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January 16, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-16

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Page Tv. o

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 16, 197-

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.. ..

Undergraduate
Political Science,
Association Meeting

POETRY READING
with JOHN PAVAL
A READING FROM HIS WORKS
T THURSDAY, Jan. 16--7:30 z
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(Guild House Fri. noon lunches beqinninq Jan. 24)
Reduced Rates Through Saturday
Billiards & Bowling at the Union

STATE OF THE UNION

Ford paints pessimistic pictur

Re-organization meeting, plus
LA URI MULLER

. . 4

(former "U''' undergrad; now a graduate
student at John F. Kennedy School of
Government)
"Graduate School
Possibilities"
Thursday, Jan. 16-7:30 p.m.
6602 Haven Hall

(Continued from Page 1) dent promised would be return-;
billion cash rebate of 1974 tax ed to the economy chiefly
payments as an anti-recession through his tax proposals.
weapon - to combat the slump Ford's plan also called for im-
in sales and unemployment position of an excess profits
running at over seven per cent. tax on oil companies.
The President also called for William Seidman, W h i t e
an annual $24.5 billion person- House adviser on economic af-
al and business tax cut, begin- fairs, said the new oil fees
ning this year, to compensate would mean a one-shot increase
Americans - especially poor of two per cent in the cost of
families - for new oil fees and living - already running at the
tariffs. high rate of around 12 per cent.
HE SAID he would increase PRESIDENT Ford, who said
import duties on foreign oil by he would order mandatory cuts
one dollar a barrel on Febru- in foreign oil imports if neces-
ary 1, by another dollar on sary, told Congress he had re-
March 1 and a third on April jected gas rationing, but the
1. He asked Congress to im- White House said that he would
pose similar tariffs on domestic soon ask for standby authority
oil. to impose rationing.
These new oil fees were ex- Ford said the United States
pected to bring in $30 billion a must reduce oil imports by one
year - all of which the Presi- million barrels a day by the
end of this year and by two mil-
_ _ _ _ _ _ lion barrels by the end of 1977.
----~-~~~~~ -tillBy 1985, it must become invul-

nerable to supply disruptions
such as the Arab oil boycott last
winter.
Reaction in Congress was ov-
erwhelmingly in favor of tax
cuts especially for lower paid
Americans, but Ford's energy
plans caused concern because
it was felt higher oil costs
would increase inflation by
pushing up prices for manufac-
tured goods.
OBSERVERS said tax cuts
were certain - the Democrat's
own economic battle plan calls
for relief - but Congress would
decide how deep they would be.
One aspect of the President's
program virtually certain to
provoke a clash in Congress was
his announced intention to veto
any new spending programs in
1975.
Demanding a restraint in gov-
ernment spending, Ford said
the federal deficit would be $30

billion this year and $45 billi
next year, and the nation
debt would rise to more tha
$500 billion.
HEM SAID Americans wer
partly to blame for their eci
nomic troubles because the
had been self-indulgent, spen
ing more government mone
than they could afford.
The United States, he addef
was still the country best abJ
to meet human needs, but 1
pulled no punches in descril
ing the worsening condition (
the economy.
Abandoning the traditional 0a
ening for a State of the Unic
message - that the countr
was in good shape - the Pres
dent bluntly said: "The stat
of the union is not good. Mi
lions of Americans are out (
work. Recession and inflatic
are eroding the money of mi
lions more."

BILLIARDS $1/HR. J
Free Instructions
Pocket Billiards
Jan. 22
Cominq February 20!
Pocket Billiards Exhibition
Open 11 a.m. Mon. -Sat.,

BOWLING 40c
per game
Sign up now
Mixed Leagues
1 p.m. Sundays

I

MEA delays sympathy strike

.: i

(Continued from Page i) peals, which ruled last Satur- cuit court decision, "so fundl
George Truedell announced that day that the rehiring should be mental, so historic, that we fe
the union's executive board had delayed pending review of the the appeals court and the stat
d e c i d e d "overwhelmingly" case. Supreme Court will affirm it."
to postpone action until a cur- It was the MEA's appeal of Terry Herndon, executive se
rent round of appeals are ex- the decision that the state Su- retary of the National EducE
hausted. No strikes would be preme Court overruled yester- tion Association, 1.6 millio
called if the MEA wins those day. member parent body of th
appeals. MEA, gave a short moral
MEA EXECUTIVE secretary boosting address, pledging th
T H E CRESTWOOD school Herman Coleman was confi- the national union would sta
board dismissed most of the dent last night that the Crest- by the Crestwood strikers.
Dearborn Heights district's wood teachers, who have not Herndon said later that t
teachers after they refused to had a contract since the sum- national organization was pr
return to classes following a mer of 1973, would win their pared to lend.financial suppo
December 4, walkout, legal fight. to the MEA, but had not y
The state Supreme Court ruled He termed the pro-union cir- done so.
unanimously earlier yesterday
that it would not entertain anh
appeal by the striking teachers Stephenson sees tighturrf
until the state Court of Appeals
heard the case. The appeals
body is scheduled to listen to (Continued from Page I)
oral arguments on the dispute mean, that Democratic candidate Albert Wheeler will win.
tomorrow. In 1973, Stephenson won the mayorship with about 48 per cer
The high court justices split of the vote as the Human Rights Party (HRP) siphoned off poter
- in denying another MEA ap-
peal to allow the fired teachers tiiDmcatcspot

I

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to return to the classroomsj
pending disposition of the case.
LAST THURSDAY, a three
judge Wayne County Circuit
Court panel ruled that the fir-!
ings violated the 1947 Teacher
Tenure Act, and that the dis-
missed teachers should be re-
hired.
The Crestwood district, which
has already hired over 100 non-
union replacement teachers, ap-
pealed the Circuit Court deci-
sion to the state Court of Ap-
Colby says
CIA spied
on Citizens
(Continued from Page 1)
to gather information on "plans
for demonstrations, pickets, pro-
tests, or break-ins that might
endanger CIA personnel, facili-
ties and information."
He said the undercover agents'
reports were given to the FBI,
the Secret Service and local
police departments.
Colby, who became CIA di-
rector in July 1973, said the
. agency's involvement with dis-
sident groups in the United
States began in 1967 with Presi-
dent Lyndon Johnson's appoint-
ment of a National Advisory
Commission on Civil Disorders.

tepJenson commentea that e ter we get a ma orny
first place votes or we do not win" because the HRP candidat
Carol Ernst should finish last and most of the people voting fc
her will probably pick the Democrat as their second choice.
But the mayor claimed that Republican leadership is nece,
sary to insure "individual responsibility and reward for individu,
initiative."
Soviet decision hit

(Continued from Page 1)
its minorities to emigrate.
S t a t e Department officials
said that trade with the Soviet
Union would continue despite
the lack of an agreement, prob-
ably at its current level of $1,000
million a year. An attempt was
underway to see whether new
legislation should be submitted
to Congress so that Russia could
receive most - favored nation
status without unnecessary in-
terference in its internal af-
fairs.
"There won't be any return
to the past," one official said.
"There is too much momentum,
too many c o n t a c t s between
American businessmen and So-
viet organizations. There ; a
greater flow of business w
than ever before."

OTHER officials said ,h
saw no sign of a hard-line S
viet attitude in other areas.
The main casualties of tl
Soviet rejection of the trar
agreement, announced Tuesd
by Kissinger, emerged yeste
day as
-The 130,000 Russian Jew
who have applied to emigrat
to Israel and whose prospect
are now much in doubt;
-Kissinger's ability to deive
on promises he has made in nf
gotiations with the Russians a
detente; and
-The political standing <
Jackson, the Washington Dem
crat and 1976 presidential as
pirant who insisted that the Rua
sians allow their minorities t
emigrate in exchange for trad
concessions.

U' files opened

I

Something
NEW
IS IN
THE AIR
W103 FM
SOON!

}
i
I
I

(Continued from Page 1)
bers of the LSA adminisrrafive
board, counselors routinely see
admissions letters. Therefore,
they are used for a functian
other than their original pt'r-
pose, which under the law re-
quires them to be open.
Other committee members
feel that high school counselors
write these letters believing
they are written in confidence,
and the University should keep
the letters secret.

..

; Another important feature of

DONALD FOSS
DEPT. OF PSYCHOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, AUSTIN, TEXAS
"Sentences, I Have Served: Recent
Research in Sentence Comprehension"
JANUARY 16
MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
SEMINAR SERIES
TEA: 3:15 p.m., 2059 MHRI
SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m., 1057 MHRI
ANN ARBOR CLOTHING
31 & T A,1 ANN ARBORCSERVI 9G
~ic~TAI ANKARBR SidCE 1939

the law is the appeals procs
dure it requires the Universit
to create. If students' rea
something in their file that the
felt was inaccurate, they wi
be able to file complaints.
The University is in the pr
'cess of working out the proc
dure. According to Morris a
bitration will probably be co
ducted by a disinterested thir
party.
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