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February 18, 1975 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 18, 1975

downstairs
FIRST TIME AT THE VILLAGE BELL-EVERY

Kissinger, Gromyko
confer on Mideast

I

TUESDAY IS PITCHER NIGHT.
DOWN AND HAVE SOME FUN.

COME

ON

TUESDAY:
PITCHERS $2.25
village
bell ,,

GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) -
Secretary of State Henry Kis-1
singer and Soviet Foreign Min-
ister Andrei Gromyko ended
two days of talks yesterday
aimed at narrowing U.S.-Soviet
differences on the Middle East
and other issues.
Gromyko told newsmen that
on many subjects in the wide-
ranging discussion "our posi-
tions were close or coincide."
"IT IS no secret, and I am
sure that the secretary of state
will agree, that our position on
some others do not exactly coin-
cide," he added.
"I consider the talks to be
fruitful for U.S.-Soviet relations
and we are convinced for other
states and for the international
situation as well," Gromyko al-
so said when Kissinger escorted
him down from the secretary's
hotel suite.
Kissinger planned to see
British leaders in London, then
fly back to Switzerland for
lunch today with Shah Moham-
med Reza Pahlevi of Iran, who
is on a ski trip.
IT WAS understood that the
subjects discussed by Gromyko
and Kissinger included negotia-
tions foragreements to limit
nuclear arms and curtail under-
ground nuclear tests and Soviet-
American trade, in addition to
the Mideast.
Kissinger s a i d yesterday's
talks covered implementation of

the U.S.-Soviet summit agree-
ment to set ceilings on nuclear
weapons. Negotiators from both
sides began work Jan. 31 draft-
ing the details of the accord
reached between President Ford
and Communist leader Leonid
Brezhnev when they met Nov.
23 in Vladivostok.
Earlier, U.S. officials said the
Soviets so far had not been
"actively obstructionist" in Kis-
singer's efforts to obtain another
Israeli withdrawal in the Sinai
in return for tangible moves by
Egypt toward acceptance of the
existence of Israel.
HOWEVER, the Soviets have
renewed pressure for early re-
sumption of the Geneva peace
conference, which the United
States opposes for fear it would
break down into a dispute over;
Palestinian participation.
Despite the Soviet position,I
Kissinger is going ahead with
his attempt to negotiate another
Israeli-Egyptian agreement. On
the basis of his exploratory talks
in Jerusalem and Cairo last
week, he plans toreturn to the
Middle East about March 10
to undertake negotiations be-
tween the two capitals.

AP Photo
Excuse me, professor
Margaret Truman Daniel and former Arkansas senator J. William Fulbright chat last night
prior to the winter convocation of George Washington University. Fulbright was the graduA-
tion speaker at the school, and Daniel received on honorary Doctor of Letters degree.
Chrysler loses $73 million

10

UTES

PAUL GERNI
POCKET BILLIARDS
Exhibition-FREE
Thurs., 4 & 8 p.m.
Union Ballroom

Kissinger also conferred yes- DETROIT ()-Chrysler Corp.
terday with Roger Gallopin, lost a stunning $73.5 million in
president of the executive coun- the fourth quarter of 1974, giv-
cil of the International Commit- ing it a net loss of $52 million
tee of the Red Cross about for the year.
Americans missing in Indo- In their year-end report yes-
china. Kissinger reportedly told terday, the firm blamed the
Gallopin that the United States gasoline shortages of the early
appreciates Red Cross efforts part of the year, inflation and
on behalf of 2,300 Americans un- later recession for the poor per-
accounted for in Indochina, in- formance.
cluding 900 listed officially as THE LOSS was the largest
missing in action. for any quarter or year in
Chrysler's history. Previous rec-
San Jose State University, ord's were $29.6 million in 1958,
S Uincluding a $34.1 million lass in
San Jose, Calif., is the oldest the third quarter.
public college on the West Chrysler is expected to be theI
Coast. only car maker reporting a lossE

for 1974. General Motors earned sharp reversal from 1973, when
$950 million; Ford'has yet to Chrysler earned $255 million, in-
report and American Motors cluding $74.4 million in the final
finished its fiscal year ended period.
Oct. 30 with profits of $27 mil- Teetering on the brink of fi-
lion. nancial ruin and apparently see-
Chrysler dollar sales in 1974 ing continued bad times in early
were $11 billion, down from 1975, Chrysler said it has made
$11.8 billion a year earlier. Total special c r e d i t arrangements
vehicle sales slumped to 2.3 mil- with nearly 200 U.S. banks.
lion from the record 3.5 million The firm said its financing
in 1973. subsidiary, Chrysler Financial
SALES IN the fourth q'iarter Corp., has also entered into a
were $2.5 billion, down from $300 million stand-by credit ar-
$3.4 billion in the 1973 period. rangement with a group of 19
The year's loss marked a major U.S. banks.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULIETIN

In the time it takes to drive responsible for killing young people r-U-K---- ---R,
your friend home, you could save are most often other young people. DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y
his life. Take ten minutes. Or twenty. BOX 2345
If your friend's been drinking Or an hour. Drive your friend ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
too much, he shouldn't be driving, home. That's all. If you can't do I want to save a friend's life.E
The automobile crash is the that, call a cab. Or let him sleep on Tell me what else I can do.
number one cause of death of your couch . I My name is__
people your age. And the ironic We're not asking you to be Addres_
thing is that the drunk drivers a doctor or a cop. Just a friend. city _ _ Stat e Zip
"YMMStHIGHWAY SAPETY ADVIS ORYCOMMrr ,
IFYOU LETA FRIEND DRIVE DRUNK,YOU'RE NO FRIEND.
\ 3. DPAIW1i 0'TOFMNSPORTAtYOr.." NAT14N ALN4GHWAY TNAPi'CSAFETY ADMNRjNUT911
Use Daily Classifieds

BIG 3
Pre-Inventory
Reference
BOOK
SALE
TODAY
AT
FOLLETT'S
MICHIGAN BOOK STORE
STATE ST., End of Diag
NEW TITLES
ADDED DAILY'

Katy Mellen. Graduated in 71 with a
B.S. in Textiles and Clothing. Doing
well - and moving forward - in Car-
gill's commodity Marketing D vision
GROWTH
Graduating Seniors and M.B.A.'s:
Accounting " Agriculture Business .
Engineering - Liberal Arts
Cargill-at the leading edge. Active in agricul-
tural, industrial, and consumer commodities
and products, and in a variety of other related
businesses. You could be there! We need top
people for a wide range of positions, careers
that lead to management. Our policy is to
stimulate leadership potential. To encourage
personal creativity. To recognize and reward
individual achievement. And to promote from
within
A Corgill representative will be interviewinq on
campus February 26. Check with the placement
office now for the dates and location. Look
into leadership!

Tuesday, February 18
Day Calendar
WUOM: Stanley Payne, History
prof., U of Wisconsin, "Succession
in Spain." 10:05 am.
Med. Ctr. Commission for Women
Meeting: C3086 Outpatient, noon.
Maternal, Child Health Films;
This is Larry, M1112 SPH II, noon.
CEW: Coping with Reentry series,
"Within Yourself," last session, 330
Thompson St., noon-2 pm.
STAFS Seminar: J. Eisley, A.
Sussman, "Institutional Obstacles to
a Desirable Future in Higher Edu-
cation." E. Conf. Rm., Rackham,
noon-2 pm.
Environmental Studies: R. Price,
"Constrained Social Situations and
Cost," 4001 CC Little, 3 pm.
Ctr. Coordination Ancient ,Mod-
ern Studies: H. D. Cameron, "Pe-
tronius' Satriicon." 2408 Mason, 4
pm.
Near East. Studies; Ctr. N. East.,
N. African Studies; Comp. Lit.: Ar-
nold Band, "Love and Family in
Agnon's Literature,'- Leo. Rm. 2,
MLB, 4 pm.
English, Ext. Service: Poetry read-
ing, Herbert Scott, Aud. 3, MLB, 4:10
pm.
Anthropology Museum, Ctr. for
Afro-Amer., African Studies: Thurs-
ton Shaw, Cambridge, England,
"Origins of African Agriculture,"
A, Angell, 4-6 pm; "The Archaeo-
logical Discoveries at Igbo-Ukwu,
Nigeria, with Special Reference to
Dating," Lee. Rm. 2, MLB, 8-10 pm.
-ame
JEWISH LAWS
AND CUSTOMS
CONCERN ING:
DEATH
BURIAL and
MOURNING
One in the series
of the Living
Jewish Catalogue
TUES.-FEB. 18
8:00 p.m
at
HILLEL-1429 Hill

Romance Lang.: Michel BeauJour,
NYU, "Rhetorique de l'auto-por-
trait: Memoire artifielle et memoire
naturella," W. Conf. Rm., Rack-
ham, 4:15 pm.
Res. College: Mary Edwards, "Con-
temporary Feminist Fiction," Greene
Lounge, E. Quad, 7 pm.
Bio-Ethics: V. Elving Anderson,
U. of Minn., "The Health Profes-
sional and Human Genetics," Rack-
ham Amph., 7:30 pm.
Psychiatry: L. Heston, "Genetics
and Schizophrenia: The Problem
of Genetic Analysis," CPH Aud., 8
pm.
Musical Society: Rampal, Veyron-
LaCroix, flute/keyboard duo, Rack-
ham Aud., 8:30 pm.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7460
Summer Research Positions,
$860-$960/mo for new grad. & grad.
students in physical and environ-
mental sciences, math, & engineer-
ing with Oak Ridge National La-
boratory. Deadline March 1. Write
Calvin Lamb, P. 0. Box X, Office of
Professional & University Relations,
Oakridge, Tenn 37830.
Fellowships for grad. study in
Public Affairs at U. of Texas for
students in any major interested
in public policy study & research
leading to public service career.
Write Lyndon Johnson School of
Public Affairs, U. of Texas, Austin,
Tx 78705.
MA in College Services Admin.
offered by Oregon State U. Write
Dr. Wm. Fielder, Sch. of Educ., Cor-
vallis, Ore., 97331.
Liberal Arts grad. Preparing to
teach Math, Sci., English, Soc.
Studies, Langs. apply to Temple U.,
Philadelphia, Pa. 29122. Classes begin
in June. Interns begin work in
city or suburban schools as full-
time salaried teachers in Sept., A
MA degree & certification earned.
"Career Opportunities for Women
in Health Sciences, Business, and
Government," luncheon / discussion
will be held, Conf. Rms. 1 & 2,
League, Feb. 20, Noon.
Studying Too Bard?
Free lecture
on Hypnosis
Wed. at 7:30
ANN ARBOR
HYPNOSIS CENTER
611 CHURCH, Suite 3029
761 -0440

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F

-TONIGHT ONLY-
the Indochina Peace Campaign in Ann Arbor
presents
Jack Nicholson
("Carnal Knowledge," "Five Easy Pieces")
IN
The Last Detail
(1974) Raw, moving comedy-drama of two Navy "lifers"
ordered to take a youna recruit to the brig, where he has
been sentenced to a long term for a small infraction that
embarrassed an officer. On the way, they decide to treat
him to the life he will be missing behind bars, but only
succeed in revealing their own desperation to each other.

7:30 & 9:30 p.m.

Modern Languages Bldg.

Feb. THURSDAY 20
BILL GRAHAM'S historic

FILLMO E
(1973) The last night at the Fillmore East:
Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead, Santana,
Quicksilver, Messenger Service, Hot Tuna, Boz
Scaggs, New Riders of the Purple Sage, more
MORE THAN A GREAT PERFORMANCE FILM

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JACK FOREM
Author of
TRANSCENDENTAL

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40b.. &I LAY As ,N br 3

Ci 7!30 Fr 9!30 Nnturni Science Aud.

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