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March 12, 1975 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-12

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Wednesday, March 12, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, March 12, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page seven

GEO suspends strike

Food

Voter plan blasted

(Continued from Page 1) ,
perfect," acting union Presi-t
dent Aleda Krausse told the
members, "but it's more than
the community ever thought we
would get, and it's certainly
more than the University;
wanted to give us."
Fleming claimed the walkoout
delayed a settlement. "It's at
contract that we could have;
agreed upon a long time ago,
he said. "We would have been!
prepared to settle long ago ex-4
cept on agency shop which i
ended up coming ouot of fact-
finding."
GEO leaders said yesterday'
that while they did not win the
monumental contract they or-
iginally promised their menm-
bers, they gained favorable pro-
visions on the issues they con-}1
sidered most important, and'
voiced their intentions to push
for more in the future.
"We've gotten most of the3
things the membership really
wants," said Gordon. "I think
the contract is a very good be-a
ginning. We didn't get every-
thing we wanted but no union
ever does, especially the first
time around.
"WE WON very strong union
security," he continued. "We1
won a strong non-discrimina-
tion clause but not as strong
as we would have liked. I'ma
sure next time around we'll be
pushing for more categories in,
that clause, like non-discrimi-
nation on the basis of political,
beliefs.
"We have the beginnings of a ,1
tuition waiver, and on agency
shop and unit recognition I
think we did what our consti-
tuency wanted. What we're do-
ing from here is to make sure j
the University implements our '
contract and we'll be building
our strength for the next time'l
around," he concluded.
GEO negotiator Mark Kaplan1

hinted yesterday afternoon that tuition.
the union will be prepared to
go back out on strike for future A SI
demands. the net
when a
"OUR MOTTO isn't 'Never tween1
again,"' he said. "This isn't the fall ter
ultimate agreement." year u
The tentative contract con- With
tains 23 complex articles steep- for tui
ed in labor technicalities and tions a
cautious wording. Several of the pointm(
articles, agreed upon long be- - mad
fore the strike propelled the and a{
union to prominence on campus, pointmn
have been all but forgotten even With
though they are of considerable fect ne
importance. GSA w
A summary of the major half-tie
clauses follows: $3232.
-Wages. Included in the con- pointm
tract is a guarantee of the eight half-tin
per cent increase retroactive to -A
September, 1974 which the Uni- clause
versity granted on January 28 the un
of this year. A sore spott
throughout the negotiations, the ually i
increase was hotly debated for GSA e
weeks before the administration pay a
decided to grant it without re- O
turning the issue to the bargain-jFO
ing table. after r
I ri n

GNIFICANT increase in
t income of GSAs is seen
a comparison is imade be-
the income for tae 1974
rrm and the income next
nder the new contract.
all adjustments made
tion and other considera-
GSA with a quarter ap-
nent - 10 hours per week
de $724 for the fall term,
GSA with a half-time ap-
tent made $2,544.
the new contract in ef-
ext year, the quarter-time
will make $1176 and the
ne appointee will make
The averageGSA ap-
nent is slightly under
me.
ency shop. The shop
ensures the security of
ion in the future. Event-
t will provide that every
either join the union or
service fee.
A PERIOD of one year
atification of contract, no
i mlnv m b h firad

Week
ce
(Continued from Page 1)
backyard gardening may lessen
the widening gap between the
supply and demand for food.
Yesterday, poverty and hun-
ger in the United States were
the topics of another Food Week
activity, located in the Public
Health Auditorium. Four speak-
ers, with various points of
view, discussed the successes;
and failures of the government's
food programs.
S"I FEEL the programs have
served a good purpose and have
been quite responsive to the
people's needs," said Stephen
Hiemstra from the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
In response, Jeff Kirsh from
Food Action Research blasted
Hiemstra declaring the pro-3
grams are "terribly flawed."
"The programs are reaching
more people," Kirsh said but
i more people," Kirsh said but em
emphasized, "The poor are
worse off than they were be-
cause inflation hits them head
on.
Billiards & Bowling
Pinball & Foosball
OPEN
11 a.m. today
Michigan Union

(Continued from Page 1)
assistants shall possess only the
authority conferred upon them
by the ... clerks;" n
-it does not require deputy
registrars to take the oath of
office as required by statute;
-the clerk's authority to dis-
miss such deputy registrars is
limited under the proposed
charter amendment;
-there is no provision for
ending deputy registrars' term
of office; and
-the immense task confront-
ing the clerk in preparing a '
registration list from over 600 1
deputy registrars does not fur-
ther the object of the registry
law which is to prevent fraudu-
lent voting.
IN RESPONSE to the Attor-
ney General's contention of il-
legality The Voter Registration
Committee, a group working
for the passage of the voter bal-
lot proposal, cited the Michigan
Home Rule Act in defense of
the proposal:
"The Home Rule Act states
that, 'Each City Charter shall
provide for the manner and
means of the registration of
voters.' This is the purpose of

our Charter Amendment pro-
posal."
The committee further em-
phasized, "Systems similar to
the voter registration proposal
have been used in various
states and nations with no evi-
dence of a fraud problem.
Canada has registrars canvass
virtually every household and
have registered 98 per cent of
qualified voters.'
HOWEVER, Porter was quick
to point out that door-to-door
voter registration is not in itself
illegal but, "The entire system
they devised for doing it is," in
reference to the local ballot pro-
posal.
Porter added, "The interest
expressed by the petitioners in
the increased registration of
voters is laudatory."
.a
r - °r

Contemporary Directions
IN MEMORIAM: DAVID BATES (1936-1974)
The CONTEMPORARY
DIRECTIONS
ENSEMBLE
URI MAYER, conductor
William Albright, William Bolcom,
Max Lifchitz, Charles Owen, guest artist
SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 8 P.M.
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
DAVID BATES . . . Suena-Gestures & Inter-
ludes I
SST (Magnetic Tape)
Till Then-Gestures II for
piano and magnetic tape
DONALD MARTINO .......... Notturno
OLIVER MESSIAEN.......Oiseaux Exotiques
Presenteed by the U. of M. School of Music
Open to the public without charge

present employe may oe rea
CONSEQUENTLY, they. were for not paying his or her dues.
outraged in October when their However, the GEO take non-
first paychecks did not c>ntain paying employes to court for!
the increase, but the University not paying.
bargainers insisted that the -Non - discrimination in hir-
issue had become negotiable af- ing and firing practices on the
ter the GEO gained olicial basis of race, creed, color, re-
union status. ligion, national origin, sex, age,
In addition to the eight per sexual preference, and physical
cent hike, graduate student as- or mental handicap.
sistants (GSAs) will receive a -Affirmative action. The Uni-
5.6 per cent salary increase efversity will implement a good-:
fective September, 1975, or a faith program to raise the per-:
percentage increase equal to centages of minorities in Uni-
that granted to the faculty for versity departments a n d'
the 1975-76 year. schools.
-Tuition. For all GSAs with-'-

eight or more credit hours, a
tuition fee of $440 will b paid.
This fee is not subject to hikes
in tuition for other students.
-Tuition rebate. The Univer-
sity will pay each GSA a 10
per cent rebate on this term's

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Or write directly to James K. O'Hare

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