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March 16, 1975 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-16

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Page SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March l 6,.

1975,

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, March 16, 1975

ISRAEL ALIYAMOBILE
INFORMATION ABOUT ISRAEL
PROGRAMS (Long and Short Term)
I INFORMATION ABOUT WAYS TO MAKE ALIYAH*
* PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
0 SLIDES AND FILMS OF ISRAEL
0 ISRAELI MUSIC
* REFRESHMENTS
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
MICHIGAN LEAGUE-- 10:00 - 4:00
Conference Room D - Third Floor (take elevator)
In the FISHBOWL-10:00 -4:00
at HILLEL -6:00 - 10:00 P.M.
xKibbutz
University Programs
Archeological Digs
wcbn 88.3 fm
;pectacuIa r
Arundayt.-
Special Programs
on wcbn
from 9:00 a.m. to
2:00 Monday morning
GLOBAL VILLAGE
12:30 p.m.: FRENCH MUSIC
1:45: PHONE-IN CONVERSATION with
ALBERT WHEELER, Democratic P a r t y
Candidate for Mayor of Ann Arbor.
HOST: MAURICIO FONT

CLIP AND SAVE
aVa
N
PhMone Number
II
Ci culation 'I
s Phon Nmer
|Classified Adv.
a 764-0557
Disclay Adv
764-0558
News
r 764-0557
e ew
E
Sports
764-0562
" ----."CLIP AND SAVE -----
KOSHER
MEAT KOOP
Ordering for
Pesach Meeting
at NOON, SUN.,
MARCH 16
HILLEL-
1429 Hill Street

I
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e
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I.
I,
U;

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LOOKING

THE WEEK IN REVIEW
SGEO settles nearly 60 union members.
o The Graduate Employes Or-i And behind the scenes, soe
ganization (GEO) and the Uni- union leaders started to doubt
u versity administration finally the strength of their organiza-
* came to terms on a contract tion midway through the styike.
last week and although neither But GEO held on and continued
side won a wholesale victory in to apply pressure to the seem-
the document, the union has de- ingly omnipotent University.
finitely secured its future. Quite obviously the final set-
GEO's lifeblood flows from tlement is a mixed oag. How-
the agency-shop clause in the ever, that a union run by neo-
new contract, which has already phytes, unaffiliated with a n y
Sbeen ratified by the rank and major labor organization, a n d
file membership and will go into ing a size u n
* effect for the 2,200 graduate could win a contract even ap-
teaching, research and staff as- proaching its original expecta-
sistants here. tions must be scored as a vic-
uWith an agency shop provision tory'.
-an item the University bar- In addition to the contract, the
* gaining team fought harder than
any other - the union can col-
t lect dues in the form of a "re-
: presentation fee" from each
a graduate employe on campus ra-
ther than just the card-carry-
i ing GEO members, who number
under 1,200.
* This insures the fledgling, of-
ten faltering, union a steady
source of money to continue its
organizing and promotion - an
all important task to retain the
momentum generated during
the four-week strike th -it end - :
ed with the ratification vrote.
As the walk-out ended, every-
one - students, striking work-
ers, and University officials -
breathed a sigh of relief that
the whole affair was over.
Throughoutfthe actn erthere
had been tense momen-s. Un-
dergraduates faced the decision "
of crossing picket lines V) at-
tend classes that became ever
more vital as exams approach-
ed. Finally most gave into the
pressure and returned before
the strike's end.
Then confrontations between
the graduate employes on those
lines and the local police boiled
over, leading to the arrest of
STED
ITHE 500 GRADUATE Employi

University agreed that no re-
prisals would be taken against
the employes participating in
the walkout and that they would
make up work missed as a re-
sult of the strike. Hopefully this
also means that undergraduates
will be able to recoup their edu-
cational losses.
Many students taking itro-
ductory courses - particularly
foreign languages - have mis-
sed nearly a month of classes
in cumulative subjects. These
are the "by-standers" who have
had to suffer because of the
walkout and whose needs have
yet to be met.
The GEO failed to get t n e
salary and other wage consider-
ations - including tuition re-
bates and freezes - that were
high on the list of priorities. Set-

a

-I

tlements in those areas much
more closely resembled what
the University wanted to grant.
But the union did ~rner a
series of symbolic "vice ories"
as the University accepted con-
tract clauses mandating affirm-
ative action and non-disrim -
ation in hiring, requiring grad-
uate employe input into certain
lepartmental decisions, and grie-
vance procedures.
These provisions will in all
likelihood affect few graduate
employes and were fairly safe
concessions on the University's
part. The administration also
won a few, particularly a con-
tract item preventing the GEO
from staging any sympathy
strikes.
But the bureaucrats could not
kill-off the union.
Consequently the graduate
employes, who previously work-
ed without contracts and virt-
ually at the pleasure 7f their
respective departments, n o w
have a viable organization to
fight on their behalf. And that
is much more important than a
major salary increase.
What has been laid is a foun-
dation for the future. the GEO
leaders themselves, in the same
breath with which they urged
approval of the pact, cautioned
that "the contract is not per-
fect, but it's certainly mnot e
than the University wanted to
give us."
The strike is over. A com-
promise settlement has been
mapped out and approved by
both sides. And everything is
pretty much back to nrmal.
But a year-and-a-half from now
the University will again have to
battle the GEO over a contract
and it won't be easy.
* * *
Arab demo
Rarely, in the past couple of
years, have the local police done
anything other than just watch
demonstrations and protests on
campus. But last Wednesday
they actively broke up a pro-
Arab group that attempted to
disrupt a Rackham Auditorium
speech by Israeli President Ep-
hriam Katzir.
About 100 Palestinian support-
ers heckled Katzir so loudly
that he had to halt his speech
for more than half an hour. Af-
ter repeated warnings to the pro-
testors to either leave or quiet
down, University Robben Flem-
ing requested members of the
Ann Arbor Police Department to
remove the demonstrators from
the auditorium.
One arrest was made, police
reported.
Katzir was on campus to re-
ceive an honorary law degree
from the University.
How To Do
Your Own
Seder
WORKSHOP-
Sun., March 16
2 P.M.
at HILLEL
1429 ILL
663-3336

BACK
The Israeli's presence and the
subsequent demonstration both
evoked fiery responses. "For a
Palestinian, Katzir is Hitler,"
shouted one demonstrator. Of
the placcard-carrying protest
ors, Rabbi Joel Poupko remark
ed: "The behavior of the dis-
rupters was animalistic."
The most disturbing aspect of
the entire affair was the at-
tempt to silence a speaker here
- at a university supposedly
steeped in a tradition of free
thought and free expression.
Too many universities across
the country have limited the
range of guests brought to ad-
dress their academic commun-
ities because of the fear and
threat of disruptions. Luckily
that precedent has not yet been
set here.
Election notes
Just like weather, politics
in Ann Arbor began to heat up
as April and the City Council
elections approach. The jock-
eying by candidates and the fac-
tions supporting and opposing
the various ballot proposals has
gotten more powerful.
In something of a power-play,
the Human Rights Party and
Republican City Council mem-
bers joined forces to pass a has-
tily conceived law allowing can-
didates for city offices to with-
draw and their replacement to
be named by party caucuses.
The ordinance was designed
specifically to let Richard Ank-
i, who won the HRP Second
Wardnomination, to withdra.
He ran a tongue-in-cheek cam-
paign, billing himself as a
"fool" and upset long-time HRP
member Frank Schoichet by a
narrow margin.
Democratic Party members
have announced they will chal-
lenge the legality of the ordin-
ance on the grounds that chang-
es in election procedure should
be instituted as City Charter
amendments.
HRP proposed the ordinance
as a last-ditch attempt to re-
move Ankli's name from t h e
ballot. The party feared that
whatever chance it had to win
the second ward would com-
pletely evaporate if he remain-
ed the candidate.
In other election develop-
ments, the state Attorney Gen-
eral's office questioned the le-
gality of a proposed City Char-
ter Amendment to establish
door-to-door voter registration.
The amendment was planed
on the ballot by a non-partisan
group led by students living in
Allice Lloyd Hall.
Asst. Attorney General Louis
Porter's opinion declares the
measure "subverts state law."
He also argued that the amend-
ment would limit the City
Clerk's power to regulate and
control elections as provided
under state law.
The ruling will not prevent the
measure from appearing on the
April 7 general election ballot
and the amendment's support-
ers regard the opinion as only
"a potential setback."
On yet another front, the city's
landlords are massing a well-
financed attack on the rent con-
trol ballot proposal. Last year
they spent about $6,000 in a suc-
cessful drive to defeat a sim-
ilar charter amendment.
-GORDON ATCHESON

It
1S
written .. .

. . . that working for a
newspaper can be exciting,
frustrating, enjoyable and
refreshing

)aily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
e Organization members cheer

Why Not Join THE DAILY?

PARK
TERRACE
848 Tappan
at Oakland
Deluxe 1 and 2
Bedroom Apartments
See Don or Marilyn Olsen
APT. 10
or call 769-5014

the announcement of a contract settlement during a mass
meeting last Tuesday evening.
416S. Athley --Ann Arbor, Mich. 48103
-V

A great place to meet
about a newspaper on
Staffs

people, drink
the Business,

5c cokes and learn
Editorial or Sports

-

* Serving at our fireside
Hearty Soups, Fine Omelets,
Homemade corn muffins,
pastry, cheesecake.
THICK SANDWICHES
SPECIAL COFFEE-we grind our own
LIVE MUSIC TODAY
STARTING 2 P.M.
BOB MILLER & his guitar
(formerly of Brussel Sprout)
Thursday-Saturday 11-1 a.m.

I

..,w..."

I,

This $15 haircut
mag not be
what gou had
in mind...
MICHIGAN U~iNBARDER~I

"Ljove
thy
enemy...
This is a religious precept that
challenges the mind. Love my en-
emy when I can barely deal calmly
with my in-laws? Yet this hard say-
ing has validity in a world where
even a small act of violence has
such unforeseeable repercussions.
Scientific advances have heighten-
ed our mutual vulnerability. Only
love and non-violence can sustain
us. We may concede violence is in
all of us. So is God. Try His way.
It works. Get together with your
family, friends, neighbors, or co-
workers to discuss the problems of
violence and how you can work to-
gether to help solve them. For a
helpful discussion guide and fur-

A phone call. A simple,
ten-cent phone call for a cab could
save your friend's life.
If your friend has been
drinking too much, he shouldn't

that the drunk drivers responsible
for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take a minute. Spend a
dime. Call a cab. That's all. If you

DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y*
BOX 2345
I ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 I

I want to save a friend's life.

I

,

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