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February 11, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 11, 1'975

PageEigit TE MCHIAN DILYTuesayFebuary11,197

Biblical Themes as Cinema
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Special Meeting of the
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OPEN TO ALL MEMBERS OF
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TOPICS: Review of current Student Health Insurance Pro-
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Panel proposes new
energy posstilities

TALKS CONTINUE

By JEFF RISTINE
Nuclear power, electricity
from the sun and a recentraliz-
ation of society - all three rep-
resent possible solutions to to-
day's energy shortages,saccord-
ing to the members of a panel
discussion on future energy sys-
tems last night.
The panel, part of the Future
Worlds lecture series, was com-
posed of Mark Enns, a profes-
sor of Engineering; Peter Op-
permann, a professor in the
School of Architecture; and
Peter Van Dresser, a guest lec-
turer from New Mexico.
ENNS, WHO advocates devel-
opment of nuclear energy, drew
the most opposition from the
audience of around 500 during
the question and answer per-
iod. He maintained, however,
that the risks associated with
use of nuclear power have been

mounted glass panels for each
individual home. Sunlight, pass-
ing through the panels, would
create a "greenhouse effect"
and transfer heat to water
tanks.tSome sort of storage sys-
tem, however, would be neces-
sary for cloudy days.
But Oppermann predicted
possible legal problems if some-
one's shading obstructed a
nearby solar system. "The law
field will have a bountiful new
area to operate in," he noted.
Van Dresser, however, claim-
ed "highly innovative energy
systems will be less necessary"
under his proposal. He calls
his system "biotechnic recen-
tralication."
He sees the system as "an
evolutionary process" whereby
society would readapt itself and
utilize more local energy re-
sources. The changeover, heE

(Continued from Page 1) ,
the concept of a union going on
strike while negotiations are
taking place is an unusual and
illogical one.
THIS ASSERTION was hotly
contested by David Gordon in ,
his address to the GEO mem-
bers.
"The time to go out on strike
is just when progress is being1
made at the bargaining table,"
he insisted. "The time is going
to come when the University
will say, 'Be reasonable, we're
close to an agreement, so go
back to work.' It's precisely at
that time that we cannot go
back to work."
Massive picketing will begin
at 7:30 this morning around
major University buildings, with
the exception of dormitories, all
over the central and north cam-
pus.
HUNDREDS of pickets were
signed up as of last night to

work iii two hour shifts. Soup
kitchens will provide meals for
worn-out union members who
will be expected to work two
shifts per day.
"Remember we're being non-
violent," declared acting GEO
President Aleda Krausse, "but
you can glare at them as much
as you want to glare."
The amassed GSAs (Gradu-
ate Student Assistants) loudly,
applauded an announcement by
Residential College (RC) sopho-
more Debbie Mast that the RC
community voted overwhelm-
ingly yesterday to cancel all
classes for the duration of the
strike.
THE REFERENDUM was
set in motion by the RC Repre-
sentative Assembly which
called for a collective RC poli-
cy in regard to the strike to be
established. The referendum,
which carried 468 to 79 in a
vote of RC students and faculty,
also established East Quad as

begins strike

TOMn Mallow
THE
Joeepli A.Walker
FEBRUARY 14-16
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rejected it saying, in effect, that
our proposals were off the wall
-too much money, too much
innovation. We made it clear at
that time that if they rejected
our proposal we were going out
on strike."
Reached last night at his
home, Fleming remained non-
commital on most GEO develop-
ments. When asked if he had
any comment to make concern-
ing the RC referendum he said,.
"yes, that's interesting."
Vice President for Academic
Affairs Frank Rhodes said he
"regretted the strike because
we were so close to agreement,"
adding that he hoped the walk-
out would be characterized by
"determination to keep things
peaceful and to respect for the
rights of individuals."
COUncil-
approves
CURS.
progra-m
(Continued from Page 1)
moderate income areas of the
city.
However, liberal-radical coun-
cil persons contended road re-
pair is a regular city responsi-
bility and its funding should
come from regular revenues-

WED., FEB. 12
8:30 P.M.

ANDERSON ROOM
MICHIGAN UNION

e

._

1

Could you be
a nuclear expert?
(If so, you could earn more than $500 a month
your Senior year.)

'

1

"greatly exaggerated." Yt, heconceded, would take "two or
"The record is excellent," he three generations."
said. Enns added that "most
European countries are going at E
this (nuclear energy) more g c la
tan aeFacuity i
gressively and with less delay anwear.
Oppermann, however, suggest-
ed changes in architecture and serve any useful purpose for
designing to accommodate use this assembly to inquire into the
of sola energy. "Our buildings I hsasml oiqieit h
of solar ,eer.o bildings details. To put tentative things
willdbecome more organic," he out to broader public discussion
predicted. is not helpful."
THE PROFESSOR called so- TERMING the weekend nego-
lar energy "the most promis- tiating session "intensive, long
ing" of alternative energy sys- and also productive," Wilkinson
tems, maintaining that it would informed the assembly that "we
be free, non-contaminating and have approached agreement on
universal. some issues, but there is still
Oppermann proposed roof- a long way to go.
"We're glad to see-even at
""""""""""""""" this late date-that the Univer-
e.' There IS a : sity agreed to meet with us,"
S difference !Wilkinson commented. "Per-
. d____rence______ haps we will have a contract
PREPARE FOR: soon. That is a distinct pos-
*AT Over 35 years " sibility."
MCAfT3 of experience * Contending that GEG "owed
' B n nA ndsccs it to the students not to let a
A Smallclasses *hstrikehcarry on capriciously,"
LSAT - * Fleming questioned the union's
# voluminous home " reasoning for not delaying a
GRE study materials " strike.
Courses that areG"It doesn't seem to me to
: ATGSD constantly updated " make sense," said Fleming,
a " "for the union leaders not to
- UCA Tape facilities for ; recommend that they (GEO)
reeso anfr use wait 24 or 48 more hours. .
" PA l of supplementary * I don't follow the logic of on
" materials " one hand saying, 'Yes, we are
" FLEX kesr * making progress,' but on the
"Make-ups for eI other saying, 'Yes, we are going
- ECFMG missed lessons to strike'."
:NAT'L MED BDS* IN RESPONSE to Fleming's
* THOUSANDS HAVE s remark, Wilkinson affirmed that
* RAISED THEIR SCORES " "a strike in no way suggests
Swrite or call: ,negotiations have broken off."
0 (313) 354-0085 " Wilkinson added that, "We
" 21711 W. Ten Mile Rd. I have established mechanisms
" Southfield, Mi. 48015 # for starting and ending a strike,
* , and when we have a contract
S- e we will end this strike as speed-
* Uily and expiditiously as pos-
" " sible."
EDUCATIONAL CENTER ("haling the Senate
" TEST PREPARATION.
S SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 for Its action, Gordon described
""BacesmMacu S aes *""HARTERS

i
,

the GEO headquarters durir
Lk Sthedla walkout.
Thereferendum stated th;
RC faculty pay "may be doc
the faculty as being, "very un- ed" if the professors do not ho
clear on the important issues class. However, RC Direct
involved." Marc Ross confirmed la
night that, "no investigatic
GORDON ALSO maintained will be made into faculty a
that "It's been only through tivity. Faculty will only I
threat that we've moved them docked if they turn themselv
(the University) so far. - - -.in."
It's incumbant upQQ us to go out in."
on strike to keep up on that In describing yesterday's n
threat." gotiation proceedings Gordc
Another motion ". . . that said, "The union in an atteml
parties be urged to reach a to forestall a strike . . . pr
resolution to dispute at earliest posed the lowest set of demanc
possible date," was adopted by we thought we could live wit]
the assembly without dissent. However, the University total]

(Continued from Page 1)

Even if you're a Junior engineering or
physical science major, it's not too early
to start thinking about your career. And
if you think you've got what it takes to
become an expert in nuclear power, the
Navy has a special program you should
look into right away.
Why right away? Because if you're se-
lected, we'll pay you more than $500 a
month during your Senior year. (If you are
presently a Senior, you can still join the
program. We'll begin paying you $500 a
month as soon as you are selected.)

Cobb prol

ng
at
,k-
Ad
'or
st
on
ic-
be
es
e-
on
apt
.o-
ds
:h.
Ely

What then? After graduation and Offi-
cer Candidate School, you'll get nuclear
training from the men who run more than
70% of America's nuclear reactors--Navy
men. And an opportunity to apply that
training in the Navy's nuclear-powered
fleet.
Only about 200 men will be chosen for
this program this year. So, if you're inter-
ested, call us.
Be someone special
in the Nuclear Navy.

offer to Cobb, whom the Regents
unanimously selected for the
deanship last month, consisted
of a two-year term with no sub -
sequent guarantee of tenure,
The Daily learned.
While the University has so
far revealed few details of its
negotiations with Cobb, numer-
ous sources have confirmed
that the administration refused
to give her the post two weeks
ago, after the zoology depart-
ment hastily rejected the cell
biologist's request for tenure.
A source close to Cobb said
she would like the deanship de-
cision to be fully investigated
but does not wish to initiate the
probe herself. The source told
The Daily that one of the Re-
gents may suggest an inde-
pendent review of the adminis-
tration's actions at the board's
meeting later this month.
UNIVERSITY' Presilent R b-
ben Fleming could not be reach-
ed for comment on HEW's re-
quest for information last night.
But Edward Dougherty, <ss.st-
ant to the vice president for
academic affairs, said his office
has not yet learned of the fed-
eral request.
Meanwhile, several members
of the deanship search commit-

t
t
a
r

)uAn HRP law suit would focus
e soughton the road repair allocation,
according to Kozachenko.
tee told The Daily they were KOZACHENKO c h i d e d the
amazed by the zoology lepart- road repair allocation: "Instead
ment's rejection of tenure for of 'let them eat cake' Ann Ar-
Cobb. bor will say 'let them eat
One committee member said gravel.'"
the panel had begun its work The Republicans' allocations
last prin wit "th wor i varied little from a controver-
last spring with "the working s akfre' eomne
assumption that a tenur po- sial task force's recommended
sition would come with an out- allocations for CDRS.
sider . . . Ordinarily, tenure is Major revisions of the Chi-
a formality." zens' committee's recommenda-
tions included: eliminating $128,
Both the administration arid 000 for job training; cutting the
the zoology department's ciair- contingency fund from $185,625
man, Carl Gans, have refused to $85,625; and adding the con-
to provide details of the deci- troversial allocation for road
sion on Cobb's tenure. repair.
Fordopposed to
odgasoline rationing

I

For additional information Lt. Bob Lindner U.S. Navy will be in Ann Arbor each
Wednesday at 106 E. Washington. Stop in or call 665-4404

1

a1

PREPARE FOR THE U
MCAT, DAT, LSAT,'
e
GRE,&ATGSB t
MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
LOCAL CLASSES BEGINNING SOON
A Unique Approach to
EXAMINATION PREPARATIONe
the(l 7e -9 C te
(313) 663-3598

(Continued from Page 1)
which he implemented by exec-
utive order last month.
Holding up a copy of the
measure now before the Sen-
ate Finance Committee, Ford
drew applause when he said it
is "so patently obvious to me
that a program and a plan is
needed - not a step back-
ward."
Meanwhile, the chairman of
the Senate Budget Committee
says it may be economically
sound to increase Ford's $52 bil-
lion deficit to spur recovery
from the recession and limit fu-
ture federal red ink.
BUT SEN. Edmund Muskie
(D-Maine) said in an interview
that he doesn't know whether
that idea is politically "sala-
ble" even if it makes sense
economically.
Muskie said "our economic
advisers are working on a
game plan that would reduce
unemployment and increase
production."
"Although it may increase
the deficit in the first year, it
may also produce a lesser over-
all deficit for a four-year per-
iod," he said.
MUSKIE CITED estimates by

some economists that the job-
less figures projected in Ford's
fiscal 1976 budget mean a $750
billion loss in production and a
$250 billion loss in federal reve-
nue over what otherwise might
be possible in the next few
years.
It raises the question, Muskie
said, whether Ford has provid-
ed an effective means of fight-
ing the recession after accept-
ing the idea that a budget defi-
cit is what is needed.
Much of the hour-long inter-
view dealt with the political
plans of the Maine Democrat,
whose 1972 presidential bid
saw him plunged from front-
runner to also-ran within less
than two months.
He described his current
attitude toward a 1976 race as
"a state of suspended anima-
tion" and said he is making
plans to seek re-election to the
Senate next year while leaving
open "the possibility that might
change."
He acknowledged that the lure
of the presidency remains, not-
ing that "having been reason-
ably close to it once, there's
some chemistry about the whole
thing that keeps you drawn to
it."

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