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April 03, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, April 3, 1975
'U' Turns
Joys of juggling
Anyone can do it with one ball. Even two balls isn't too diffi-
cult. But did you ever try doing it with three balls? Or four?
You can learn how-by free juggling lessons every Tuesday
and Thursday, 3-5 p.m. in the Diag. Mesha the Clown, alias
Mesha Walczak, welcomes experienced jugglers, and beginners
alike, to the free lessons she will give throughout this month.
The former U-M student, who now works as a children's
clown, got "turned on to juggling" last spring, through Michael
Lynch, an Ann Arbor clown. She then spent the summer travel-
ling around the country, searching for clowns and learning more
about juggling. She got the idea for the lessons at a similar
event in San Francisco," she says. "There were 40 people out
juggling on a Saturday afternoon-it was one of the most enjoy-
able days I ever had!"
Mesha says juggling is not difficult. "I've seen people learn
in half an hour," she says. "But it takes concentration."
Mesha herself can juggle up to four tennis balls. She also
juggles potatoes, clubs, even snowballs. She says she likes
"that magical atmosphere that not everyone juggles."
And Mesha hopes her free lessons can help others to dis-
cover the joys of juggling.
MARY MILLER
Students sacrifice
The cry for blood resounds this week, and U-M students are
answering and giving at the Red Cross clinic in the Michigan
Union ballroom.
"This is the third time this year we've set up a clinic at the
University," says Bob Moyer, Washteaw County Blood Program
co-ordinator for the American Red Cross.
Ordinarily, the blood bank is set up only twice a year, but
because unemployment collections for industrial units are down,
the Red Cross has called on the student blood program again.
Moyer says students who donate blood may give to any
of several blood programs. "The student blood bank covers all
U-M students plus the families of the donors," he explains. Stu-
dents may also donate on a family plan, or give for a specific
person in need of blood.
Moyer calls the U-M student blood program "very success-
ful." Approximately 1,000 pints a week are usually collected, he
says, which is close to the national average. In Washtenaw
County, where student blood clinics are set up at the Univer-
sity, Eastern Michigan University and Concordia College, "we
collect one-third of our annual blood from the campuses," says
Moyer.
Moyer adds, however, that many more students would give
"if it were possible to communicate better on campus." The
strongest advertising medium for the program, he says, is word-
of-mouth.
The student blood program, sponsored by the U-M chapter
ofthe Alpha Phi Omega fraternity, began five years ago, run-
ning a one-day clinic twice a year. Since then, says Moyer, the
program has expanded each year. This year the student clinic
has operated for a full week in November, February, and now
April.
Aside from the student blood bank clinics, Moyer says, stu-
dents may also give blood at the Red Cross clinic at 2729 Pack-
ard, open the second Friday of every month.
MARY MILLER

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
- S~i:;i~ iitt:'"V 2: i~z: iiE~f

Page Three

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Government
opens case in
Connally trial

Fri
I
{ i I
11
.I

Ann Arbor National Organization
For Women
Supports the Day Core
Charter Amendment

l

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I

THESE CANDIDATES FOR CITY COUNCIL
ALSO SUPPORT IT:
William Bronson Carol Ernst
Judy Gibson David Goodman
Everett Guy Carol Jones
Lavine Ross Frank Shoichet

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7
a
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7

AP Photo
FORMER TREASURY Secretary John Connally leaves the
U. S. District Court House in Washington yesterday after the
opening of his trial on bribery charges.

WASHINGTON (R) - A prosecutor in John Connally's bribery
trial said yesterday $10,000 the former treasury secretary is ac-
cused of accepting "left footprints . . . right up to Mr. Con-
nally."
Assistant Special Prosecutor Jon Sale made the statement as he
outlined the government's case shortly after a jury of seven
women and five men was seated.
Sale said the government would present a trail of testimony,
hotel records, official appointment books, logs and bank records
to prove Connally's old friend Jake Jacobsen gave him two
illegal gifts of $5,000 and later tried to cover up with false
testimony and new $100 bills intended to fool investigators.
AN OPENING statement from Connally's chief defense lawyer,
Edward Bennett Williams, was postponed until after a midday
recess. Connally is charged with two counts of accepting bribes
from Associated Milk Producers Inc. in 1971 in the form of
illegal gratuities - what the prosecutors called "thank yous" for
Connally's efforts to persuade President Richard M. Nixon to
raise milk price supports.
The higher price supports were granted by President Nixon.
The Associated Milk Producers were Jacobson's clients.
Connally has consistently denied the charges.
THERE WERE some new elements in the government's case
outlined by Sale. He said the jury would be shown certain bank
records and other evidence that did not surface publicly in the
milk fund investigations last year by the Senate Watergate Com-
mittee and the House Judiciary Committee.
But the government still says it has only one eywitness to
the two alleged bribes. That is Jacobsen himself, who once tes-
tified repeatedly that Connally had refused the money and who
implicated Connally only after he had received a favorable deal
from the government reducing his own criminal charges.

---~- --

FOR WOMEN ONLY
We stock a large selection of
ORTHO products, including:
Delfen contraceptive foam w/ applicator and refill
Delfen contraceptive cream w/ applicator and refill
Conceptrol cream w/ applicator
Ortho-Cream wi applicator and refill
SPECIAL: Ortho-gynol contraceptive jelly

Pd. Pot. Adv.

Surgery postponed,1'
economyhits health'
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. UP) - People have begun to postpone
surgery because of the recession, and hospitals are now oper-
ating 10 to 20 per cent below their usual levels, according
to a survey conducted by a private research firm.
Among its other effects, the economic slowdown contributes to
problems hospitals are having paying their bills and reduces
demand for medical supplies, according to Richard Hughes, di-,
rector of health care study for Arthur Little, Inc.
"WE TEND to think of all hospital care as being emergency,
but a segment of medical needs are things that are postponable,
such as cosmetic surgery," Hughes said. "That's where we're
seeing the lighter load.-
"Most of the demand for hospital space is still there. It may be
80 or 90 per cent. But instead of hospitals running at 100 or
101 per cent of capacity as before, it's down now."
The reduction in demand has been felt most sharply by;
suburban hospitals, he said. Big city teaching hospitals are as
full as ever.
AMONG THOSE who are avoiding hospital stays appear to be
people who have been laid off and have lost their group health
insurance.
"During a recession, people think long and hard before they go
into a hospital and take on a serious debt unless it's ap emer-
gency," he said.
At the same time, private medical insurance companies are
trying to cut expenses by challenging claims that they ordinarily
would let pass without question, Hughes said. This means that
the companies are slower to pay hospitals. And as people rely
more heavily on government insurance programs, these funds,
too, are slower in getting to hospitals.
"NINETY PER CENT of payments to hospitals come from
these third parties," he said. "The problem is one of time lag.
It takes so long for the hospitals to get money in the front door
that they are having a hard time paying their bills."
Hospitals used to take 45 to 60 days to pay their bills to medical
suppliers, Hughes said. Now they often take 180 days.

NOW $2.49

reg. $2.72

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 146
Thursday, April 3, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d at Ily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann

Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

Also TAMPAX, both sizes
BRING THIS AD and get
404 OFF TAMPAX 40 size
reg. $1.59 - with this ad $1.19
530 s.state Street. in the basement of the MichiganUnion
open m-f 9-9 sat 10-5 sun12-5
K __________

1,2-

11

SPOETRY READING
Thurs., April 3, 7:30 p.m.
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

..

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i

MAY

4
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GRADUATE?

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S

. . . . +.av{.f. . . .... . .. . .. . ... . .. ..*.'.,.. ............ .....**..*..,*. . . . . . . . .
-DAILY OFFICIAL BU LLETI N
r 'ys" J{.............. . ...
... ,f'}^:?f{ '-'4"y'y}{ ;,;,;; .. "":.:":w":r":.:

A hat, last worn by Napoleon

in
in

1815, was sold in an auction
France in 1970 for $29,800.

Thursday, April 3
Day Calendars
WUOM: Marvin Becker, "Michel-c
angelo and the Changing Florentinec
World," 10 am.
Psychology :Marcia Guttentag,s
Harvard, "phanging Sex-role Stereo-
typing in the Schools," E. Cont.f
Em., 4th Fir., Rackham, 9 am;c
"Uses and Abuses of Evaluation Re-3
search," Leo. Em. I, MLB, 4 pm.
Pendleton Arts Information Ctr.:1
Mandolin--Martha Burns of the
"Pigtown Flingers," Union, noon. C
Baseball: UM vs. U. of Detroit,c
Fisher Field, 2 pm.
Environmental Studeis: J. Kolars,
"Peasant Agriculture," 4001 CC Lit-,
tle, 3 pm.
Library Science: Katharine M.
Stokes, W. Michigan U., "IFLAfrom
Two Points of View," Rackham
Amph., 3 pm.I
Int'l Ctr.: Peter Goulding, "Stu-i
dent Travel in Australia," Int'l Ctr.
Lounge, 3:30pm.
Spanish Culture, Language Films:
Pablo Casals; Castillos on Espana,
126 Res. Coll., 4 pm.
Art History: Reynor Banham,
"The Futurist Tradition in Modern
Architecture," Aud. A, Angell, 4:10
pm.
Chemistry: Molecular Energy
T r a n a f e r Symposium -- Da-
vid M. Hanson, SUNY, Stony Brook,
"Exeitonstates and Energy Trans-'
fer, in Molecular Crystals," 1300
Chem .,4 pm; Stuart Rice, U. of
Chidago, "Elementary Photochemi-
cal Processes," 1300 Chem., 8 pm.
Music School: Guest recital -
Jean-Marie Londeix, saxophonist,
Revelli Hall, 3:30 pm; piano cham-
ber concert, Recital Hall, 8 pm;
opera, "Tales of Hoffman," Men-
delssohn, 8 pm.
Ctr. Japanese Studies: James
O'Brien, ┬░Bendix Int'l, "Foreign In-
vestment and Licensing in Japan,"
Commons Em., Lane Hall, 7:30 pm.
Women's Studies Films: Women's
Liberation; FearWoman, Lec. Em. 1,
MLB, 8 pm."
Carter Planning & Placement
3200 SAB; 764-710
Looking for work with children? j
Check list published by Child Care
Personnel Clearinghouse available
at CP&P; both summer & perma- j
net "obs open.
U. Southern Cal. offers 1'. post-
tionj: fraternity grad, resident ad-
viser-, tuition; free rm. & bd.;
must be full-time grad student at
USC inquire: Fraternity Affairs Ad-
viser, Student Union 202, USC, U.
Park, Los Angeles, CA 90007.
Summer volunteers needed by
-American Friends Service Commit-
+A.A Tiny. - nmiert1in iludere-

searchto up-date prey. child labor
study in agriculture; Latin Ameri-
can prog. includes 4 units in Mexi-
co & 1 in Honduras--MUST speak
Spanish; further details available
at CP&P.
Amoco Research Ctr., Ill; opening;
for chemist (BS) studying for PhD;
check Summer Placement; phone
3-4117.
Camp Douglas Smith, MI. Coed:
interview WKed. 4/9/75 9-5; open-
ings incl. canoeing, tripping, camp
craft, waterfront, nurse & head
cook; age 19 up.
Camp Tamarack, MI. Coed Fresh

Air Society: interview Fri., Apr. 4
9-5; positions limited; check by
phone for details.
Music Therapist-Field exp. at
Nursing Home - June 16-July 25;
student clinicians funded by grant
from Grotto Foundation; inquire
Dir. Summer Session, College of
Saint Teresa, winona, MN 55987.,
Music for Exceptional Children-
June 24-July 11-offered at U. of
Miami; 3 crds. $60 per undergrad &
$100 per grad. cr.; write: Michael
vavrek, Music Coord., Sch. of Con-
tinuing Studies, U. of Miami, P.O.
Box 248005, Coral Gables FL 33124.

TODAY or
TOMORROW
If you plan to attend
the M a y commence-
ment, you must order
a cap and gown by
Friday, April 4, 1975.
university cellar
769-7940

I

I If you plan to attend the May 3 commence-
ment, you must order a cap and gown by this
Friday, April 4, 1975.
" All orders must be paid in advance.
* Late orders will be charged a $2.00 late fee
and will be subject to availability.
" RENTAL RATES
CAP& HOOD TOTAL
GOWN (optional)
BACH 6.50 -6.50
MAST 7.25 5.25 12.50
DOCT 7.75 5.50 l 13.25
*ORDER AT THE
university cellar
in the basement of the Michigan Union
769-7940

I

I

Syearbook time
BUY an ENSIAN
Call us at 764-561
or come to 420 Maynard
(LIMITED SUPPLY)

I

I

END THE REPUBLICAN
REIGN of ERROR
REPUBLICAN MAYOR STEPHENSON VOTED AGAINST
MONEY FOR DAY CARE IN ANN ARBOR.

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we're having a GREAT

VOTE

DEMOCRATIC

MONDAY, APRIL 7th
Pd Pot. Adv.

I

________

April

r

Student Government Council
TODAY is the LAST DAY to run for SGC.
Sign up in Rm. 3909 Michigan Union, until
5 p.m. ANY student willing to spend 6-8
hrs. a week with some knowledge of Uni-

139019

I

ALL YARn
at the Main Store

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_ _ _ _ _ ._ ' _ t L _ _ _

i up ct rvt-rire c soe ii'ft rnnintI1- t mv .U Ua in 1 a -

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a a a 2 A __ 1L -.L 9 - -

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