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January 15, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-15

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Dean describes talks
with Colson in jail

Wednesday, January 15, 1975
LSA unit approves
new ROTC plan

LET YOUR PRIOR
SERVICE BENEFIT
YOU
0 Earn an Officer s

(Continued from Page 1)
sharing a cell with Colson, Dean
said Colson told him during dis-
cussions about Watergate of the
alleged Burger-Nixon conversa-
tions.
"I LEARNED it . . from
Mr. Colson," Dean said, "in
our conversations of trying to
put all the pieces together and
figure out what had happened,
why it happened, where things
had gone wrong and how this
had all come about."
"I understand," Stern said,
"that Colson had significant
knowledge of CIA activities and
frankly there was -a story some
time ago that you had knowl-
edge of a CIA break-in into ine
Chilean Embassy, the planting
of a bug and so on. Is that true?
Did you talk about that with
Colson?"
"TO ANSWER the 1irst part
of your question, Chuck did
have," Dean replied. "He read
the CIA file on Watergate and
amongst the files he read that
the CIA also thought I had
knowledge about the Chilean
Embassy break-in. which I

didn't, but worried about my
knowledge and my potential
testimony..
"The CIA had arrangaments
made to have the FBI go in
and remove the devices within
the Chilean Embassy before I
itestified."
"These materials Colson had
access to, then, verify there
was a bug in the Chilean Em-
bassy?" Stern asked.
"THAT'S CORRECT, that's
my understanding, yes," Dean
said.
Dean was also asked if he
knew of any involvement of
Vice President Nelson Rocke-
feller in CIA matters. Rockefel-
ler was a member of the For-
eign Intelligence Advisory Com-
mission and now heads Presi-
dent Ford's citizens' panel look-
ing into allegations -that the
CIA conducted illegal damestic
spying.
"Well, Chuck and I talked
about the commission," Dean
said, "hoping the commission
would tie itself down and an-
swer a lot of these unanswered
questions."

(Continued from Page 1)
'Armies must salute, of course,
but we don't want anything to
do with that."
PROTESTING the committee's
purely academic stance, 1 SAI
Student Government President
Mark Gold spearheaded debate
that focused on the moral im-
plications of supporting ROTC,
on campus. Gold expressed "re-
luctance to support a program
that will increase military ef-
fectiveness."
Student member Jane Praeger
raised similar doubts about
"courses like the 'History of the
Art of War,' which go against
the general education I came
here for.'
Arguing for the advantages of
ROTC, Psychology Prof. Jens
Zorn contended, "If one accepts
that there has to be a military,
I'd be distressed if t h e r e:
weren't reserve officers. They
should be trained at the best
and most liberal institutions, of
which the University of Mich-
igan is one."
WHILE admitting that thej
"arguments against the military
are very persuasive," Classical
Studies Prof. D o n Cameron
slammed "any principle being

applied which judges academic
merit on political criteria."
Cameron asserted, "If you be-
lieve in academic freedom, the
Uni-ersity must allow subjects
and men to exist which are
politically distasteful to some."
Countering student R o b e r t
Miller's charge that "you are
living in a fantasy world if you
can separate academics and
politics," Cameron declared,
"We are giving them the same
academic rights as other de-
partments."
THE CURRICULUM commit-
tee upheld the sub-committee's
recommendation that a maxi-
mum of 12 credit hours earned
in ROTC courses be counted to-
ward LSA degree credit and set
a limit of six hours in any of
the three groups.
Courses in the first group
w o u l d be counted as LSA
courses, not subject to the 12-
hour limit, while courses in the
other two groups would be
counted as non-LSA courses
s u b j e c t to non-LSA degree
credit.
The Curriculum committee
would have control of awarding
or eliminating credit for ROTC
courses, depending on their aca-
demic content.

Commission

in the

Army

in only two

yea rs.
a Earn an additional
$100 per month
* Learn to fly

II

o Guaranteed

job

II

upon graduation
and commissioning
" Starting salary
approx. $12,000
CONTACT the CHAIRMAN
ARMY OFFICER
EDUCATION PROGRAM
NORTH HALL
Telephone 764-2400
DO IT TODAY!

Sexuality and Personal Growth
A small group experience to help you
identify areas of your sexuality which you
would like to explore, grow in or deal with
more effectively. Particular areas of focus
will depend upon the needs of the group
participants. Examples might be: male
and female role expectations, touching,
sexual preference, peer pressures, sexual
expression, the nature of a meaningful
relationship, intimacy, jealousy, sexism,
sexual ethics, feelings about using or not
using contraceptives, sex and friendship,
etc. The groups will encourage personal
exploration and sharing of attitudes, feel-
ings, behavior and experiences in all par-
ticipants.
Two groups of 10 weekly 21/2 hr. sessions,
one on Tuesdays, one on Thursdays, 8-
10:30 p.m. are offered. Five men, 5 wo-
men, 2 facilitators in each group. Under-
graduates only. Free of charge. Offered
through the counseling services of Ethics
and Religion.

. _ ' I
, iI
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,a
IE

High and dry
TRUCK DRIVER FRED Brandt throws up his arms in dis-
gust as he considers the prospect of picking up the hundreds
of carp which slipped .out of his Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources truck in Janesville, Wisconsin. Two tons
of fish had been seined from the Rock River and were be-
ing transported upriver for sale.

Ford to ask $22.5
billion in new tax cuts

J une 2 to

August

16

(Continued from Page 1)
legislatures and organizations of
city and county officials.
Ford disclosed Monday night
in a TV-radio address that he
will ask Congress to authorize
a one-time cut of 12 per cent
in last year's taxes, to be ac-
complished through rebates to
individual tax payers of up to
$1,000. In addition he said he
wants a one-year increase, to a
flat 12 per cent, in the tax
credits businesses - claim for
money spent to expand and
modernize their production fa-
cilities.
NESSEN made additional key

disclosures yesterday that in-
cluded:
! A Ford plan to cut in-
dividuial income taxes, starting
this year, by $16.5 billion, with
the largest reductions going to
the poorest taxpaw~rs.
* A proposal to cut the maxi-
] mum corporate tax rate to 42
per cent from 48 per cent on
a permanent basis, resulting in
|$6 billion revenue loss.
* Direct federal payments of
$80 to each adult American who
is so poor he pays no income
taxes. This would cost an es-
timated $2 billion.

' !
3 EI
t'

ii
ii

I

i_

Call LEN SCOTT (764-7442) if you are inter-
ested. First come, first served. Brief interview
may be required. Groups will begin week of
January 20.

Regular Yale undergraduate term
Full-time or part-time study
Interdisciplinary curriculum
Programs in Interpretation and Criticism, The
Family, The Creative Process-Theory and
Practice, Europe and America, Values and
Institutions, Public Policy and Decision Making,
Environment and Natural Resources, History
and Public Policy, Genetics and Biochemistry,
China, olus basic courses
For appcation nformation contact:
Christopher T. B. Murphy
Director of Summer Term Admissions
1502A Yale Station
New Haven Connecticut 06520
203 432-4229 after January 1, 1975)

A

I 1 1I I

___________________-----~1

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