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March 27, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rhursdoy, March 27, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

rhur day M a ch 2 , 1 75 H E M C HI A N AIL

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. .. \ :,?.::{i: ? ,. r. ......
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Won ,5 ...ton 101:.. ,x .. Li"i?.i?
English concentratorsti willi no longer.'?:?i3have}::;o"pretend::: they're.
The previously:. staid Department. of-English: is gett::g a
cnentrationrequiremtos wich lnclehe opretcoursesy'r.e
"Wea expectedrstudntswhtoptcAmericanuanenishLtet-
gther oermiGhtoas wellwteachmitrthat2way,"madProf.bert
rnblackdiscusnogonriemwcouseadtol n whchcobies
The wo. sl tidDprtetofEgis sgetn

Kissinger
peace con]
WASHINGTON ('P) - Secre-
tary of State Henry Kissinger
said yesterday a Middle East
peace conference in Geneva is
the only apparent solution to
the 'potentially grave danger"
existing in the area.
Within hours after this assess-
ment, Israeli officials briefed.
reporters and said such a con-
ference stands little chance of
success, if it even starts.
KISSINGER told a nationally.
broadcast news conference that
the failure of his step-by-step ef-
fort to arrange an Arab-Israeli
settlement meant the only
choice now evident was to nego-
tiate "under more difficult cir-
cumstances" at Geneva.
He said he would contact the
Soviet Union, the conference
co-leader, "in the near future"
about resumption of the Geneva
talks.,
The secretary, unlike his per-
formances in past news confer-
ences, made no jokes or other
efforts to offset the seriousness
of the situation during the 45-
minute questioning, which also
included inquiries about Indo-

urges Middle East
ference in Geneva

question of what kind of peo-
ple we are," the secretary said,
people who would "deliberately
destroy an ally" by holding out
necessary aid.
In returning to the Israeli-
Arab problem, Kissinger seem-
ed unhappy about the Geneva
prospects, a feeling that re-
flected past doubts over the
success of any such meeting.
KISSINGER has always felt

a Geneva meeting would be too
large and cumbersome to pre-
vent meaningful negotiations,
and the Israeli officials repeat-
ed that assessment Wednesday.
The secretary all but ruled out
a return to anything similar to
the shuttle diplomacy he con-
ducted until it broke down last
weekend, but the Israelis said
it "should be continued at ae
proper time."

Old concentrators working under the group system won't
have to worry either, as the old core courses will be credited
the same way as the new ones, and any American literature
course will fit the Core III requirement.'
The courses have also been raised to the 300 level so as to
avoid the wasted hours previously needed when they were at the
200 level.
Another new step is the discontinuation of optional counsel-
ing in the English department. Under the new rules, a student
chooses a counselor who will help with all academic prob-
lems and will remain the student's advisor for all undergraduate
work.
Each counselor will advise ten students who remain the
same, and meetings within the adviser's group will be encour- Paradise born

AP Photo

rid

aged for topics of special interest.
This new system, it is hoped, will make the English Depart-
ment a little more "homey", and produce the small school
atmosphere always desired at mammouth institutions like the,
big "U".I
-WENDI POHS

Starving

scholars

Starving math scholars in search of stable employment, strainI
your resources no longer. For the past 12 years, the 'U's math
department has sponsored the T. H. Hildebrand Research Assist-
Professorship to give young math scholars from all over the
United States a chance to prove their worth.
The program, which was named for the chairman of the:
math department from 1934 to 1957, was originated to "further
the opportunities of young people to do math research" accord-
ing to Prof. James Wendell, an assistant chairman of the depart-
ment.
The stable employment clause of the program is what sets
it apart from counterparts at other institutions such as Yale and
MIT.I
The department is customarily authorized to award only one
position per year to the over 200 PhD.'s that normally apply.
"Competition is very severe, but we get a tremendous range of
young people competing -the brightest and most creative in the
country," claims present math department chairman Fredrick
Gehring.
Those who wish to apply are required by the department's
executive committee to have finished their doctoral work, and
to present three letters of recommendation. Although only the
committee is authorized to make selections, the whole staff may
participate in reviewing the work candidates have submitted.
This year's T. H. Hildebrand Research Assistant Professor-
ship was awarded to Debra Goldsmith, a topoligist - or "knot
theorist" - who received her doctorate from Princeton.
-TOM PRESTON
State income tax up

Don't be too heartened by the springtime aspirations of Natalie Hill and Peter Beauvais,
who launched their craft on the chilly waters of Lake Erie yesterday - they wore their wet
suits to fend off the cold.I
ECONOMIC POLICY BLASTED:
Burns reported worriedI
about the country's future'
WASHINGTON (UP - Chair- The 70-year-old chairman of years, at least, Burns is known'
man Arthur Burns of the Fed- the independent Federal Re- to feel.'
eral Reserve Board is said to serve Board does not give cn- But Burns is also optimistic
be "worried about the coun- the-record interviews to news- that the country will begin re-
try's future" because of what men, but his views were made covering from the current re-
he feels are mistaken actions on known in a background inter- cession sometime this year.
the economy by both Congress view by a high official of the At that time, Burns is Knovn
and the Ford administration. board. to feel, Congress should be
Burns is known to be hopeful BURNS is said to agree with ready to enact a massive bill to
that Congress may have "se- a recent report of the Office of cut government spending. 'It
cond thoughts" about its ac- Management and Budget that might not be the popular way,
tions and be willing to enact the 1976 budget deficit c o u 1 d but they will have t> recognize
massive spending reductions lat- easily reach $100 billion, if not it is the only available way," he
er in the year to keep the na- higher, because of actions now is said to feel.
tion's economic recovery from being taken by Congress and the BURNS believes the heavy
falling flat. administration, government borrowing t h a t
HE FAVORS a temporary tax "Look at Capitol Hill - one could be necessary t> finance
cut of as high as $25 billion chairman after another is mak- budget deficits would force in-
to stimulate the economy now ing a contribution to the deficit terest rates higher when t h e
but is opposed to permanent tax and recently the administration economic recovery begins. mak-
reductions and will fight them is competing with Congress on ing it more expensive for private
with all the power at his corn- a minor scale," and Burns does businesses to borrow money.
mand. not like it, the high official said. Such a turn-around in interest
A Senate-House conference THE COUNTRY'S tax base al- rates, he is known to feel,
committee has been debating a ready has been eroded by the "could abort the recauery."
tax cut of between $17 billion recent high inflation, and per-
and $30 billion that may include manent tax reductions would re-
some permanent tax reduction: sult in large and damaging bud- S ORT or LONG
features. get deficits for another Six HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE
S- -DASCOLA

china...
HE MADE his basic point that
the failure of Congress to ex-
tend aid to Cambodia and South
Vietnam could be a betrayal
of a friend who had counted
on American support.
"The problem we face in In-
dochina today is an elementary
BOWLING IS
FUN
Trying to
find us is
Fun, Too!
UNION LANES

FREE FILM
The Gospel According
to St. Matthew
FRIDAY, MARCH 28
at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(corner of Washtenaw and Forest)
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF CHICAGO
OFFER
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
SOCIAL WORK ORIENTED COUNTRY CAMP
CAMP CHI-located 50 miles north of Madison and the
University of Wisconsin.
POSITIONS: Counselors-male and female
Specialists-Waterskiino. Sailing, Music, Senior Adult
Program Staff, Camocraft, Office Manager, Office Clerks.
INTERVIEW DATES:
MARCH 31-Call Mrs. Cooper (SAB Rm. 211) at
764-7460 for appointment
APRIL 1-Call Mrs. Garvin at Hillel, 663-3336 for
appointment. 1429 Hill Street.

"I understand from my mother that when
we first came to Ann Arbor we were in des-
perate economic condition. Dr. and Mrs.
Wheeler were there to help us. We're a
proud family and all of us are trying to
contribute to a better Ann Arbor for every-
body. I know how hard Dr. Wheeler has
worked with students and the public schools
to improve the situation for black students
and low-income students."
-VERNON WILLIAMS
Russell West, treasurer, 1230 W. Stadium

LANSING (UPI) - Weekly
paychecks of Michigan wage-
earners will shrink May 1 when
the state income tax rate is
increased from its current level
of 3.9 per cent to 4.6 per cent to
help balance the state budget.
The legislature gave final
approval to the .7 per cent
increase only hours after Gov.
William Milliken and Senate
and House leaders agreed on a
compromise to break a stale-
mate on the bill.
MILLIKEN, who recommend-
ed the increase to offset the
$210 million lost by voter re-
peal of the sales tax on food
and drugs, will sign the mea-
sure in plenty of time to meet
the May 1 effective date.
The Senate approved the
House-passed measure 'on a 24-
12 vote after two hours of
debate and the House concurred
in a Senate amendment only
10 minutes later on a 76-28 vote.
The tax hike will have a
greater impact on the pay-
checks of high wage earners
than on those of low wage
earners.
FOR INSTANCE, a family of
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXV, No. 140
Thursday, March 27, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i1 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6:00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail(other states and foreign).
day through Saturday morning.

four with a $10,000 annual in-I
come will pay $28 more a year.
The average family in that cate-
gory now pays $156 in state in-
come tax before property tax
credits.
The same family with a $15,-1
000 annual income would pay
$63 more a year -- from an
average $351 now to $414 after
May 1. The $20,000 a year wage
earner with a family of four
would pay $98 more annually
-- from an average $546 now
to $644 under the tax hike.
Under the compromise agreed
to by Milliken and legislative
leaders, the income tax rate
will remain at 4.6 per cent un-
til July 1, 1977 when it will
automatically be reduced to 4.4
per cent.

University Housing Council
UHC reps needed from every
dorm district. Sign up to run

BARBERS
ARBORLAND--971 -9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

. . . m

in SGC Offices,

3909 Mich-

To introduce* you to our
Drug Department*

igan Union, 9-5 Daily.

QUESTIONS?
call DAN BERLAND--764-6620

Proctor & Gamble and Barnes- Hind
are offering specials:

I

N

r

Spring-Summer Housing Applications
Will Be AYOilable March 31, 1975,
Housing Information Office, 1011 SAB
(COME LIVE WITH US)
A portion of BAITS HOUSING and WEST QUADRANGLE
will be open for occupancy during the Spring-Summer Term.

I

3o octa
3oz. concentrate

WEST QUAD
(Room and Board)
Single
Double
BAITS HOUSING
Single, Double or Triple Suite
ALL ROOMS
AIR CONDITIONED
Single-
Double Suite (two occupants)
Triple Suite (two occupants)

Spring-
Summer
Term
(May 4-
Aug. 23)
$765.60
685.30
$291.50
$370.70
331.10
370.70

Spring
Half
Term
(May 4-
June 28)
$382.80
342.65

Summer
Half
Term
(June 29-
Aug. 23)
$382.80
342.65

now 69C
reg. 890

2,OCOyp
SCOPGE.
w*
MOT* AS A ^O .AO

tA Barnes-Hin d
Wetting
Solution
For~ hard cm.tact lenses
2 F(. Oms(60 m.
4 OZ. $1.49
reg. $1.76

$145.75 $145.75

$185.35
165.55
185.35

$185.35
165.55
185.35

24 oz.

now $1.79

Order
Your

Several FRATERNITIES and SORORITIES will be open for
occupancy during the Spring-Summer Term. Accommodations
available include:
Co-ed, male or female residences
Single and double rooms at costs of $30.90 to $65.00/month
Kitchen, parking, laundry and recreational facilities

reg. $1.99

I

also Ce St 5 oz., 1oc
~ansatgi7j

off

(both flavors)
?Inc nff

Tid

I !

i

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