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February 18, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eight THEMICHIGAN DAIL

U' takes public stance

Q f 1Mirbigan BaiIJ
ummer
ublet
upplement
is coming March 23, 1975.
Now is the time to submit your ad for this
annual event. Forms may be found in the Daily,
at various locations around campus, or at the
Student Publications Bldg., 420 Maynard St.
Hurry-the first deadline is March 7, 1975.

- a

(Continued from Page 1)
equal to that of the faculty for
the 1975-76 year. Also, they
have proposed a tuition rate of
$440 per term for all GSAs with
eight or more credit hours.
THE PREVIOUS University
offer provided for a tuition fee
of $548 per term which would
not be subject to a tuition hike
for other students. The current
offer is subject to changes.
This leaves the GEO a risk to
take. The current University
offer is better than the previous

one only if tuition is not raised.
If there is a substantial tuition
hike, they will pay more than
they would have under the
previous proposal of $548.
" Class size. The report as-
serts that "the class size issue
is one on which the University
cannot permit itself to be gov-
erned by contractual restric-
tions." Factors that must be
considered include: educational
policy, faculty determination on
how best to operate the depart-
ment, the impact of technologi-

Prof. sees new role
for future computers

(Continued from Page 1)
in its early stages, the rate of
growth in the art has been
"really fantastic," according to
the professor.
REITMAN contrasted the pro-
cess of educating humans -'
through years of schooling -
with the relatively simple task
of educating computers with
tapes. The expense for com-
puters, he said, would be "a
matter of $100 in 20 seconds in-
stead of $100,000 in 20 years."
But two major obstacles today
block the process of teaching
computers. One, Reitman ex-
plained, involves getting com-
puters to see. This factor of per-

ception, he said, is an impor-
tant difference between humans
and computers.
Computers, he said, "can't
process things in volume," and,
at present, cannot distinguish
faces, t e x t u re or complex
scenes.
THE SECOND problem, Reit-
man said, lies with the task of
learning. Computers can easily
store simple facts, the psychol-
ogist stated, but unless they
can discover the implications of
those f a c t s, the computers
haven't duplicated human cap-
abilities.
But Reitman predicted both
p r o b l e m s may be overcome
within 10 to 15 years.
Reitman, the author of a 1965
book on computers called "Cog-
nition and Thought," expr-ssed
greater reservations at over-
coming the control problem.
"Where do we stop?" he asked,
adding that with use of arilfi-
cial intelligennce on a very
large scale, "we may be asking
for trouble."

cal change, cost, and the fact
that policy and practice vary
enormously in different parts
of the campus."
THE GEO has demanded a
limit of 25 students for most
classes, and a limit of 20 where
student participation is essen-
tial, such as language classes.
If either party is to move
on this issue, it is more likely
to be the union. While much of
GEO's undergraduate support
hinges on this demand, the Uni-
versity would face an outraged
faculty should it be granted.
t Agency shop. The demand
is that a service fee be assessed
from all GSAs who do not be-
long to the union, since they
would benefit from the contract
negotiated by the GEO.
The University holds that al-
thought they have granted an
agency shop to all other unions
on campus, "it is complicated
in this case because the GEO
appears still to represent less
than half of the TAs and RAs;
. . . to impose the requirement
of joining the union or paying
a service fee on those who do
not wish to join is a distasteful
course of action, particularly
in an academic group."
IN ADDITION, the University
claims that the provision would{
be unjust for all those GSAs
who teach class as part of their
fulfillment of degree require-
ments. GSAs in this category
make up a substantial portion
of the graduate student popula-
tion.
. Recognition. T h e r e has
b e e n considerable movement
from both sides on this impor-
tant and complex clause.
The two sides have agreed
that union members will be;
identified by their employment
as GSAs. Under the agreement,
a GSA is any person who is a:
"student in good standing in al
TTAA its is A-- -- >

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AP Photo
By a whisker
Herbie, the world's only ping pong playing feline, just manages to get the ball over the net
in a ferocious game yesterday with owner Ar mand Korstick of Kankakee, Illinois.

classroom instruction in
electronic music
studio
Partial list of subjects covered during
our 12-week course:
* Sound properties and acoustical phenomena
" Electronic generation and modification of sound
" Theory and use of voltage-controlled equipment
" Tape recorder characteristics and operation
" Studio recording, splicing and mixing techniques
555 e. william 994-5404
LAST SERIES OF CLASSES THIS
TERM BEGINS THURS., FEB. 20

PARK
TERRACE
848 Tappan
at Oakland
Deluxe 1 and 2
Bedroom Apartments
See Don or Marilyn Olsen
APT. 10
or call 769-5014
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Ankli wuins upset
2nd ward victory

Vandals
hit U'

(Continued from Page 1)

- --s. -,. n ,.. .

pumu...~uinuFuuinuq

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11

Liberty at Division

MEDIUM PIZZA, With 2 Items
FOR THE PRICE OF A

I
B
r
t
I
t

SMALL PIZZA, With

2 Items

"WE MY vey wel en up'U-m graduate degree program."
losing conr becau we have UHowever, the GEO wants the'.
no way of tracking down the provision to include a griev-:
logic of theractions the com- ance procedure from a neutral
puter takes" on complex issues observer. This the University
Reitman also pointed out that
humans have advantages over 0 Consultation. The two sides
computers in that they possess have virtually agreed on thel
the ability to change their clause which would allow '1SAs
minds. a voice in departmental mat-
ters which concerned GSAs.
The computer age, which is In conclusion, Fleming ex-
no more than 25 years old, pressed "the hope that there
claimed its first instance of ar- would be no violence or illegal
tificial intelligence in 1935. To- acts during the strike." How-
day, as illustrated in a film at ever, he added "there have
the lecture, computers can take been more than a dozen false
orders from humans and under- fire alarms, 60-70 tires slashed
stand simple uses of langiage is
and a bomb threat, which dis-
rupted a scheduled examina-
tion.
The GEO held another mass
meeting at the First Methodist
Church last night to discussc
tactics and rally support forI
FROM their week-old walkout.
4 3 ,Only 300-400 members showed
up for the under - publicized
per personcuad oOccupancy meeting. GEO leader Mark
a....- m.m........ - SKaplan announced plans to labell
S TRIP INCLUDES: GSAswho do not support the
* 0 Round trip air transporta- - strike by putting identifyingI
1 tion via Transair jet, trans- stickers on their office doors.i
fers, 7 niqhts accommoda- u Some members expressed oppo-1
.tion, doily snack, cocktail1siontthstregj
Party, qreen fe es,:ennis, sitio to tis strategy'
beach boq, and many more ! One person declared, "I1
excitinq extras! , don't support anything but a
" Sheraton British Colonial I very passive, peaceful kind of
u Hotel approach," to which Kaplan
. Other hotels avoilable at ! responded, "There are people
additional cost I that the only way to deal with
r/mm - mm-mm - mm-m---- is more harshly."
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will not be an easy one to win.
She attributed her victory to C I
"people agreeing with me on
my budget points" and her (Continued from Page 1)
stands on other issues.
In the April election Tiyior sign that the strike is getting
will be up against Republican;out of hand."
Karen Graf and HRP member "I do not attribute the van-
David Goodman. dalism to GEO," Rhodes said,
Incumbent councilman Henry "but given the atmosphere of
viewed his overwhelming vic- the strike, these things are in-
tory as a "mandate. Ifeel it escapable."
shows that the voters in the Frederick Davids, the director
Third Ward, the Republican of University security, observed
voters at least, are happy with that "we've gone through many
i what the Republicans have been 'strikes before without that kind
I doing on City Council." of damage."
HENRY promised in his cam-
paign to fight tax increases, ONE PERSON arrested for
and pledged his support to the deflating tires yesterday was
Republican proposals on Corn- identified by a picketer as a
munity Development and Rev- University student. He was ar-
Ankli enue Sharing (CDRS). rested near a picket line behind
Wensel's campaign cen-ered the LSA Building at about 2
around the importance of "open- p.m., and released snorky there-
NEED FOR INCREASE ing" the Republican party. "The after.
IN STEEL PRODUCTION Republicans run this town like
CLEVELAND (P) - "To ac- dictatorship," he has said. An officer at the scene re-
commodate market require- Wensel was also opposed to the marked, "They've been doing
ments looking to 1980, the Unit- Packard-Platt shopping center, that all over. We finally caught
ed States will have to increase which Henry at first opposed one.
annual raw steel production by and later voted for.- Some GEO members allege
some 25 million net tons," ac- WENSEL has accused Henry that they have received inordi-
cording to Robert G. Welch, of lying "to garner votes in the nately rough "pushing and shov-
president, Steel Service Center last election . . . Packard-Platt ing" from police w -le picket-
Institute. "This will require is an excellent examole of ing yesterday and Friday. A po-
production capacity in the coun- Henry's lying," he said last lice spokesperson could not be
try of around 190 million net week. reached for comment on the
tons," he stated. Wensel intends to continue to

r
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OFFER GOOD TUES., FEB. 18th
one coupon per pizza

FREE DELIVERY

769-8030 *

"Add to that the 25 million
tons that is needed to balance,
modernize and maintain exist-
ing facilities and the scope of
the planning and investment
that is required becomes appar-
ent," said Welch.
"The plain fact is, world steel
output must reach in excess of
one billion net tons by 1980 in
order to satisfy steel user de-
mands. That translates to
added world capacity of 315
million net tons over the next
six years."

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support the Republican pau
but is undecided as to wheth
he will support Henry in 1
April election.
ANCIENT TRADITIONS
BEHIND RESOLUTIONS
CHICAGO (P) - The Ne
Year's resolution - that pro
ise to correst fauls and b.
habits - is rooted in ancie
traditions.
It may have originated in a
cient Persia (Iran), report
searchers for World Book E
cyclopedia. The Persians, th
note, followed the custom
giving eggs to their friends
the new year. Since an e
hatches into life, the gift sig
fied beginning again.
In England, cleaning t
chimney on the first of the ye,
was supposed to bring go(
luck to the household during t
coming year. "Cleaning tl
slate" at the New Year, sa
World Book, is today's versic
of "Cleaning the chimney."
The Jewish New Year, whic
is celebrated in late September
also has a tradition of cleans:
or "starting over." At that tir
the religious symbolically ca;
away their sins in rivers.

matter.

A Publi Service ofI
a alThis Newspaper b
T\1N dveris~ng Coua
iad
Fmtt

-a

Of course you would.
You work hard. And you're good
at it. Like most Americans.
But, if all of us did just a
little better, we'd wind
up with better products, better
services and even more
pride in the work we do.
America. It only works
as well as we do.
The National Commssion on rCidit0Iy, Washingon, .C.,
DR. PAUL USLAN
Optometrist
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 Church 663-2476

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Appointments Available
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Arborland-971-9975
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E. Liberty-668-9329
E. University-662-0354

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