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March 26, 1975 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-26

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Wednesday,,Marrch 26, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, March 26, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

time for
Au's antics . .
... overshadow fights
bill crane's column
Well, ladies and gentlemen, is it Muhammad Ali the clown,
the sheister, the philanthropist or the preacher? It's certainly
not Ali the athlete in his latest "heavyweight" performance-a
match against Chuck Wepner brought to you by promoter Don
King. (Imagine-Ali, stinging like a bee, going 15 rounds with
a man who bled for ten of them.)
However, whatever impersonation Ali chooses to make, ev-
erybody tries to understand and psychoanalyze him.
Even comedian George Carlin is on record for taking
advantage of Al's notoriety. On an early Carlin album, cut
at the conclusion of Ali's forced retirement, Carlin tells his
audience that Muhammad All will once again be allowed to
work by the U. S. Government-after 'having previously taken
his title away.
Carlin says, "Of course, he had an unusual job - beating
people up. It's a strange calling, but one you're entitled to."
Carlin continues the satire saying that the government had
originally wanted Ali to change occupations-they wanted him
to go and kill people. Carlin says that's where Ali drew the
line. "I'll beat 'em up, but I don't want to kill 'em," All is heard
to say via George Carlin.
Anyway, the comedian's funning might be more truthful
now than ever before. 15,000 fans at Cleveland witnessed
neither 'a murder nor a maiming Monday night. Chuck Wep-
ner left a Cleveland hospital yesterday morning not too
terribly damaged.
Anyway, with the TKO of Wepner in the 15th, Ali became
the first fighter ever to knock Wepner down, however dubious
that distinction might be.
Yet after the fight Ali says, "Wepner proved his critics
were all wrong. Who would have thought that he would give me
a better fight than George Foreman?"
How preposterous! But I'll bet Foreman heard it and though
his first reaction was most likely a laugh, the statement prob-
ably bugged the dethroned champion.
So, Ali remains the character he has always been. lie's a
legend.
Now, the cynical among us can simply assume that All
won't give his money or much of it to charity, that he
really isn't a preacher (which he isn't officially until he re-
tires from boxing), and ththe took terrible advantage of
Wepner. In other words, he's not so hot and he's awfully
lucky he is so popular.
Maybe you are tired by Ali's antics and bored with his
entire routine. Maybe he's shot his wad and won't be able to
command such attention any longer.j
Nonsense! Ali is trying new things!
For this fight, he called himself an equal opportunity em-
ployer and wanted to fight a white challenger. But that had no
real racial meaning and was also a ruse. Ali didn't want to
fight Foreman or Frazier immediately because he has to build
momentum.
Ali picked the right opponent for publicity's sake and the
media really picked up on Chuck Wepner.]
One T. V. network last week interviewed Wepner and made1
him out to be a virtuous, proud-but-fading gladiator, trying one
more time.
Before the fight, Sports Illustrated quoted Wepner as say-
ing, " . . . here I am going in with a damned legend. You
know, most people live dull lives, never get a break, but with
one punch I could be a millionaire, and my wife wouldn't have
to work on the post office night shift anymore and my name
would mean something for a long, long time."
Wepner came through. That's the kind of stuff that makes
me cry.
It was reported that the fight would have to gross four
million bucks to break even. Reports yesterday estimated
the gross totals at between 4.7 and five million.
Fights of the century don't come along yearly. All is a man
who continues to search for ways to attract attention-if not
consciously, then by fortune.
If you are still bored by Ali consider this: If Joe Frazier
was champ you'd see him and the Knockouts on the Cher+
Show. Or if Foreman was champ, we'd see constant reruns of
him waving an American flag after his Olympic victory. j
So what is really ludicrous? Ali is a great fighter, but one man
bludgeoning another isn't pretty. Two personalities squaring off
is better entertainment.
Ali has managed to take some of the edge out of boxing by
being just a little preposterous even if the violence remains.

'Ble umber fae nderdog

By SCOTT LEWIS
As the Big Ten gymnastic
championships approach, hope-
ful gymnasts are striving to
perfect their routines in order
to place among the top finishers
at Crisler Arena this weekend.
A strong performance could
turn a dismal yeartinto a suc-
cessful one, while the slightest
error in a routine could make
a flop out of an otherwise bril-
liant season.
This will weigh heavily in
each competitor's mind when
seven other gymnastics teams
come to Ann Arbor to compete
against the host Michigan Wol-
verines in the 67th annual Big
Ten championships.
Michigan's outstanding tum-
blers must be labeled the fa-
vorites. The other competitors
realize this, but don't lack the
insoiration to do well.
Besides the team champion-
ship, specialists will be out to
finish on top in their respective
events, while the all-around per-
formers will try to capture the
coveted Big Ten all-around
championship.
Michigan's main opposition
will come from the defending
champions, Iowa. Last year
the Wolverines were undefeat-
ed going in to the Big Tens,
but the Hawkeyes captured
the title.
Iowa coach Dick Holzaepfel :s
pessimistic about his team's
chances this year.
"We're not as strong as we
were last year," Holzaepfel
said. "We lack the depth to do

NIGHT EDITOR.
AL HRAPSKY
well in many events. We will
have to perform exceptionally
well to win."
The Hawkeyes posted a 7-3
record this season. Their top
score in dual meets was 207.5,
a mark they will have to im-
prove to regain the title.
Their top all-around perform-
Ticket' prices for the Big
Ten Gymnastics Tournament
at Crisler Arena this week-
end are as follows: Friday's
events, adults $1.00 and stu-
dents $.50;Saturday' s
events, adults $2.00 and stu-
dents $1.00.
er is Bill Mason, who Holzaepfel
feels has a chance to finish first
in the all-around.
Other hopefuls for the Hayk-
eyes include defending Big Ten
floor exercise champion Dave
May, nommel horse specialist
Bob Siemianowski, Mark Hae-
ger on the rings and Carl Luben
on the parallel bars.
Illinois, which returns all
but onesperformerrfrom last
year's squad, possesses many
individual hopefuls.
Howard Beck is their most im-

pressive performer. Last year,
he finished second on the pom-
mel horse after a third-place
showing in 1973. Beck also fin-
ished ninth in the NCAA tourna-
ment in 1973.
Bill Karpen is their top man
on the high bar. Last year, he
finished third in the Big Ten
and he has looked good as of
late. He's averaging a score of
9.1 this year, and has posted a
high score of 9.3.
Other top performers for the
Illini include Tony Zander on the
parallel bars, and all-arounders
Bob Spurney and captain Frank
Erwin.
Illinois coach Hayasaki c6n-
cedes the top spot to Michi-
gan, but feels his squad can
give the other teams a battle
for second.
Wisconsin, the only Big Ten
team Michigan didn't face in a
dual meet this year, has a me-
diocre team despite some fine
individual talent.
Their top two all-around per-
formers are Carl Schrade and
Pete Wittenberg. Bill Wright is
their hopeful in floor exercise
and Mark Daniels is the top man
on the pommel horse.
Tomorrow: a preview of
Minnesota, Michigan State,
Ohio State and Indiana.

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
MICHIGAN GYMNAST Jerry Poynton executes a side horse maneuver in action from this
year's dual meet season. Poynton and his Wolverine teammates will be out to prove their
fine dual meet showing was no fluke when a host of Big Ten challengers, headed by defend-
ing champion Iowa, invade Crisler Arena this weekend.

ROCKETS ROUTED:
Celtics outlast Cleveland

NBA STANDINGSr
EASTERN CONFERENCE

By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Center Dave'
Cowens poured in 25 points and:
grabbed 17 rebounds last night)
to help the Boston Celtics to an
89-84 victory over the Cleveland
Cavaliers.
The victory brought the Celt-
ics within one-half game of theI
idle Washington Bullets, who
sport the best record in the
NBA. The Bullets are 55-20 and
the Celtics 55-21.
The difference between best
and second - best records is
worth $4,500 per player in post-
season money.

THE CAVALIERS opened up
a 25-20 advantage in the first
period, but watched the Celtics
tie the game at 44 by halftim-e.{
John Havlicek broke the tie'
with a 20-foot jumper early in!
the third period, and the vwsitors
never trailed again. Havlicek's
defense also aided in the vicrory
by holding the Cavs' Booby
Smith to six points-10 bel.w
his average.
THE CELTICS outscored the
Cavaliers 28-16 in the thirJ quar-'
ter for a 72-60 advantage as the

final period began. The Cava- Garrett hit two straight baskets.
liers pulled to within 83-'3 on a Reserve Bob Wilson's four bas-'
pair of free throws oy rookie kets sealed Houston's 40th loss
Foots Walker and a lavup by of the year.
Austin Carr. But Cowens iced '
the game on a three-poiit play
seconds later. Braves blaze
BUFFALO - Bob McAdoo
Bullfight went on a third-period scoring
binge to lead the Buffalo Braves
CHICAGO-Bob Love blistered to a 118-103 victory over the
Houston with 29 points and held Philadelphia 76ers.

Roston
Buffalo
New Yorli
Philadelp
Washingt
Cleveland
Holston
Atlanta
New Orne

Atlantic Division
55 21
45 30
k 36 39
hia .34 42,
Central Division
on 55 20
38 39
38 40
30 48
pans 21 54

Pet.
.726
.600
.480
.447
.733
.494
.487
.384
.280

GBH
91 /
18 1
21
18 1
18',
264
34

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division

Furlow clarg1d in
teammate assault,

top-scoring Rudy Tomjanovich
to only two points in leading the
Chicago Bulls to a 112-94 tri-
limph over the Rockets in a
fo'l-laden game.
The Bulls, hitting 14 free
throws in a wild second quarter,
t=rned what could have been a
serious NBA violation into their,
44th victory of the season.
CHICAGO'S Norm Van Lier,
who violently protested his third
foul in the first quarter, had to

McAdoo, the NBA's leading
scorer, hit for 20 of his 48
points in the third quarter, in-
cluding one stretch where he1
scored 16 points in a row for the
Braves. He now has scored 190
points in his last four games,
averaging 47.5.

KC-Onaha
Detroit
Milwaukee
Pacific
Golden State
Seattle
Portland
Phoenix
I.Os Angeles

44
42
37
34

Division
44 32
36 39
35 41
30 45
28 46

31
34
39
41

.587
.553
.487
.453
.579
.480
.4&I
.400
.375

7%
10
9
13Y,
15

Late games not included

' A o

EAST LANSING {P) - As-+
sault and battery charges havet
been filed against Big Ten1
scoring champ Terry Furlow!
by Michigan State teammate
Pete Davis after an incident
during a pickup basketball
game at MSU.
Davis, a 6-foot-1 senior guard
from Brooklyn, N. Y., told the
Ingham County prosecutor's of-
fice Tuesday that Furlow punc-
hed him during the Monday
game.
An assistant coach, w h o

didn't witness the incident, said be restrained from going after
he took Davis to a hospital for referee Mark Mano. Van Lier'
treatment of minor cuts and flew into a rage, knocking over
bruises. . everything on the scorers' table,
Furlow, a 6-5 junior from kicking chairs and swearing:
Flint, has been the center of profusely.
other recent scrapes. The incident erupted after
Ile finished the season on Mano and Darrell Garretsan,
probation from the Big Ten the other referee, refused to
after punching Rick Schmidt of permit three free throws on a
Illinois Feb. 1 during a confer- shooting foul.
ence game. About two weeks HOUSTON RALLIED in the
ago Furlow and a student team fourth quarter, ripping off seven
manager exchanged punches in consecutive points to close the
a locker room altercation. gap to 80-72 before Rowland

.
.;
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rC
'

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i

Nal-

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w Adlh

.: 1 I f J T
.. _., .. . _ __ ..n . _y..
_- . ..
..
_- i

Alm

SMORGASBORD
Wednesdays 6-10 p.m.
AND
Saturdays 6-10 p.m.
$3.95
1. cold vchysoisse
2. coq an vin
3. potatoes anna
4. shrimp newburgh
5. boeuf burguingnone
6. rice
7, swedish meat balls
8. vernicell
9. breaded veal cutlet
10. fresh garden green
11. tarragon peas
12 eggplant parmesan
13. beef oriental
14. veal hearts
15 chicken giblets
16. cheese casserole
17. sliced beef
18. fried chicken
19. barbecued ribs
20. fried cod fish
21. black olives
2a. greek olives
23 green olives
24. dill pickles
25 celery
26 carrots
27. green onions
28. crab apples
29. red peppers
30. radishes
31. corn salad
32. sliced cucumbers
with sour cram
33. sliced tomatoes
with fresh dill
34. red bean salad
35. greek bean salad
36. italian green peppers
37. greek stuffed eggplants
38. sliced beets
39. garlic sauce
40. herring
41. portuguese sardines
42. anchovies
43. cod fish caviar mousse
44. cod fish red caviar
45. liver pate
46. sliced jambon
47 sliced salami
48. sliced cold turkey
49. chicken salad
50. russian fish salad
51. tuna fish salad
52. cottage cheese
53. sliced mushroom in
dill sauce
54. eggrols
55. hot mustard sauce
56. stuffed eggs bonnefeinme
57. cole slaw
58. cold salmon
59. fresh tuna In soya sauce
60. butter
61. home made bread
62. sliced tongue
63. horse radish sauce
64. chicken wings Japanese
65. fried squid
66. smoked pork chops
67. potato salad
68. russian salad
69. macaroni salad
70. jellied fruit salad
71. tossed green salad
72. chef's dressing
73. french dressing
74. 1000 island dressing
75. russian dressing
76. tartar sauce
77. hot sauce
78. bacon crumbs
79. croutons
80. parmesan cheese
81. sliced onions
82. eggplant salad
83. hocktail sausage
84. hors d'oeuvres
85. stuffed grapeleaves
86. greek feta cheese
87. swiss cheese
88. cheddar cheese
89. bread pudding
90. rice pudding
91. creme caramel
92. baked apples

This Week
in Sports
WEDNESDAYj
NHL HOCKEY-Detroit Red Wings
at Atlanta Flames, 7:00 on Channel
50.
GOLF-Cape Coral Invitational at i
Cape Coral, Florida.
THURSDAY
MEN'S SWIMMING - NCAA's at
Cleveland State
GOLF-Cape Coral Invitational at!
Cape Coral, Florida. I
FRIDAY
GYMNASTICS - Big Ten Cham-
pionships at Crisler Arena, Coin-
pulsories, 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.,
Optionals, 7:30.
MEN'S SWIMMING - NCAA's at
Cleveland State.
GOLF-Cape Coral Invitational at
Cape Coral, Florida.
SATURDAY
GYMNASTICS - Big Ten Cham-
pionships at Crisltr Arena, Optional,
10:00 a.m., Individual Finals, 3:00
p.m.
MEN'S SWIMMING - NCAA's at
Cleveland State.
GOLF-Cape Coral Invitational at
Cape Coral, Florida.
RUGBY--Sarna at Michigan, A
game, 1:30, B game 3:00 at Palmer
Field.
SUNDAY
MEN'S SWIMMING - NCAA's at
Cleveland State.
LACROSSE - Michigan at Colum-
bus, 2:00.
NHL HOCKEY - Atlanta Flames
at New York Islanders, 3:00 on
channel 4.
NBA BASKETBALL - Chicago
Bulls at Washington Bullets, 3:00 on
channel 2.'
SCORES
Exhibition Baseball
Montreal 3, Texas 1
Kansas City 5, Boston 4
Cleveland 3, San Diego 2

On Columbia Records and Tapes
THAT'S THE WAY OF THE WORLD
including:
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good thru Sat.
M-Th. 10-9, Fri. 10-midnite, Sat. 10-9, Sun. 12-6
300 S. STATE-665-3679
1235 S. UNIVERSITY-668-9866

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