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January 14, 1975 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-14

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Tuesday, January 14,'1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, January 14, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

PURDUE NIPS 'CATS
Indiana rolls on

By The Associated Press .
BLOOMINGTON - Top-rank-
ed and undefeated Indiana, led
by forward Scott May's 19
points, solved Minnesota's tight
zone defense in the second half
last night and rolled over the
16th-ranked Gophers 79-59 in a
Big Ten basketball game. I
The victory was a school re-
cord 18th in a row over two
seasons for Indiana, which has
the nation's longest currenti
winning string, and gave ther
Hoosiers a 4-0 conference re-j
cord and 15-0 overall mark forI
the season.
MINNESOTA, topped by
freshman Mark Olberding's 23
points and Mike Thompson's 16
points, fell to 3-2 in the Bigs
Ten and 10-3 overall.
After Indiana forced the;
Gophers from the zone with a1
semi-stall late in the game, the
Hoosiers outscored the visitors
21-4 and blew the game wide

S P orts
NIGHT EDITOR.
RICH LERNER
ed five of Purdue's last six
points last night as the Boiler-
makers took a 73-72 overtime
victory from Northwestern in
Big Ten basketball.
JORDAN, who finished with
13 points tying with frosh Eu-
gene Parker for Purdue high
point honors, gave the Boiler-
makers a lead that seemed good
enough to win the game in reg-
ulation time, 64-60.
But Bob Svete put in two
straight field goals to tie the
game and send it into overtime.
Purdue had the ball leading 64-
62 with eight seconds left but
turned the ball over on a be-
hand-the-back-pass.
SVETE then tied it.
Tim Teasley, the game's
leading scorer with 19, scored
six of Northwestern's eight ov-
ertime points, putting the visi-
tors up, 70-67.
But Parker hit a field goal,
Jordan added another on a fast

3i
1
i
;I
1
I'.

open.
Hoosier center
added 17 points
Steve Green 14
Bobby Knight
bench late in the

Kent Benson
and forward
before Coach
cleared the
game.

Ii
5
i
I
k

Purdue
W E S
Freshman

pops
T LAFAYETTE -
Walter Jordan scor-

i
(i
I

Sull court
_ RESS ~ -

break, then hit the winning free
throws after being fouled with
18 seconds to go.
Purdue began to build a lead
early in the first half, and had
an 11 point spread. But North-
western closed to 35-32 before
the Boilermakers moved back
out to a 40-34 halftime edge.
T H E BOILERMAKERS'
first 17 points were scored by
freshmen-Parker, Jordan and
Wayne Walls.
In the second half, North-
western scored 12 of the first 16
points and moved out to a 46-44
lead. The Wildcats managed to
build the margin to four points,
50-46, but the teams traded bas-
kets the rest of the way.
The victory was Purdue's
fourth in five Big Ten games,
for a 9-4 mark overall. North-
western dropped to 1-3 and 3-9.
* * *
Bucke yes Bonk
COLUMBUS - BillAn-
dreas, one of five Ohio State
double - figure scorers, hit nine
points in a row late in the game
to help the Buckeyes pull away
to a 94-77 Big Ten basketball
victory over Iowa last night.
A N D R E A S, despite play-
ing with four personal fouls,
personally swelled the Ohio
State margin to 74-62 with less
than six minutes to play.
The game was a ragged one
in which 55 personal fouls were
called and the two sides com-
mitted 43 turnovers, 34 of the
errors by the Hawkeyes.
LARRY BOLDEN poured in
18 points, Andreas 17, Craig
Taylor 16, Andy Stiegemeier 13
and Mark Bayless 10 for Ohio
State, 2-2 in the conference and
8-6 overall.
Mlini ignite
CHAMPAIGN - Otho
Tucker scored 29 points, 20 of
them in the first half last
night, to lead Illinois to a 72-56
Big Ten basketball victory over
winless Wisconsin.
The victory was the second
straight for the Illini and hiked
their Big Ten record to 2-3 and
6-6 overall while Wisconsin
slumped to 0-4 in the confer-
ence and 3-8 for the season.
W I S C O N S I N led 15-14
early in the game when Mike
Washington hit a jumper to put
Illinois ahead to stay at 16-15.
Illinois boosted the advantage
to 36-26 at the half.
Illinois took a 40-26 lead early
in the second half but Wis-
consin, with Pete Brey hitting
three baskets, scored 10
straight points to cut the lead
to 40-36. The Illini then replied
with 10 straight points for a 50-
36 advantage and coasted the
rest of the way.
Big Ten
Standings

AP Photo
INDIANA guard Bob Wilkerson keeps the heat on Minnesota's Phil Saunders early in the first
h!lf of last night's game at Assembly Hall in Bloomington. The Hoosiers, ranked first in the
nation, went on to win the contest 79-59. The Gophers were ranked 16th. The loss drops their
record to 10-3 overall.

Transcendental Meditation
as taught by
MAHARISHI
M MAHESH YOGIf
@ "Provides deep rest
as a preparation for
dynamic activity"
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE '<
THURS., JAN. 16 y{
8 P.M.
Mchian Union
Kuentzel Room
for additional information call 761 -8255
IT'S NOT TOO LATE
You Can Still Enroll
in Military Science.
Why Take'Army
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CONTACT the CHAIRMAN
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DO IT TODAY!

Hope springs eternal . .-"-
. for slumping Wolverines,
By BILL STIEG
APPARENTLY, THE Ann Arbor Optimists Club has opened aE
new branch-at Crisler Arena.
Despite two losses in a row, and a difficult road trip ahead,
the Wolverines show no signs of giving up, and some could evens
find a silver lining in their current slump.
"These two losses should have a good effect," said co- 1
captain Joe Johnson yesterday. "It could help us pull together."
The squad's other senior, co-captain C.J. Kupec, claimede
that things could be worse.e
"It could really have hurt if we didn't have the charac-V
ter we have," maintained Kupec. "This team is too matureI
to say 'hang it up' now.td s
Though the team is trying hard to put Saturday's loss to
Michigan State behind it, and concentrate on this weekend's
trip to Iowa and Minnesota, it should be a while before the East
Lansing nightmare is forgotten. The game was an exercise in c
frustration, replete with missed opportunities and dumb mis-s
takes.b
"We watched the films last night for three and a half hours,"v
said head coach Johnny Orr, sighing like a movie director who 3
just can't get a scene to work right. r'
"We had the chances," he explained, "but we blew
them by missing free throws and layups. We still thought
we had a chance as late as two minutes left.
"As badly as we were playing, State wasn't playing much
better. We should have been blown out by twenty or thirty
points, but State kept turning it over and over."
Orr went on to explain that Michigan's defense on the
weak side, away from the ball, is especially hurting the team.
The players are doing well when their man has the ball, he
said, but have a tendency to lose track of him when the ball isf
passed to the other side of the court.
"We made mistakes at crucial times," he added. "They
made mistakes, too, but not at crucial times."
The consecutive losses haven't caused Orr to hit thej
panic button, but there will be some changes made. Tof
start with, Orr has decided to close practices for a couple
of days, in the tradition of Bo Schembechler.
"We'll go back to fundamentals," Orr stated. "And we'll
try to remember how we won and were a good team last year."
Yesterday's practice was agrueling session of drills, topped
with 21 wind sprints-one for every point State scored over
the team's defensive goal of 65.
Kupec saw some encouraging signs in yesterday's work-
out. "Today's practice showed a resurgence of our old
form," he observed. "Playing two, three games a week,
has hurt us," pointing out that yesterday was the first real
workout in a long time. For more than a month, the prac-
tices had been prearation for upcoming games.
Orr and his staff also plan to straighten out some smallerr
problems, from havingsthe players get to practice earlier to
keeping the locker room neater. Little things like that, main-
tains Orr, can sometimes add up to more serious trouble. }
. During practice, the coaches and players will "break down"
defense and offense, trying to rebuild some of the plays that
have deteriorated over the first twelve games.
Included in Orr's plans are some new offensive patterns
designed to get more points out of Kupec.
"Last year," Orr recalled, "someone would have tof
go over and help out against Campy (Russell), and leave
C.J. open for a shot. But now they're not bothering the
others as much, and C.J. is having trouble.
"We'll put a couple things in this week to free him, be-
cause he's our best shooter."
For the Wolverines' sake, the changes will hopefully work,
and can be used this weekend against Iowa-no pushover,
especially in Iowa City-and sixteenth-ranked Minnesota. With
two Big Ten losses already, they can't afford any more games
like the last couple, and still hope for an NCAA berth.
This year, runners-up in the major conferences can be
considered for placement in the Regionals along with at-large
teams. A strong second-place finish can then give a team a
shot at the national championship.
"For us to win the conference championship," admits Orr,
"would be very difficult. We do have an excellent chance to go
to a post-season tournament, though."
Indeed, Michigan's non-conference mark of 7-1 allows it to
lose a handful of Big Ten games and still own a won-lost record
-A 6sn, .. r 44.,..ft a r A nr .NTT tnr nm nt

Woien
UPThe Michigan women's bas-
ketball team opens its season
tonight as they travel to Ypsi-
lanti to meet Eastern Michi-
gan's squad. The women play,
an eight game season, with
their first home action coming
January 22 against MSU
Carmen Border Is a first-
year head coach, and Mary
Ellen Ranker is her assist-.
ant. Richard Carter, the'
men's Varsity Reservercoach,
!will act as a "liaison person",
according to Marie Hartwig,
women's rt i ;iidirector.
The team hopes to improve
on lst year's disappointing
season. Losses include star
guard Lydia Sims, who trans-
ferred to Immaculata College,
winner of last year's national
championship.

SUMMER JOBS For JUNIORS
IN PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY
AND ENGINEERING
The Department of Engineering and Applied
Science of Yale University is offering a limited
number of Special Grants to college juniors
who would like to gain experience in advanced
research this summer.
Available projects include work involving
environmental studies, acoustics, biochemistry,
biomechanics, surface chemistry and catalysis,
solid state physics, magnetism atomic physics,
fluid dynamics, pattern recognition.
Stipends will be about $110 a week and will
be awarded for an 11-week period from
June 2 through August 15, 1975.
For further details and aDrdication forms
please contact your department office, dean's
office, or placement office, or write to:
Summer Research Program
Department of Engineering and Applied Science
Yale University
New Haven, Connecticut 06520
or call (203) 436-2671
Completed applications are due Pebruary 15, 1975

2.
2.
3.
4.
5.1
6.1
7.
8.
9.1
10.

Con-
ference
W L
Indiana 4 0
Purdue 4 1
Minnesota 3 2
MICHIGAN 2 2
Michigan State 2 2
Ohio State 2 2
Illinois 2 3
Iowa 2 3
Northwestern 1 3
Wisconsin 0 4

All
W L
1S 0
9 4
10 3
9 3
8 3
8 6
6 6
39
3 8

_ IE

SCOR ES

Purdue 73, Northwestern 72 (
Ohio State 94, Iowa 77
Indiana 79, Minnesota 59
Illinois 72, Wisconsin 56
Kentucky 88, Tennessee 82
Pitt 84, Notre Dame 77 (o.t.)
Auburn 84, Florida 68
Oral Roberts 98, Okia. City 80
Virginia 58, Davidson 56

a.t.> -j-
Lost and found:
Lost: One football player,
somewhere between Honolulu,
Middletown, Ohio and Ann
Arbor.

THIS WiNTER, TAKE A
20 MINUTE VACATION

Campus interviews
(Monday, January 27)
OFFERING THE CHALLENGES of diversified, advanced-
technology programs that typically range from telecom-
munications, radar and TV systems, advanced computers
and data processing equipment, microwave systems, infra-
red systems and navigation systems, to lasers and electro-
optics.
OFFERING OPPORTUNITY for steady career growth based
on the strong foundation provided by United Aircraft; and
an outstanding Connecticut countryside location on Long
Island Sound near many educational, recreational, cultural
and living attractions.
Opportunities are typically for graduates in:

Transcendental Meditation (TM) provides
a deep rest and leaves you feeling refresh-
ed, relaxed and lively. It is practice for 20
minutes twice a day and is easily learned
in four short sessions.
TM: THE YEAR plus
ROUND VACATION
Introductory Lecture
Thursday, Jan. 26
8 P.M., IKueizel Roomi

va a ca' Lion: a scheduled
period, during which activity
is suspended; an intermission
or rest.

M.E.& E.E.-
M.E. & I.E.-
Computer Science -

for responsibilities in design
and development engineering.
for our Operations Development
Training Program (Manufactur-
ing Engineering).
for varied involvement in sophis-
ticated EDP applications and
internal services.

i

II

44 1;jy t is '4: ,.K,:;(4% [: 1 1S:"[S

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