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February 08, 1975 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, February 8, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

,

-61

1 ,s!

1 !

BRIDGE:

Defender's misplay at
first trick lets
declarer make contract

i ,
'
.)

Crime wave hits
S. Division St.

I

III

After West had passed and
North had opened one club, East
realized that his side did not
rate to buy the contract. Never-
theless, he bid a preemptive'
two spades in order to oostructr
the easy flow of the enemy's
bididng and to suggest a lead
to his partner. South, with his
balanced hand and double heart
stopper, jumped to three no-
trump, ending the auction.
NS Vul.
EW NVuI.

y A FRANK BEL- =-= By JEFF RISTINE!
A miniature crime wave hit
shifted to the nine of .iamcnds. three blocks of one street in
Now that declarer was in com- the middle of the city Thursday,

' was taken. The hard-to-please
robber had better luck at the
third house where, after prying
open a door, he carried off a

'17
WES
"
WEST

VORTJI
74

mand, winning the ten of dia- wth six breaking-and-enterings garnet ring and some loose
monds, he proceeded to knock netting one thief money, jew- I change - less than $5 - from
out the ace of clubs and claim elry, and a bite to eat. a piggy bank and jar of coins.
his contract with an overtrick. But the as-yet-uncaptured But one of the residents of
Declarer made a good play robber acted somewhat strange- the house said the burglar left
when he ducked East's que(n of ly, by failing to steal expensive} more valuable items behind.
spades, for he knew that East items he could have easily tak- Calling the robber "weird," the
was marked with six ;patLos and en. victim said typewriters, a cam-.
very likely only one of tue club era and a check were among
honors. Thus, by ducking the ' FROM TWO houses on the 500 the items not stolen.
first spade trick, he wald be block of S. Division, the burglar AND, IN an apparently busy
depriving West of the spade stole a portable TV worth $150, night, the rip-off artist pried
necessary to knock out Suth's a two-dollar wrist watch, $150 'open a door and walked away
remaining spade stopper before in cash, a sweater and, accord- with $400 worth of jewelry.
the clubs could be established. ing to the police, three dough- If all the robberies were com-
East, however, should not nuts. Evidence shows the mitted by the same person -
have given South the chance to i criminal had to kick in a door the police believe they were -
duck the first trick because he to rip off the doughnuts. he she may have crossed town
should have ducked it himself, Further down the street, on to Hubbard St. There, in an-
forcing South to win one of his the 300 block, someone picked other breaking and entering,
spade stoppers prematurely. out three houses. At two of someone stole $22 and, again,
Then, when South attacks the , them, the police said, doors jewelry, this time only about
club suit, West would be able were pried open, but nothing $17 worth.
to continue with another spade.
East would now split his spade
honors, and declarer would be I em s ""e""'

Rentin g

A
A
Q

Q5
Q 4
J10 9 2
EAST

4 85 4 K Q 9 6 3 2
V76432 r 9 8
* 97632 * 8 5
..K 4A75
SOUTH
!AJ10
. V K K ..J A710
f K J 10
48643
The bidding:
West North East South
Pass 1A. 24 3 NT
Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: Eight of spades.
West obediently led the eight
of spades. South played dum-
my's four, East rose with the
queen of. spades, and South
shrewdly ducked the trick.
East returned the deuce of
spades, and South took the
marked finesse against Iost's
spade king, winning his jack of
spades. Declarer now led the
club trey, and West perforce
won his singleton king of clubs.
Lacking a third spade, West

I
t
t

Whether or not South ducks
the second round of spades, the
defense would have established
East's spades while East still
possessed an entry to cash
them.
Indeed, if declarer now tries
to make the contract by knock-'
ing out the ace of clubs he willI
suffer a two trick as the defense
collects two clubs and four
spades, ' a total of six iricks.;
In matchpoints especially, South
would be well advised to take
his eight tricks, two spades,,
three hearts, and three dia-
monds, and go home.

form coalition

(Continued from Page 1)
for housing while Democrats
provided only $742,000 as did the
citizen's committee, yet Jamie
Kenworthy (D-Fourth Ward)
pointed out CDRS automatically
provides about $.5 million in a
separate grant.
The two parties' major differ-
ence in allocating funds is in
the community services cate-
gory with Democrats proposing
some $2 million and the HRP

necessarv for CDRS,

which

grants $12 million over a six
year period. The citizens' com-
mittee has outlined no such
long-term plan.
A $100,000 recommendation by
the citizens' committee for fire
equipment was blasted by both
parties as a normal city re-
sponsibility and not in the spirit
of CDRS.

GOODMAN

was optimistic

Unemploym enlt hBits
postwar record high

about $800,000. about HRP and Democrats
The major difference between sponsoring a joint proposal
the two parties community serv- saying, "The points of variance
ices' recommendations centers between the two parties are not
around day care. Democrats that great . . . we will do ev-
have doubled HRP's allocation'ervthing we can to reach an

l Flemin
to had
(Continued from Page 1)
younger than the 58 year old
Fleming.
Saxon, 55, was characterized:
by one"West Coast observor as
"a rising star" in the Univer-t
sity administration.
M I C H I G AN State Uni-
versity president Clifton Whar-
ton has been named as a
fourth candidate, but his nomi-!
nation is considered unlikely.,
The source indicated that
Fleming would be asked to re-
turn to California for more in-t
terviews with the regentall
se=,rch committee.<
Fleming, however, said last!
night he had had no further
contact with the U-C committeec
since an interview last week-t
end. Asked if he was returning1
for further talks, Fleming ans-
wered, "I don't have any plans
to go to California."
THE SOURCE, who maintains
close relations with several U-C
regents, said yesterday that!
while Fleming was viewed as!
"a very able" candidate, his+
age could be a negative factor.
"The question is, are the re-
gents looking for someone who!
can serve three to eight years,'
or someone who can stay ten to
15 years?", he said.t
The source added that some
of the regents felt "somone
closer to the generational
changes going on" might make
a better president.
S O M E California observ-
ors now say that Saxon may
be the front runner for the
$60,000 a year post. Formerly
the vice chancellor of UCLA,
Saxon was promoted last sum-
mer to the newly created pro-
vost position.
A final decision on the U-C
presidency is expected some-
time within 30 days.

Center
focuses on
freedom
(Continued from Page 1)
school; aggression and testing of
authority, for example," she
commented.
"There's a point at which
lines have to be drawn, and we
all try to do is draw them in
a non-authoritative way, so as
not to create the Big Mad
Teacher vs. Bad Little Kid re-
lationship," she added.
MURPHY admitted that she
"sometimes feels like I'm at the
end of the line." But, she em-
phasized, "It's the business
that's exhausting, not the kids."
Murphy described the curricu-
lum as "basically practical. We
take nature walks, do plays,
and I teach them about letters
and numbers through games."
She added, "We want to
teach them beginning reading,
too, but we take it easy, take
them when they're ready. You
can't push; you can't throw
abstracts at them too fast."
INITIATED in November
1973 by the Ann Arbor Tribal
Council CCC is the city's second
alternative educational center.
It recently wrote up its elemen-
tary school program and has
constructed a small portable
classroom in which classes will
be held.
Since local health and fire in-
spectors have already approved
the new building, the center on-
ly awaits accreditation by the
State Board of Education.
"As soon as accreditation
comes, we can go all the way
to eighth grade, but we'll pro-
bably stick with elementary,
at least for the present," said
Murphy.
"We're limited by space, but
we're going to try to take12
more than the four school-age
kids we have now," she add-
ed.
In 1971, the highest bank in-
terest rate was that of Brazil at
20 per cent, and the lowest,
that of Morocco at 3 per cent.
THE
BAHA'I
FAITH
Foundation for
World
Civilization I
Sun., Feb. 9
2:00 P.M.
(on Packard)
Village Green
Clubhouse

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AUSTIN-MORO
Big Rock Jazz Band
Present a Concert at
ANN ARBOR BIMBO'S
114 E. WASHINGTON
SUNDAY, Feb. 9-2 to 5:30 p.m.
Adv. Tickets $3.50 At the Door $4
18 pc. Band-Contemporary Rock/Jazz Sounds

UNIVERSITY OF MiCHIGAN THEATRE PROGRAM
tPRESENS
BREAD aid ROSES
a new play by Donald Hall

ADVANCE SALE AND INFORMATION:
TICKET OFFICE , MENDELSSOHN LOBBY, 764-0450
TICKETS NOW ON SALE

y 7 1

V.[:F)A i OUGH SAT URDAY,
FEFAY66. 7. 8, 1975800P M
.rOW FCfNF R FOR THE PERI O'.NGAff

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t.~

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(Continued from Page 1)
they were unable to find full-
time work. This was an in-!
crease of 400,000 people on the
December level.
Only a few days ago White
House Press Secretary Ron
Nessen said the Administra-
tion did not expect unemploy-
ment to hit the eight per cent
mark in January.

million with all of the rise due
to an increase in women and
teenagers looking for jobs.
Total unemployment in the
United States fell to 84.6 mil-
lion people fro 85.2 million.
The unemployment rate for
adult men rose to six per cent
from 5.3 per cent while the key
rate for household heads rose to
5.2 per cent from 4.6 per cent.
The unemployment rate among'

President Ford's senior eco- household heads is closely
nomic advisers, however, have j watched because of its effect on
been warning that the jobless family income and influence on
rate would average 8.1 per cent the level of consumer spending.
through this year with the peak U UNEMPLOYMENT
being around 8.5 per cent. among adult women rose to 8.1
UNEXPECTEDLY, per cent from 7.2 per cent while
the size of the civilian labor teenage unemployment advanc-
force increased during Janu- ed to 20.8 per cent from 18.1 per
ary by 300,000 people to 92.1 cent.
The rate among non-whites
rose to 13.4 per cent from 12.5
per cent with the teenage rate
u rn s advancing to 41.1peFcent from
37.7 per cent. This compared
"W with white teenage 'unemploy-
ment of 18.4 per cent - up from
15.9 per cent.

r
.

of $200,000. The CDRS citizens'
committee $123,750.
ANOTHER difference in the
two parties' proposals hits
funding for park acquisition and
development. The Democrats
have almost doubled HRP'sI
$90,000 proposal.
Kathy Kozachenko (HRP-Sec-'
ond Ward) attacked the Demo-'
cratic CDRS proposal for ig-
noring minority job training as-
sistance and recommending
$106,250.
Kenworthy e x p 1 a i n e d
the Democratic position point-
ing to the Comprehensive Em-
ployment Training Act whichj
provides funds for minority job
training.
YET BOTH parties agree on
the basic intent of CDRS and
attacked the citizen's committee
for failing to develop criteria forI
establishing the priorities of
low and moderate income resi-
dents, as stated in a Democra-
tic press release.
The two liberal parties also
stated that a comprehensive
plan stating specific goals is

agreement."
However Kenworthy appeared
less willing to compromise stat-
ing, "It doesn't make a damn
bit of difference whether a mi-
nority proposal is supported
{ with four votes or five."
With one HRP council mem-
ber and Democrats holding four
council seats, an HRP-Democra-
tie CDRS pronosal would con-'
stitute a large minority of
council capturing five of the
11 council votes.
IIARD LUCK IN UTAh
LOUISVILLE (T) - The
Kentucky Colonels of the Amer-
ican Basketball Assn. dread
playing the Utah Stars, espe-
cially in Utah. In November the
Colonels dropped an overtime
game 111-110 to the Stars and it
marked their 19th defeat in a
row in Utah's Salt Palace.

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credit
(Continued from Page 1)
our economy into deeper trou-
ble," Burns said.
However, Burns disagreed
with predictions by the Ford
administration's leading econ-
omists that the current reces-
sion may last well into next
year.
He said the recession may
be over sooner than expected,
pointing to the fact that indus-
trial inventories are being li-
quidated at a rapid rate.
"THAT means the declines in
economic activity must come
to an end and very soon"
Burns said.
Thi8 WOIIMP
$2.50
FRI.-SAT.-SUN.
ELEKTRA RECORD'S
PAUL
SIEBEL

ASIAN-AMERICAN
AWARENESS WEEK
FEBRUARY 8, SATURDAY
Childrens Workshop at 10 a.m.--Games for Children,
Storvtellinq: Community Orqanizinq in Chicago
Chinatown at 2 p.m.--Speakers from the Chinatown
Community
Both at the
ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY
SOCIAL GET-TOGETHER AT 8 P.M.
SOUTH QUAD, SMITTY LOUNGE
FEBRUARY 9, SUNDAY
Asian-American Literature Workshop--Markley, Angela
Davis - Lounae. at 11 a.m.-Garret Honoo-discussion
n leader: Momoko Iko--uest speaker
Asian-American History Workshop - Mosher-Jordan.,
Main Lounge at 1 p.m.-William Wei--discussion
leader
REFRESHMENTS AT ALL EVENTS
sponsored by Eastwind, Michician Union 41 39

Bursley Hall Enterprises
PRESENTS
A SILENT COMEDY CLASSIC
The General
starring
BUSTER KEATON
TONIGHT: Sat., Feb. 8-9:00 p.m.
BURSLEY W. CAFE-Adm. $1.00
UM ID required for admission

iP I '4: y °g'±.' . , SSE. '' ;i :'t ''-3 k

U W7 '~ M "IS#- 1fr '4 I .I --6

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