100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 23, 1975 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February Z3, 19l7

Page Six THE MICHiGAN DAILY Sunday, February 23, 191)

a=000
rThere IS a %
Sdifference!!! 0
0 PREPARE FOR:
Over 35 years "
of exp lence e
PATn and success "
*T Small classes #
- LSAT Voluminous home
f GRE stud aterialsme"
B constantly updated.
- DCAT 0
111~03Tape facilities for *~
~ reviews of class
f PAT lessons and for use *
of supplementary *
FLEX materials fo
ECMGMake-ups fr
missed lessons 0 '
NAT'L MED DS 0
THOUSANDS HAVE s
0 RAISED THEIR SCORES f
"
f write or cal:
0 (313) 354-0085 d
0 -2171 1W. TenMile Rd.-
f Southfield. Mi. 48015
"
* 4 *
0C 1
0
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
* TEST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 0
"± anChes in Majy U S Cdes

LOOKING

BACK

A
# 1

A Public Seivce dI
Ths Newspaper 3
The AdverItsmg Cow"u

W oAMI~ull
you
YOU~4I
Of course you woul
You work hard. And you
at it. Like most Ameri
But, if all of us did ju
little better, we'd win
up with better products,'
services and even m
pride in the work wec
America. It only w
as well as we
itk NationI CommMIon on /5 i.5 y. Wash

d

T THE WEEK
Sitting-in

WHEN ABOUT 200 minority
. students occupied the Ad-
ministration Building for three
days last week, it seemed at
first as if a page had been torn
from the Strawberry Statement
and brought to life half a de-
cade later. But the demonstrat-
ors quietly left Thursday after-
d. noon, after President Robben
dre Fleming promised to meet with
regood the group tomorrow in a "good
cans. faith" bargaining session.
st a That's all the protestors got
nd - none of their original de-
better mands were accepted by the
ore administration. For their ef-
do. fort - three days and two nights
Norks uncomfortably camped on the
building's second floor - th
- ;earned an appointment w i t h,
Fleming.
hingon.c The students, who represent-
ed Asian-American, Native-Am-
erican, and black campus
groups, staged the demonstra-
tion in favor of increased mi-

IN
careful pl
leadership
ients are1
success of
During 1
involved2
a significa
philosophy
demonstra
the first
Thursday
"solely as
one else
statement.
Similarly
ing withl
the protes
day caucu
selves an
requested
EVEN T
stirre
the demon
Riddle, the
said he
hard to le
so only in
"I don't

"not satisfied" with the Univer-
sity's position. But the students
R EVIEW had originally threatened to 10-
main in he building until all
anning and decisive demands were met.
These two ingred- The confrontation more)ver,
the most vital to he hardly signals a return to the
the mostetalfire-brand radical days of the
-me n late sixties, since the re'ent
the sit-in-, the groups sit-in drew little broad b a s e d
apparently underwent student backing.
nt internal battle over Although some of the present
For example, t h e demands were similar to the
tors' spokesman f o r Black Action Movement issues
two days emerged of 1970, the same out-pouring
expressing opinions of student sympathy was a o t
an individual." Some there last week.
Bread the "official"
d hIVE YEARS AGO the BAM
y, following a meet- demands led to a two-week
Fleming on Tuesday, strike that virtually closed the
stors spent the ncxt University. This time around
using among t h e m- the protest merely aroused cur-
d never so muzh as iosity in most quarters, a r. d
to see the president. the number of those participat-
ing declined over the duration.,
HE decision to leave It inconvenienced an already
d up controversy in beleagured University leader-
nstrators' ranks. San ship, but the bureaucracy ground
e original spokesman, on, even though the stu-lents
found it "personally struck at the nerve center -
eave" and was doing the second floor of the Admin-
the interest of unity. istration Building.
think we won a damn "We won, we won," said one

out is now nearly two weeks
old, and essentially, negotia-
tions are no further along than
they were when the stcke be-
gan. True, the University has
conceded on four supposedly
tough issues - affirmative ac-
tion, non-discriminaion, c o n-
sultation, and recognition - but
the real blockbusters are yet
to come.
Thus far, the GEO has won
only symbolic, or paper v i c-
tories. Even union spokesper-
son Dave Gordon admitted,
"They won't mean a whole lot
to the average TF." What re-
mains to be settled are the real
bread-and-butter issues, wages,
class size and agency shop.
The University has stood firm
on these three negotiating
points. While acknowledging
'that the GEO's economic d e -
mands are justified, President
Fleming contends that "it is ob-
vious that the University is in
financial trouble" and that "the
money has to come from some-
where."
As far as class size is con-
cerned, the University asserts
it "cannot be governed by con-
tractural restrictions" partly be-
cause it "would be impossible
to meet GEO financial demands
while at the same time accept-
ing restrictions on its ability to
generate funds."
AGENCY SHOP, the final ma-
jor issue which remains to
be decided is a fairly standard
provision in labor contracts. Al-
though the University has grant-
ed this demand to all other un-
ions on campus, it maintains
that it "would be a distasteful
course of action" this time be-
cause the GEO does not repre-
sent a majority of the graduate
assistants.
As a result of this impasse a
state-appointed fact-finder will
enter the dispute next week,
Consider each position, and make
a recommendation. The GEO,
which was not originally anxious
at the prospect of fact-finding

Gordon

nority faculty members, addi- thing," he continued. "We gt t
tional financial aid, and a flo:k a flimsy statement from Flem-
of other issues. ing."
Although the sit-in was peace- The group's new spokesman,
AVEL MICH. UNION 763-214 ful throughout and the partiai- Kenneth Jones, acting chairnan
pants cleaned up before leav- of the Black United Front, also
ing, the affair seemed to lack said the demonstrators w e r e
SUMMER '75
EUROPEAN PROGRAM (21 4rdMr ta Daily
WE FEATURE:
* ROUND TRIP FLIGHTS TO EUROPE ummer
SIGN-UP DEADLINE-MARCH 14
Fi 0 DETROIT-LONDON-DETROIT $339.73 ublet
MAY 22-JULY 4'
* DETROIT-BRUSSELS-DETROIT $336.00
MAY 15-AUG. 6
JULY 24-AUG. 15 is coming Mh1975
* INTRA-EUROPEAN STUDENT FLIGHTSMa h '
SAVE UP TO 50 %
Now is the time to submit your ad for this
!EURAILlPASSES
annual event. Forms may be found in the Daily,
* INTERNATIONAL STUDENT IDENTITY at various locations around campus, or at the
CARDS Student Publications Bldg., 420 Maynard St.
IAS TRAVEL Hurry-the first deadline is March 7, 1975.

clemonstrator as he and me oth-
ers marched double file from
the six story brick building.
But all they really won - save
some headlines - could pro-
bably have been garnered wth
a telephone call to Fleming's
office and a request for a meet-
ing with the president.
Fleming might have refused.
Then again giving up a couple
hours is a pretty small conces-
sion on his part.
GEO status-quo
THE GRADUATE Emptoyes'
Organization (GEO) walk-
DR. PAUL USLAN
Optometrist
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 Church 663-2476

because it is not legally-binding,
was even more disgruntled
when it discovered that this
fact-finder in the past has repre-
sented management in labor
disputes. GEO leaders claim
this will sway his recommenda-
tions in favor of the University.
Fact-finding sessions will start
Wednesday and are expezxed to
last at least a couple of weeks.
Meanwhile, the strike goes on
and union members may end'
up losing more in wages during
the walkout than they will gain
through a salary increase.
* * *
Feldkamp foiled
EOR A CHANGE, John Fold-
kamp did not get his own
way.
For the first time in recent
memory, the Board of Regents
did not rubber stamp his propos-
al for a dormitory rate hike
and instead passed by unani-
mous vote a motion to ft eeze
housing fees for the upcoming
year.
The Regental decision was a
compromise between Housing
Director Feldkamp's three p e r
cent increase proposal, and the
report of the Housing R a:

Committee, which reaommentd,d
a 1.23 per cent decrease.
However, it was obvious even
last year that the Regents were
not altogether happy with the
way Feldkamp proposed a rate
increase only a couple of weeks
before dormitory contracts had
to be drawn up. Although A
Regents ultimately appro.'ed
last year's eight per cent :n-
crease, a disgruntled Gerald
Dunn (D-Livonia), when aoli a
decision could not be postp >ned
commented "Every year The
same thing happens and we're
not given enough time to study
the alternatives."
Budget woes
V ARLY THIS w aek, 7ice
President for Academic
Affairs Frank Rhodes announc-
ed that despite budget prob-
lems the University woald not
cut personnel or eliminate pro-
grams. But two days later that
seemingly golden news turned to
brass when University offi.ias
learned that Gov. William Milli-
ken will order a two per cent
budget cut this year.
That news - and the $1.9
million which must be trimmed
from an already emaciated
budget - threw a monkey
wrench into the University's
economic machinery.
Now, the executives must
make reductions termed -dras-
tic" to comply with the Gwver-
nor's executive order, exp+3-. fed
to be announced someinte this
week.
What will stay and what will
go has not yet been determined.
But with previous cuts, tiere is
little left except for essentials
and that means personnel and
programs.
-GORDON ATCHESON
f and CHERYL PILATE

S
'
j i
. t .
,

M*

K

17 1

I

riri! , J

I

I :

i

r

F

I

t
_.
.l..
i
\

fIJ

I
pt
I:

I!

I

i

if
you
see
news

I

I

a4p Mt41lr4,0gan atttoly

happen

call

76-DAILY

I..

NASSAU
FROM 239.

I

[4

I

per person quad occupancy
* TRIP INCLUDES: I
j 0 Round trip air transporta-
I tion via Transair iet, trans-
* fers, 7 nights accommoda- a
! tion, daily snack, cocktail u
t party, green f e e s, tennis, s
s beach baq, and many more
excitinq extras!
0 Sheraton British Colonial
j Hotel
* Other hotels available at
* additional cost
Great Places
Peter Hebert
2016 Traver, Ann Arbor
662-2117 (evenings)
P.O. Box 2059, Ann Arbor
(313) 769-1776 48106

f

-.

i

r

FEBRUARY 27, 1975
11:00-12:30 Workshops
9:00-10:30 a.m. Workshops
(A complete list of workshops will be avail-
able from the Office of Ethics and Religion
at the time of registration)

"THE CONTEMPORARY
WOMEN'S MOVEMENT
AND ITS EFFECT ON
BLACK WOMEN AND
THE CHURCH"
by Sarah Ward, Director,
Program for Children
with Learning Problems,
Education & Training
Division of Model
City Administration,
Boston, Mass.
Kuenzel Lounge, Mich. Union
"THE CONTEMPORARY
WOMEN'S MOVEMENT
AND ITS EFFECTS ON
TRADITIONAL RELIGIONS"
by Jewish Speaker-
Ms. Carol Weiner,
Dept. Head, Hebrew
Union College Library

I

I).IIIC *J(UYI..fltyV..J

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan