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March 15, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-15

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Saturday, Morch 15, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage Five

I

FILM FESTIVAL
Lonflict fills

Thursday bill

Chw'cA W'v'4if e'Oice4

Congress, meat packing
take some knocks
By DAVID WEINBERG
Whew! It was weird night at the Ann
Arbor Film Festival on Thursday, as
that spectacle moved into its third day..
Actually, there were some good solid
representatives of sanity in the Thurs-
day night edition of the festival (a most
detailed biography of Alexander Eiffel,
for example), but when surrounded by
such strangeness as Plastopornicon, or
Moo Moons, they more often seemed to
have been taken accidentally from
some entirely different film festival.
If there was any overriding theme of
Thursday's showing, perhaps it was
the interaction of man and nature's
spirits: modern man's perverse habits
and attitudes towards the world around
him. In some cases, as in Konstantin
Petrochuk's Moo Moons, it it man
intruding dangerously and foolishly up-
on nature. In others, such as Alan Be-
attle's Boarded Window, it is nature
who intrudes upon man.
Moo Moons, Konstantin Petrochuk's
mysterious and dichotomous film alter-
nates between shots of the moon, inter-
views with a farmer whose job it is to
breed cows, and some shots from a
slaughterhouse.
In the disturbing alternation between
the shimmering and surreal shots of
the moon, and the grotesque shots
from the slaughterhouse, Petrochuk
succeeds in horrifying and haunting the
viewer in exploring how man ravages
nature around him, using the cow as
his case in point.
One starts wishing, indeed, that the
pathetic beasts could jump over the

moon. Moreover, no one receives the
disquieting feeling that they know ex-
actly what is going on, but are help-
less to prevent it.
Alan Beattie's The Boarded Window
ed Murdock. Having prepared his wife
for burial, he falls asleep in the room
where she lays, and during the night
a marauding animal jumps through the
open cabin window and mutilates her
body. The ending brought several
gasps from the audience as the forest
and nature seemed to take reprisal
against Murdock.
But perhaps the most absorbing con-
tribution to the evening was both quite
sane and quite unrelated to the afore-
mentioned gruesome theme of nature's
revenge.
Bald Eagle Film Corporation's Who
Shot Alexander Hamilton? proved to
be a fascinating and insightful docu-,
ment about daily life on Capitol Hill
during the Watergate-filled spring and
summer of 1973.
Linked by some very funny com-
ments by Sam Ervin, and some very
idiotic ones by Democrat James Abou-
resk, the film probed intrepidly into
what somehow appeared to be into
guts of Congress.
Perhaps in a way Hamilton never
quite arrives. But somehow, between
the ballgame craziness, the deepening
of Watergate, something very poignant
emerges from this film.
And when for just a second there is
a quick cut and the filmmakers sit be-
fore us and one says "Well, where do
we go from here?", it seems to hit a
sensitive nerve, and it is this question
that echoes from the film.

was a curiously powerful allegory
about a recently widowed hunter nam-
From the 7 o'clock showing, Eternal
Cycles and Moo Moons definitely domi-
nated. Cycles, a work by Arnie Wong,
was an animated three minute short.
Wong's inkings were beautiful and the
careful blend of sound and color gave
a very convincing feeling of man's
movement and evolution.
Naughty Words and Cirque Memoire
were two other short but well-executed
works on Thursday evening's schedule.
Words was a Curt McDowell work cov-
ering the gamut of cinematic profanity.
Larry Huston's Cirque was a beauti-
fully sensual vision of circus perform-
ance capture in photographic silhou-
ettes.
In all, Thursday Night at the festival
was by turns an absorbingly aesthetic
and soundly sane experience, combin-
ing at its best some startling visions
of humanity and its strained ties with
nature - if with an occasional "weird"
touch.
The art of montage
(or lack thereof)
By CHRIS KOCHMANSKI
If last night's 7:00 showing at the Ann
Arbor Film Festival is any indication
of the condition of the creative urge,
then surely some of America's artists
and filmmakers have become exceed-
ingly lazy.
In no single entry of the two-hour
program did I detect even a germ of a
unifying thought or idea. Indeed the
very intention of each film appeared

to be one of juxtaposing the most
totally irrelated shots imaginable.
One film, Michael Tarr's Shim, dis-
played a genuine sense of humor, if not
inspiration. Shim presented us with an
incredibly ugly boxer puppy happilyC
consuming a bowl of spaghetti and
meatballs . . . as if the star of a
Purina Dog Chow commercial.
The image created quite an initial
shock, and its humor did not wane
over the remainder of the two-minute
running time. Tarr wisely kept his
admittedly rather senseless exercise
short, a quality that was sorely lacking
in the majority of the night's offerings.
Curt McDowell was represented again
with Beaver Fever, a film that prom-
ised a lot by its title but in fact de-
livered little by way of the pornogra-
phic bad taste he's noted for.
Nonetheless, Fever at least attempted
to tell a story-in direct opposition to
the standards the other films set. The
feeble yet happily existent humor
emerges in the last minute or so of the
film, but it was little consolation to the
hissing, disgruntled festival patrons.
Still, Fever was an island of joy in
the midst of what elsewise was pretty
pretentious mediocrity. Michel Negro-
ponte's Sequence was a frustrating and
downright dull montage of multiply ex-
posed close-ups of eyeballs, breasts and
candles. And then there was Susan
Zelg's Song and Bag, a one-minute film
of a man emerging from a large white
bag--three times.
Song and Bag nicely summarized the
bland combined focus of Friday's early
presentations. But I'm still wondering
just what the significance of that focus
might be.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN I
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and,
at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
Evening at 10:00.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worsip.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-I
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
10:00 a.m. - Sunday Worship'
Service.
e *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Sundays at noon: Holy Eucha-
rist with a meal following.
, *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerl u Lutheran Student

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service
and Church School.
6:00 evening service.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday;
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
years.
Reading Room -306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat.1
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30t
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a I1
662-9928.
* * * 1
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service.
Sermon: "The Leper."
6:00 p.m. - Evening Service.
Guest Speaker: Dr. Dick Van
Halsema, President of the Re-
formed Bible College.
* * *
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion!
and Sermon.I

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday: 5 p.m. and midight.
Sunday: 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. 'North Campus).
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Communion at 8:30 a.m. in
the Chapel.
Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.-Church School for
all ages, Nursery Care. Sermon:
The Trouble With Riches," by
Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
10:30-11:00 a.m. - Fellowship
Hour in Wesley Lounge.
Worship Service is broadcast
over WNRS (1290 AM) each
Sunday from 11:00 to 12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION:
Sunday, March 16:
4:30 p.m. - Program: "The
Philosophical and Socio-Theolog-
ical Elements in P e a n u t s,"
Lounge.
6:00 p.m.-Dinner, Pine Room.
6:45 p.m. - Celebration,
Lounge.
Thursday, March 20:
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grad din-
ner and program at David Ri-
gan's, 1400 White Street.

Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at hill St.
Unre spon Esive cr owlimits ordn ad, Pastor
Unrepon ive rol"U~attm t Sun day Service atr10.30 a.in.

Monday is Guest Night
You & a Guest-Only $2.50
Todoy at 1 -3-5-7-9 p.m.
Mon. at 7 and 9 only

Michigan Daily

Mayall's UAC blues show

ts

i. 1

BRIDGE:

Declarer lands
contract through
careful play
by FRANK BEL.

Playing in a local team-of-
four event, I picked up the
South hand. Taking the chance
of being passed out, I opened
one heart instead of two clubs.
After a rather confused auction
I found myself in six hearts.
NVuI.

4
+

NORTH
J 9 8
10 6 2
10 3
K 9 8 6 4

WEST EAST
A Q106 A 7 4 3
V Q95 V 73
J76 Q982
4. AQ103 4J752
SOUTH
A A K 5 2
V A K J 8 4
# A K 5 4
4 VOID
The bidding:
SouthdWest North East
1V Pass 1NT Pass
24 Pass 3V Pass
4# Pass 4V Pass
54 DBL 5V Pass
6V Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: Ace of clubs.
West led the ace of clubs, and
I paused to study the dummy.
Well, the opening lead certainly
did not hurt. Now I will be ableI
to pitch one of my spades on
the king of clubs. It looks as if}
I will have to ruff a couple of
diamonds in the dummy and
then pick up the heart suit.
Both follow to the ace and
king of diamonds and I success-
fully ruff a third diamond in
dummy. Cashing the king of
clubs, I sluff a spade and ie-
turn to my hand by ruffing an-
other club with the eight of
hearts.

Now I cash my ace and king
of spades and lead my last dila-
mond. Left hand opponent stu-
dies this for a moment and
throws the queen of clubs. I
ruff and lead another club, hop-
ing that West had started with
five clubs, but I have no such
luck as East follows with the
jack of clubs.
Well, I must ruff this trick
with the king of hearts and see
what develops. West looks un-
happy and throws his queen of
spades. I lead my remaining
spade, and West ruffs and is
forced to lead into my ace-jack
of hearts.
As it turns out the con'ract
was unbeatble after the lead of
the club ace. If West ruffs the
fourth diamond with the heart
queen I can sluff dummy's last
spade and ruff my remaning
spade with the ten of hearts.
If I had drawn even one round
of trump, West would have been
able to ruff the fourth dia mnd
with his heart queen and return
a heart, leaving me with a los-
ing spade.
THE ANN ARBOR FILM
CO-OP will hold open meet-
inas on March 16, 23 &
30th for those interested in
joinina our board If you
want to participate in vari-
ous film activities, "film
showinas, festivals, organi7-
ing film makers," please
come see us Sun., March 16
at 4:00 p.m. in Blagdon
Room at the Michiqan
League.

By HARRY HAMMITT
It is a shame when promoters
drop two name bands into a
concert slot without any regard
for the type of music those
bands play and the type of au-
dience to which they will ap-
peal.
With this type of haphazard
promoting, one of the bands will
often find themselves facing an
audience that has almost no
interest in what the band is
playing. This is substantially
what happened at Crisler Thurs-
day night when UAC paired
John Mayall with Earth, Wind,
and Fire.
Mayall has been an important
figure in the blues movement
for the past decade, and now he
is playing a brand of California
blues which is very easy-going
and approachabe, with definite
potential for rocking. But the
audience never really gave him
a chance, and his music was
not slick or forceful enough to
overcome that sort of antipa-
thy.
Mayall and his band really
are superb musicians, but on
Thursday, they were all too will-
ing to play the perfunctory
solos, staying somewhat aloof
of their own music and never
getting involved in it. This
seemed particularly true with
keyboardist Jay Spell and gui-
tarist Rick Vito who only seem-
ed to be going through the mo-
tions.
There were few surprises
during Mayall's set; since he
seemed quite content to play
material from his latest album,
in essentially the same form as

recorded. Co-vocalist Dee Mc-
Kinnie had a solo spot on a
slow blues tune, "I Never Loved
A Man (Like I Loved You),"
which was done quite compe-
tently but not outstandingly.
After too many days on the
road, the band just seemed dis-
interested. The solos were often
superficial, and McKinnie's
voice became increasingly
screechy while Mayall's began
to give out just enough so that
he couldn't reach all the notes
and sang off-key.
In all, the band really failed
to live up to their potential, and
their performance in front of
a disinterested audience was
lackluster.
Earth, Wind, and Fire was
a different story altogether. It
was quickly obvious that most
of the audience had come to see
them, and with the crowd firm-
lv on their side the group put
on an exciting, high-energy
show.
Starting with a puff of smoke
and a cosmic introduction, the
band launched into a set of
powerful surging soul - rock
which just begged for the au-
dience to get up and dance.
Earth, Fire, and Wind band
has taken the concepts of tra-
ditional soul music, particular-
ly as exemplified by performers
like James Brown, and fused it
with rock energy, throwing in
Latin percussion influence on
the side.
The entire basis of the group
is rhythm. There is relatively
little emphasis on melody in the
traditional sense, except as that
melody is improvised through

the vocals and sometimes punc-
tuated with some dazzling horn
riffs.
The band's singing proved to
be quite effective. The lead
vocalists had strong soulful
voices, while all other members
were able to chip in with
smooth harmonies that fit per-
fectly with the surging rhythms.
The band just refused to lag
at any time and the audience
was with them all the way. It is
unlikely that there has been any
performance that was any more
powerful, persuasive, and well-
crafted in Ann Arbor for some
time.
Indeed, Earth, Wind, and
Fire came into town and blew
the audience over with a feel-
ing that was totally appreciated
by all in attendance. What May-
all lacked in opening to hostil-
ity, Earth, Wind, and Fire made
up in sheer power and stage
presence.
In 1972-73, the University
awarded 13,178 degrees, certifi-

make

interesting

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Bargain
Hunters

reading

Wi-l

cates

and commissions.

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THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

Young
Frankenstein
See It Backwards-You
Won't Be Scared"'
* PLUS *
1.0 Wait Disney Productions 0 4m
and-MEL BROOKS as
"THE CRITIC"

This Weekend onlyl
SPECIAL MATINEE
"BLACK BEAUTY"
Shows at 1 & 3 p.m.
Today at 5-7-9 p.m.
Open at 12:45

FRED LBUs

For

I.

W103 QUADROCK
is giving away
103 new record albums

''I

I MOM="

1

To win just listen to

0
I
a
3
a
A
f
I ;MM u
I
A
1

tA murder a day
keeps the
landlord away!
Cinema Entertainment CorporatiO
presents
SAn Avco Embassy Release ./
Prints by Movielab

,y ." S . ,a.
' _ ...

Today at 1 -3-5-7-9 p.m.
Open at 12:45
"STAVISKY is one of the
most rewarding films I've
seen this year."
---Nora Savre,
New York Times

PASSOVER SEDERS
and MEALS
SEDERS-7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26-$8.50
THURSDAY, MARCH 27-$8.50
MEALS
THURSDAY, MARCH 27 through

-~ I

2'1RUG" "d q 9>.+k"''FS 4s )C:'4' A'4'Y S!"O i

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