100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 08, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, April 8, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

Page Three

I

i

News Briefs
From Wire Service Reports
Belfast blues
BELFAST, Northern Ireland (A)-A car bomb exploded last
night outside a bar in the Roman Catholic Oldpark area of Bel-
fast, injuring three people, police reported.
When police arrived at the tavern they were met by a stone-
throwing mob and withdrew, a police spokesman said. Ambu-
lances managed to take the injured to a hospital where one man
'in his late twenties was described in serious condition. His mother
and another man were also hurt, officials said.
In the Catholic Twinbrook area, police said two youths burst
into a band practice at an ex-servicemen's club and fired two
shots at young musicians. No one was hit.
Police and troop patrols were strengthened Monday after a
weekend of bombings and shootings that left 11 persons dead and
at least 80 wounded.
Radical arraigned
PHILADELPHIA {M)-Susan Edith Saxe, who had been on the
FBI's 10 most wanted list for 4 years before her capture 12
days ago, pleaded innocent today to bank robbery and conspiracy
charges.
The 26-year-old self-styled revolutionary was arrested on a
downtown Philadelphia street March 27 and ordered held on
$350,000 bail. She was arraigned in a heavily guarded courtroom
before U.S. Magistrate Tullio Gene Leomporra.
Miss Saxe is accused here of the Sept. 1, 1970, robbery of the
Bells Savings and Loan Association.
She also is charged with murder and armed robbery in Boston
in connection with the slaying of a policeman during a Sept. 23,
1970, bank holdup that netted $26,000.
Grad study lounge
bans under grads

Stale Vitamin C
found dangerous

AP Photo
ATTORNEY EDWARD BENNETT Williams, left, and his client John Connally arrive at U.S.
District Court in Washington yesterday. Connally is on trial there for accepting bribes.

Lawyer tries to
Connally's chief

smear

PIHILADELPHIA ((R))-Vita-
min C tablets kept in the kitch-
en or bathroom for a year de-
grade into harmful substances,
a biochemist told the American
Chemical Society yesterday.
"Vitamin C is stable in the
pure state, when kept away
from moisture and oxygen, the
researcher s a i d. "However,
once a container has been open-
ed, and is used frequently, de-
gradation sets in."
"MOST PEOPLE keep a big
bottle of Vitamin C tablets in
the bathroom or the kitchen for
a year or more. There the lev-
els of humidity and temperature
are high and the degradation of
the vitamin is rapid."
Wilk said he analyzed com-
mercial Vitamin C tablets with
a potency of 100 milligrams. The
actual Vitamin C, ascorbic acid,
made up only a fourth of the
tablets, whichrweighed 400 mil-
ligrams. The remaining 300 mil-
ligrams was filler, a combina-
tion of sugar, lactose, starch,
dextrin, talc and magnesium
stearate.
In the process of degrading,
Wilk said Vitamin C breaks
down into two sugar compounds.
With these by-products and the
THE MICHIGAN DAIJY
Volume LXXXV, No. 150
Tuesday, April 8, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i11 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
l Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

- tnsrin &11. filler Wilk wYV cail~A

Niia m e nuer, n arrieu
diabetics not to take large quan-
tities of Vitamin C.
The ascorbic acid finally de-
grades into a toxic substance
called oxalic acid, something
that is thought to cause urinary
infections and accelerate the
formation of kidney stones, Wilk
said.
The biochemist said he bought
bottles of Vitamin C from a
local drugestore and kept one
in a refrigerator and the other
at room temperature. Over the
course of a year, he said he
picked out a few tablets at a
time and subjected them to
chemical analysis.
After 360 days, he said, he
found that only 54 per cent of
the ascorbic acid in tablets
stored in the refrigerator re-
mained in pure form, on the
shelf the degradation was more
rapid.
Saudi Arabia, 517,800 square
miles in area, occupies most of
the Arabian Peninsula.

SATURDAY, APRIL 19
HILL AUD. 8 P.M.
Good Seats Still Available
$6.00, $5.50,
$5.00, $4.50
At UM Union
10:30-5:30 Daily
2-5 p.m. Sat.
(763-4553)
SORRY, NO PERSONAL
CHECKS
Smokinq and beverages not
permitted in auditorium.
Presented by
UAC Concert Co-op & WCBN

I

By KATE SPELMAN
Outraged undergraduates have
been ordered out of the Rack-
ham study hall-renowned for
its silence and ponderous gran-
deur-since the beginning of the
term.
This exclusion marks the most
recent campaign launched by
the Rackham Graduate School
to enforce a long-standing rule
banning undergrads from the
hallowed hall.
"IT IS SAD that we must
stop undergrads from using the
hall, but there is limited seating
and complaints from grad stu-
dents that undergraduates have
been uncooperative in adhering
to the rules of no smoking, no
talking, and not eating in the
area," says Frank Zimmerman,
assistant to the Dean of Rack-
ham.
Founded in 1936 with a trust
fund left by Horace Rackham,
the entire school is designed
''exclusively to furnish graduate
school facilities for the Univer-
sity."
Consequently the spacious stu-
dy hall has always been intend-
ed for graduate students. But up
until now, the school's adminis-
trators have been fairly lenient
ineallowing other students to use
the facility.
"WE HAVE posted signs stat-
ing that it is for grad students
only, but they have been repeat-
edly ripped off and ignored,"
Zimmerman says.
Rackham School Government
President Craig Cummins also

has received complaints about
the undergraduate behavior in
the study hall.
He claims a number of grads
have found it "unsafe to study
in the building."
THE MOVE to exclude under-
graduates is as much an at-
tempt to improve security as to
revive the original purpose of
the study hall, Cummins says.
Most undergraduates asked
about the ban were annoyed
about the entire affair. "The
place is a study haven," re
marked one. "I hate having to
go to the UGLI because it's the
campus pick-up joint."
Cummins acknowledges that
sentiment and promises that the
Rackham Student Government
will help any undergraduates
find a place to study in safety,
silence, and comfort. Apparent-
ly just so long as it's not in the
Rackham building.
PAPUA NEW GUINEA
HAS TWO KNIGHTS
CANBERRA, Australia YM
-Sir Paul Lapun and Sir Ho-
race Niall became the first
Papua New Guineans to be,
knighted by the British govern-I
ment.
Sir Paul, the minister for
mines and energy, and Sir Ho-
race, speaker of the House of
Assembly, were created knight
bachelors for "long and dis-
tinguished service" to Papua
New Guinea. The ceremony
was in the Australian capital.

WASHINGTON (R)-John Con-
nally's lawyer attempted yester-
day to paint the former treasury
secretary's chief accuser as an
embezzler and liar who once of-
fered to incriminate former
President Lyndon Johnson to
escape a fraud investigation.
"Do you deny that you offer-
ed to give evidence to the De-
partment of Justice against the
former president who you had
worked for?" the witness, Jake
Jacobsen, was asked.
"YES SIR, I deny that," said
the man who now insists that
Connally took $10,000 in illegal
gifts for influencing a 1971 milk
support price decision.
Edward Bennett Williams, in
the first major cross-examina-
tion at Connally's bribery trial,
attacked Jacobsen's credibility
through prolonged readings from
former sworn testimony in
which Jacobsen said he had notj
given Connally the payoff. I
Williams' questioning about
Johnson, whom Jacobsen had
served as legislative counsel in
the White House for two years,
followed a series of questions
about a fraud investigation by
the Department of Justice in
1972.
HE ASKED Jacobsen whether
the Federal Home Loan Bank
Board hadsrecommendedsthat
he be investigated in a series
of bank transactions unrelated
to the milk price support de-
cision.
"I didn't know they'd made
such an investigation,"said;
Jacobsen, a silver-haired man
dressed in a dark brown suit.
Williams then elicited from
Jacobsen that he had been
questioned by the Department
of Justice in 1972 about kick-
backs on loans from Texas sav-
ings and loan institutions.

ONE CASE mentioned by Wil-
liams involved $175,345 from
Robert Taft of Fort Worth-
proceeds of a loan of more than
$1 million.
"I don't understand what
you're talking about," Jacobsen
insisted. Connally's lawyer then
asked about an investigation in-
to whether Jacobsen had taken
$97,000 worth of stock in a loan
transaction.
"I don't know," said Jacob-
sen.
WILLIAMS interrogated Jac-
obsen with short quick questions
rapidly striding back and forth
in front of the jury box. The
courtroom was jammed, even
with temporary chairs, and a
line of people-many of whom
had waited since 5:30 a.m.-
was left in the hallway.'
Jacobsen pleaded guilty last
year to a single charge of pay-
ing Connally an illegal gra-
tuity. In return the government
dropped seven felony counts of
fraud in a San Angelo, Tex.,
savings and loan case.
Williams read extensively
from testimony Jacobsen had

accuser
given under oath to the Water-
gate grand jury and to the Sen-
ate Watergate committee.
IN ONE grand jury appear-
ance on Nov. 2, 1973, Jacobsen
was asked what he did with the
$10,000 that he had been given
by Associated Milk Producers,
Inc., for Connally's use.
"I kept it," Jacobsen said
then. "It is in my safe de-
posit box."
IN THE sworn testimony that
preceded Jacobsen's guilty plea
he insisted that Connally refused
the money first because he was
a Democrat in a Republican ad-
ministration and a second time
when, out of Richard Nixon's
cabinet, he headed Democrats
for Nixon.
In the Nov. 2, 1973, grand jury
appearance Jacobsen was asked
why he had not returned the
money to the milk producers.
"The reason I waited so long
was that this Watergate thing
came along and I didn't want
to return it because of this,"
Jacobsen said then.
"I just left it in the safe
deposit box and forgot about it
in a little while, frankly."

and

UNEMPLOYMENT

FORUM on

ECONOMIC CRISIS

Speakers from:

i
r
r
F
i
t

United National Caucus-UAW
Union for Radical Political Economics
TUESDAY, APRIL 8--8 p.m.
ANGELL AUD. D
NEW AMERICAN MOVEMENT

WED. at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
"DEEP,WILD HUMOR!"
-Time Magazine
SeductionM
of Mimi N4CLORfl
FROM NEW LINE CINEMA 9

I

4.

/d
vi orf 4, '
o ~0J

I

1

RENT

ME

$5

A

DAY

1Oc A MILE
New VW Super Beetles
Pickup and Delivery Available

TONIGHT at 7 & 9 P.M.
WED. at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
7th HIT WEEK
-From the deep dark re-
cesses of the mind of Mel
Brooks comes
YOUNG PG
FRANKENSTEIN

/' __

RENTABEETLE
2016 PACKARD RD.
ANN ARBOR

I

r INCREASES LEARNING ABILITY
* EXPANDS AWARENESS
* DEVELOPS FULFILLMENT
Introductory Lectures
(last campus intros this term)
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9
2:00 & 8:00 P.M.
Michigan League, Rooms D &E
(take elevator to third floor)
DAY COURSE: APRIL 9-10 A.M.
SIMS OFFICE, 1207 Packard (corner of Wells)
*TRANSCENDENTAL
ME DITATION
for further information, phone 761 -8255

I

994-9300

.vt .. "-..nst..fl syn. . ? ?.;{ ,..n : lfl 1....A.. W4.... . v...... . v; ...:::.": . ..r.tt .... .... Jtt:^""::..
rx.. . ".. .. .x ." . .r:...... ..... ...f" . ..: :.i:.Y....:r:::+.. ::......... .. ...,,. . . . . .
F " ~~~~~~~~~~~~~.ff .Y ..".r...i....................... ..........................s ......~ "i.. v.............................
rDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
. 7 .a.r........ v .: ... . ...:{ .^"J ..r,....:..... ...... .

I----c-------------- - ---- - -- --

I

TOINIGjHT at/7& 9 P.M.
WED, at 1 -3-5-7-9 P.M

Tuesday, April 8
Day.Calendar
WUOM: Milton Friedman, U. of
Chicago, "Myth or Reality in Con-
temporary Public Opinion," 10 am.
Medical Ctr. Commission for Wo-
men: C3086 Outpatient, noon.
CREES: Halina Taborska, "Meyer-
hold and Early Revolutionary Thea-
tre," Conf. Rm., Rackham, noon;
Ladislav Mateika,'"Language Plan-
ning and Language Cinflicts in
Yugoslav Cities," 48 Lane Hall, 4
pm.
Ctr. Chinese Studies: Mien Laing,'
Wayne State, "Big-foot in the Late
Ming Art World," Commons Rm.,:
Lane Hall, noon.
Pendleton Arts Information Ctr.:
Open hearth, Martha Burns, Pig-
town Flingers, Pendleton Rm.,
noon.
Maternal, Child Health Films:
Miss Goodall and the Wild Chim-
panzees; Rock-a-Bye Baby, M1112
SPH II, noon.
Baseball: UM vs. Western Michi-
gan, Fisher Field, 2 pm.
Environmental Studies: J. Nys-
tuen, "Some Problems of the Green
Revolution," 4001 CC Little, 3 pm.
Physics: Dr. Philippe Crane,
Princeton, "Cosmology: The Eearch
for a Standard Candle," 1041 Ran-

dali Lab Dr. E. Eichten, Cornell,
"Charmonium and Charm Thresh-
old," 203$ Randall Lab; both at 4
pm.
Statistics: Miloslav Jirina, MSU,
"Best Linear Predictor for Certain
Nonstationary Processes," 3010 An-
gell, 4 pm.
English, Extension Service: Poetry
reading, Larry Fagin, Aud. 3, MLB,
4:10 pm.
Thos. M. Cooley Lecture: Robt.
S. Morison, "Biology, Ethics, and
Law: Can They Help Each other?";
"Present Prospects," 100 Hutchins
Hall, 4:15 pm.
Hillel: The Living Jewish Catalog,
"How to Do a Jewish Wedding,"
Hillel, 8 pm.
Music School: Piano Chamber
Music, Recital Hall, 12:30 pm; con-.
cert band, Harry McTerry, conduc-
tor, Hill Aud., 8 pm; opera work-
shop, Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 763-4117
Camp Douglas Smith, MI Coed:,
interview Weds. April 9 9-5; open-
ings incl. specialists in canoe, trip,
camp craft, waterfront, nurse &
head cook.
Jewel Co., Detroit, MI: Interview
Thurs/Fri. Apr. 17/18 9-5; openings
incl. route salesmen, working estab-

lished routes, & customer reps; in-
cludes jobs inFlint, Saginaw, Grand
Rapids, Toledo; excellent oppor-
tunities; further details available.
Camp Tamarack, Detroit Fresh
Air Society: interview Fri., Apr. 11
1-5; openings for Unit supvs. (21);
waterfront & kitchen aids.
We have a great
reputation and
we work at
keeping it great.
U-M STYLISTS
at the UNION

'
f
t l
i

July LSAT
- SPEND A WEEKEND WITH I
OUR ATTORNEY
I The Professional Weekend Seminar
with an established success record
taught by Practicing Attorneys. I
Complete Fee-$85.
LAW BOARD I
CALL TOLL FREE REVIEW CENTER ~'
S 800-458-238032 Gramercy Pk. So. I
I {!(n Pa. 814-435-6521 ) New York, N. . I
""10003 - I
* . I
- Detroit 9 San Francisco * St. Louis -I
---------------------------

PG

r.,___

COLLEGE STUDENTS

Su

iL

hR JOBS

A

GEO
ELECTI ONS
XI/iTF1

Are You Interested In:
" PHOTOGRAPHY? * MARKETING?
" WRITING? . CREATIVE DARKROOM
* LAYOUT & DESIGN? WORK?
" BUSINESS . ILLUSTRATION?
MANAGEMENT? . DECIDING WHAT WILL
" SPORTS? BE IN YOUR STUDEN
* SALES? YEARBOOK?
If so, you are invited to a
MASS MEETING
for the 1975-1976
AIIIMAPfl.IAkI YFARRAAV

T

Our service working in conjunction with business and indus-
try has compiled extensive listings of employers throughout the
Midwest in all states and most major cities who are committed
to provide summer employment for college students.
Our listings also include State & Federal Agencies, Govern-
ment Internship Programs, Private Resort & Camp Counseling
Positions, etc.
Whether you live in Michigan or another state in the Mid-
west you need our listings to help you find the employers with a
job for you.
For only $4.98 (includes cost of pamphlet, postage & handl-
ing charges) you will receive our pamphlet entitled SUMMER
JOBS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS.

I

lI l

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan