we have people
who have been around the game
a lot more," he said. "This im-

proves our
competition
which, in
play."
In additio
enced fres
boasts three

tis weenuarter missing last
injury.

-0

1FSports o TeDaily
Gal netters open
The Women's. Tennis Team opens its second intercollegiate
season with a.home match against Henry Ford Community Col-
lege tomorrow, at 3 p.m.
The results should be interesting, since the two teams
have never met before. Michigan coach Carmen Brummet
is optimistic about her team's chances. "We have five
women who are top quality, and they are all very close in
caliber," she said.

-Rostivk Storozuk, Gary Cas-
key and Stannard.
Although Michigan's chances
for a championship look good,
the absence of operating funds,
the lack of a full-time, paid
coach and difficulties in arrang-'
ing for proper facilities, have
plagued the team.
"T E A M S LIKE Toledo,
Oberlin, Purdue, and MSU haveI
facilities where they can prac-
tice regularly," Stannard said.
"We're often pre-empted by
IM basketball and other activi-
ties (at the IntramuralsBuild-
ing). Not having an isolated'
place to practice hinders con-
centration and communication
on the court."
Last year's coach, Sandy
Vong, who was forced into tak-
ing a backseat this season due
to a lack of time, analyzed the
team's abilities.
"At times they're awfully
brilliantkbut then sometimes
they make a lot of mistakes,"~
he offered. "But I think our
ability and depth gives us the
best team."
"We're highly offensive
minded and have a series of
quick sets and hits," V o n g
added. "If we executetto per-
fection, we could win it.

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - Chicago's Bob'
Love fired in 38 points and hisi
teammates held Kansas City's
Nate Archibald to 12 at the
Bulls gained a 95-89 victory overa
the Kings last night in the open-
er of their National BasketballI
Association playoff series. I
The best-of-seven series re-I
sumes Sunday afternoon at Kan-
sas City.
With Love blazing away,
Billboard
At least five members of
Michigan's 1974 co-champion
Big Ten football team have
consented to take on the dar-
ing faculty of Ann Arbor's
Huron High School tomorrow
night, 7:30 p.m., at that
school in order to raise money
for Huron's athletic depart-
ment. Last year the gridders
soundly defeated that return-
ing lineup 72-60.
Wildcats

Bulls

dump
the Bulls led by as many as
14 points. The Kings' swift
little Archibald was handcuff-
ed to well below his 25.6 sea-
son average, mainly under theI
tight guarding of Norm Van
Lier.
Despite Archibald's c o 1 d
shooting, the Kings bouncedl
back from a poor first half and'
came within 63-62 late in the
third quarter. They were
threatening in the fourth quar-
ter before Love and Van Lier
popped in six quick points,
clinching the victory.

But then Love hit a field goal
and Van Lier sank a pair of
free throws with 12 seconds
left. Van Lier made two more
free throws with only two sec-
onds remaining.
It was the first opening
game victory by the Bulls in
their playoff history.
Larry McNeill carried the
brunt of the Kings' attack,
scoring 22 points before fouling
out with 3:37 left in the game.

weeks practice with a rib
Kings
With less than two minutes
left, the Kings trailed only 89-
87.!

"r"
77
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Apartments offers
EIGHT MONTH FALL/WINTER LEASES
TWO/FOUR MONTH SPRING/$UMMER LEASES
f Free weekly housekeeping
" Study room
" Piano room
i Heated Pool
" Laundry Facilities
! Recreation room
" Located 2 blocks from the Ding

Looking for an Educational Summer
Experience Working with
Handicapped Children?
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
FRESH AIR CAMP
Still has Counselor openings
Applications are available in Room 2010M
School of Education Bldg. or call for informa-
tion: 764-6364.
Also a Truck Driver Position is Available

}S T A N N A RgD AGED
Tomorrow's starters include Diane Czarnecki, Jan Karzen,
Janet Wilson, Annette Zahaross, Missy Pollick and Andy Laffey with Vong,sti hatconsis-
tency would be the key on Sat- l n
who will compete in six singles and three doubles. urday.
Before wrapping up the season with the Big Ten Tourna- "Volleyball is becoming a
ment in Madison, the netters will also challenge Kalamazoo, more sophisticated snort as far Ca gers
Hillsdale, Wisconsin and Wayne State. as the offenses and defenses
--MARYBETH DILLON go and it's more difficult to
11 tget players to adjust to them," LEXINGTON, K
Hoosiers, nruins to ctasn the captain said. ' University of Kent
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.-Indiana, ranked No. 1 most of this '. "Gettingr ow our es o d- up ient th NCpastAb
past college basketball season, and UCLA's national champions where they're supposed to be overcome the grad
will meet at St. Louis Nov. 29. on the court, has been one of of its top performe
Coach Bobby Knight announced the game Tuesday night our biggest problems." three prospective f
at the IU basketball awards banquet. terday.
The Hoosiers, whose 34-game winning string was broken by !_ION THE FIRST
Kentucky, 92-90, in the NCAA Mideast regional at Dayton, Ohi., ~ -_.d-- tional letters of in
last month, finished the season 31-1. S C 0 R E S sined, Kentucky

prep

536 S. FOREST

761-2.680

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF

i t

y. (A') - The
tacky, runner-
sketball tour-
season, helped
duation of six
rs, by signing
freshmen yes-
day that na-
tent could be
added to its

a

M,

9

-AP

'Dire Due' Duerod picks U-D NBA PLAYOFFS
Chicago 95, Kansas City 89
DEARBORN-All-State forward Terry Duerod of Class A ABA PLAYOFFS
state champion Highland Park has signed a national letter of St. Louis 115, New York 97
Denver 128, Utah 122
intent to enroll at the University of Detroit next fall, the Titans WHA PLAYOFFS
announced last night. Minnesota 6, New England 5
The 6-foot-2 Duerod, who will have to play guard at college IwaukeR 7, NEAGUE
due to his height, averaged 27.1 points per game for Highland Minnesota 3, Texas 2
Park NATIONAL LEAGUE
PkSt. Louis 4, Montreal 0
The Titans said he chose them over Cincinnati, Arizona, and Cincinnati 4, Los Angeles 3
North Carolina State. Houston 14, Atlanta 2
LACROSSE
--UPI Michigan 7, Ohio State 5

roster Hill Willoughby of Eng-
lewood, N.J., Bob Fowler of
Dearborn Heights, and Pat Fos-
chi of Virginia, Minn.
The trio represents a com-
bined average of 82 points end
52 rebounds per game. I
Willoughby, a 6-8 forward, av-
eraged 31.6 points, 17 rebounds,
and 6 blocked shots last season.
Fowler, at 6-6, averaged 28
points and 16 rebounds, while
Foschi at 6-4, averaged 23
points, 19 rebounds and 12,
assists last year.
S,
y

(Continued from Page 6)
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