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March 16, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Women dies in 67-ft. fall

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-

The New and Exciting
Coral ┬žat//,;iPOINT
AFTER
DANCING DNN
NIGHTLY DINING
Featuring Top 40 Groups T
direct from New York Ch -
ccao, Kansas City, Los An -
oeles, Washington.
" Posh complete game room LUNCH Daily 11 a.m.
" Small unique shops DINNERS from 5 p.m.
" Banquet facilities SNACKS
" Complete menu till midnight
2952200 _
22509 ECORSE ROAD
Located in Taylortown Shopping Center
ONLY 20 MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN

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5

MMMS

G1(1
19i(, 9i

(Continued from Page 1)
miles from Ann Arbor.
University records show that
Calderone was registered as a
sophomore in the literary col-
lege last fall and had a local
Prospect St. address.
Her telephone has been dis-
Frisbee h
(Continued from Page 1)
FREESTYLE IS a "more
cooperative than competitive"
display of agility and speed in
tossing the frisbee, or frisbees,
between players commented
Margie Meiswick of Tawas City,
a member of the Humbly Mag-
nificent Champions of the Uni-
verse (HMCU).
Meiswick, who is featured in
the March 1975 issue of Women
Sports, took second in the wo-
men's distance event with a
toss of 44 meters. First in dis-
tance was taken by Jo Cahow,
with a fling of 56 meters. Ca-
how, featured in W o men' s
Sports with Meiswick, is the
current Women's World Champ'
and also a member of the Ann
Arbor-based HMCU.
Two men threw the new hard-
er plastic model of the Profes-
sional Whammo Frisbee the full
SUNDAY NITE
ONLY
Singer Songwriter
k BILL !
STEELE
wrote "GARBAGE"
and other great songs.
$2.50
IO141 l I RIISRE
W'ing'

connected, and no Calderone
was listed at the Prospect ld-
dress last night.
NEIGHBORS of the Calder-I
one family had no answers lastI
night as to whether the dark-
haired young woman might have
ins frolic
length of the main gym of the;
I-M Bldg. For this feat, first
place was awarded to John Con-
nally of Evanston, Ill., a mem-
ber of the "Highland Ave Aces
High" frisbee team that finished
tops for t h r e e consecutive
years at the International Fris-
bee Tournament held annually
in Marquette, Mich.

committed suicide-miles from
her home and on one of the
lovliest days of the year.
"She was kind of just her-
self," one neighbor said. "She
liked to know people-she was
an outgoing person." The neigh-
bor, who wished to remain
ananymous, said she had known
the victim for "several years
and she spent a lot of time" in
Ann Arbor.
Another neighbor, a friend of
the Calderone f a m ii y, said
Kathy was "a' good girl. We
liked her very much."
Yesterday's victim was rot
the first to fall from the Thomp-
son Street structure.
In September, 1972, a local
resident named Richard Illy
fell from the fourth floor of the
building. Illy, who suffered se-
vere head and abdominal in-
juries, survived the fall.
1 draws
Lcrowd
ran smoothly," he said, but ex-
plained that he would "improve
the conference process next
time around."
"The conference only cave a

:unday, March 16 ,915
Greek shipping king
Onassis dies at 69
By The AP and Reuter
PARIS-Aristotle Onassis, one of the world's richest men,
died of bronchial pneumonia in the American hospital here
yesterday. He was 69.
His wife Jacqueline, widow of President John Kennedy, was
in New York when he died, but his only daughter Christina was
at his bedside.
A HOSPITAL communique said he died "from a broncho-
pulmonary infection which was impossible to control. . .."
Jean-Yves Perchat, director general of the hospital in
suburban Neuilly, said Onassis died without suffering. His con-
dition had deteriorated during the night and doctors gave up
hope of saving him some 90 minutes before the end.
Onassis, who parlayed the $60 his father gave him at 16 into
a shipping and airline empire estimated far in excess of $600
million, will be buried on his Greek island of Scorpios, sources in
Greece said. Family friends said the "obvious" site was next to
the grave of his son Alexander, who died as the result of a
plane crash two years ago.
WHEN HE DIED Greek magnate Aristotle Onassis was
estimated to be worth at least $600 million.
He owned and operated 59 Panamanian flag vessels and one
Greek flag vessel-45 tankers and 14 cargo ships-through three
companies, Springfield, Centra American Steamship Agency and
Olympic Maritime.
He built his fleet steadily through the boom and bust cycles
of the oil trade, the last bust developing as Onassis became
increasingly affected by myasthenia gravis, a weakening of the
muscles, that contributed to the bronco-pulmonary infection that
doctors said killed him.
His 24-year-old daughter Christina is believed to inherit the
controlling interest in the shipping companies.
Sources close to the family said his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis, had received a settlement at the time of their marriage
to provide for the two Kennedy children through a trust fund,
with cash for herself and unlimited expenses while Onassis lived.
Ford softens stand
on aid to Cambodia

I

'VegetaBa

Rautiful loser

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Beautiful Loser; Black Night;
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Limits; Sailing Nights; Fine
Memory.
c$.3,99
thru Sat.
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665-3679
1235 S. UNIVERSITY
668-9866

(Continued from Page 1)
to the guests by Nancy and
Francie Bananas, the "top ban-
anas" at the event.
BEER AND cider were served
as members from the Road-
show performed Marx Brothers
take-offs and other amusing
skits. The performers, although
not responsible for any of the
music, added a unique and at-
tention-getting feature to the
Ball with their crazy antics and
eccentric costumes.
Among the guests last night'
was Carter Schelling from Ecol-
ogy Action, who spoke at the
Future World's lecture earlier
in the week. "The conference
DR. PAUL USLAN
Optometristj
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 Church 663-2476
+ -I

one-way flow of information,"
Carter said. He suggested they
"increase the dimension of the
conference next year."
The local Food Action Coali-
tion organized Food Week to ed-
ucate and get the public actively
involved in working to help
solve the world-wide food crisis.
Ann Arbor led the country in
the nation-wide observance for
EFood Day, scheduled April 17.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 131
Sunday, March 16, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104, Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio):
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Sunner session published Tues-
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
Mcam pus area); $6.00 local mail
Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).
day through Saturday morning.

(Continued from Page 1)
from existing U.S. stocks, with
no strings attached. It was due
to consider this idea tomorrow.
A plan to give $82.5 million
worth of arms and ammunition
-$27.5 million a month for
three months-plus $53 million
in food assistance, was proposed
in the House Foreign Affairs
Committee. The aid would have
been hedged with tight restric-
tions, including a cutoff of all
military aid by June 30.
The committee narrowly de-
feated this plan by 18 votes to
15 on Thursday..Senior Republi-
can members blamed the defeat
on Acting Secretary of State
Robert Ingersoll who testified
on the administration's request
in the absence of Secretary of

State Henry Kissinger in the
Middle East.
Ingersoll, the State Depart-
ment's number two official, ap-
parently felt he could not budge
from the administration's posi-
tion that any cut-off date would
cause the Khmer Rouge insur-
gents to "sit tight" and refuse
to negotiate.
"Mr. Ingersoll made a very
serious mistake," Representa-
tive William Broomfield of
Michigan, the committee's top
Republican, said.
He and Representative Pierre
DuPont, a Delaware Republi-
can who helped draft the pro-
posed compromise, believed
that had Ingersoll been more
flexible the bill would have been
approved.

t

M-Th: 10-9
F: 10-midnight

Sat:
Sun:

10-9
12-6

t

A Special Offer!
AVAILABLE
THROUGH THIS
NEWSPAPER

people who can:

THE OFFICIAL ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALMANAC 1975

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LEADERSHIP SEARCH
accepting applications for
ASSISTANT P. R. VICE-PRESIDENT
and
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Musket Mediatrics
Soph Show UAC Travel
Children's Theater Affairs
Artists & Craftsmen Guild
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Aptlications Available at
UAC Office, 2nd floor Michigan Union
DEADLINE MARCH 21

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